Stacey Jenkins

Stacey Jenkins
Charles Sturt University · School of Management and Marketing

Doctor of Philosophy

About

8
Publications
796
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57
Citations
Introduction

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Workplace wellbeing is a fast-developing subject in employment relations. This qualitative study examined the workplace wellbeing of police during COVID-19. There has been a significant critique of the narrow focus only on individual resilience and stress as the cause of workers’ poor mental health and wellbeing. Research into frontline workers’ me...
Article
Objective To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. Method An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. Setting and Participants The survey was complete...
Article
Full-text available
Occupations in the skilled trades are highly segregated with women comprising 1–3% of this workforce in Western nations. We report on a systematic review of 26 articles, from 1998 to 2019, which explored women’s recruitment and retention in the skilled trades. Two research questions underpinned the review; the first identified challenges and barrie...
Technical Report
Full-text available
The aims of the CSU “Women in Trades” study are to investigate areas that are fundamental to understanding how women, in regional New South Wales particularly, achieve sustainable careers in the manual trades. It explores why and how women are recruited and retained in such occupations, how they contribute to productivity in the workplace and how t...
Article
To date, there has been little examination of those who complete training in male-dominated sectors and continue to work in these sectors within regional Australia. Therefore, in this preliminary qualitative study, we examine the attraction and retention issues of women entering male-dominated trades within regional NSW. This paper reports on findi...
Article
Drawing from institutional theory, this study explored work–life balance (WLB) practices in Australian small and medium enterprises. Data were obtained from a sample of 219 managers. The authors identified organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of 4 groups of WLB practices using a causal model. Of the 3 models tested, the final...
Article
Full-text available
Very little research today has investigated the role of governance structure and three of its elements: shared knowledge, decision making and benefit sharing, in learning processes for innovation in member-serving nonprofit organizations (MSNPOs). This research project aims to develop a theory suggesting that the above elements play a significant r...
Article
Full-text available
Very little research today has investigated the role of governance structure, knowledge sharing and decision making in the innovation process in member-serving non-profit organisations (MSNPOs). This research project aims to develop a theory suggesting that the above elements play a significant role in innovation process that leads to strategic adv...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This research aims to examine student and employer perceptions toward two forms of accreditation of university business programs i.e. • International accreditation such as AACSB, AMBA and EQUIS • Professional accreditation based on discipline (i.e. accounting, marketing, HR, finance) The research aims to capture these stakeholder perceptions toward accreditation, the value they place on accreditation as a marker of quality and or graduate employability and any additional benefits they may associate with accreditation. Such information will then be used to guide decision making processes in relation to accreditation for business courses at Charles Sturt University and could be useful to external stakeholders to inform similar decision making.
Project
The aims of the CSU “Women in Trades” study are to investigate areas that are fundamental to understanding how women, in regional New South Wales particularly, achieve sustainable careers in the manual trades. It explores why and how women are recruited and retained in such occupations, how they contribute to productivity in the workplace and how these factors promote longevity and career satisfaction. Our research explores the role of individual resilience, socio-cultural factors and workplace cultures in supporting women’s personal and professional success in the manual trades. Our research ultimately explores why some women prosper in jobs that are considered traditionally male-dominated, while others do not. To date the project team has engaged in eight media outreach opportunities around the nation, presented at two international conferences, three national conferences, five regional symposiums and conducted three comprehensive industry stakeholder consultations. We have conducted 27 in-depth interviews with tradeswomen, apprentices, group training organisations, industry support agencies, employers, VET providers and school careers advisers. Our preliminary findings are published in the International Journal of Training Research and online in The Conversation.