Souta Hidaka

Souta Hidaka
Rikkyo University · Department of Psychology

Ph.D

About

56
Publications
10,381
Reads
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444
Citations
Citations since 2016
25 Research Items
290 Citations
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - December 2012
January 2008 - December 2012
Tohoku University

Publications

Publications (56)
Article
Orientation information contributes substantially to our tactile perception, such as feeling an object's shape on the skin. For vision, a perceptual adaptation aftereffect (tilt aftereffect; TAE), which is well explained by neural orientation selectivity, has been used to reveal fundamental perceptual properties of orientation processing. Neural or...
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Full-text available
Vision of the body without task cues enhances tactile discrimination performance. This effect has been investigated only with static visual information, although our body usually moves, and dynamic visual and bodily information provides ownership (SoO) and agency (SoA) sensations to body parts. We investigated whether vision of body movements could...
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Our bodily sensation is a fundamental cue for our self-consciousness. Whereas experimental studies have uncovered characteristics of bodily sensation, these studies investigated bodily sensations through manipulating bodily sensations to be apart from one’s own body and to be assigned to external, body-like objects. In order to capture our bodily s...
Article
Perceptual completion is a fundamental perceptual function serving to maintain robust perception against noise. For example, we can perceive a vivid experience of motion even for the discrete inputs across time and space (apparent motion: AM). In vision, stimuli irrelevant to AM perception are suppressed to maintain smooth AM perception along the A...
Article
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by atypical social communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors; such traits are continuously distributed across nonclinical and clinical populations. Recently, relationships between ASD traits and low-level multisensory processing have been investigated, because atypical sensory reactivity h...
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We perceive the roughness of an object through our eyes and hands. Many crossmodal studies have reported that there is no clear visuo-tactile interaction in roughness perception using static visual cues. One exception is that the visual observation of task-irrelevant hand movements, not the texture of task-relevant objects, can enhance the performa...
Article
Recent studies have demonstrated that mental representations of the hand dorsum are distorted even for healthy participants. Perceptual hand maps estimated by pointing to specific landmarks (e.g., knuckles and tips of fingers) is stretched and shrunk along the medio-lateral and the proximo-distal axes, respectively. Similarly, tactile distance perc...
Article
Spatial distortions in touch have been investigated since the 19th century. For example, two touches applied to the hand dorsum feel farther apart when aligned with the mediolateral axis (i.e., across the hand) than when aligned with the proximodistal axis (along the hand). Stimulations to our sensory receptors are usually dynamic, where spatial an...
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Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by symptoms such as social deficits and restricted interests and behavior. Several studies have investigated specific sensory processing in relation to ASD traits. However, findings appear to be inconsistent and inconclusive because of variation in ASD traits among...
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Crossmodal studies have reported not only facilitatory but also inhibitory perceptual interactions. For instance, tactile stimulation to the index finger of a hand leads to the degradation of visual discrimination performance (touch-induced visual suppression, TIVS). It has been suggested that the magnitude of TIVS depends on the spatial congruency...
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Crossmodal studies have reported not only facilitatory but also inhibitory perceptual interactions. For instance, tactile stimulation to the index finger of a hand leads to the degradation of visual discrimination performance (touch-induced visual suppression, TIVS). It has been suggested that the magnitude of TIVS depends on the spatial congruency...
Article
When we hold thin metallic bars between the palms of our hands and rub the palms against each other, the feeling of touching smooth velvet occurs. Previous studies have shown that tactile motion and pressure on the palms are important for this velvet hand illusion. Interestingly, when we experience this illusion, we cannot feel the texture of our p...
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Our visual system briefly retains a trace of a stimulus after it disappears. This phenomenon is known as iconic memory and its contents are thought to be temporally integrated with subsequent visual inputs to produce a single composite representation. However, there is little consensus on the temporal integration between iconic memory and subsequen...
Article
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) includes characteristics such as social and behavioral deficits that are considered common across the general population rather than unique to people with the diagnosis. People with ASD are reported to have sensory irregularities, including crossmodal perception. Crossmodal correspondences are phenomena in which arbit...
Article
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and interaction, and restricted interests and behavior patterns. These characteristics are considered as a continuous distribution in the general population. People with ASD show atypical temporal processing in multisensory integration....
Article
Studies of crossmodal interactions in motion perception have reported activation in several brain areas, including those related to motion processing and/or sensory association, in response to multimodal (e.g., visual and auditory) stimuli that were both in motion. Recent studies have demonstrated that sounds can trigger illusory visual apparent mo...
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Crossmodal studies have demonstrated inhibitory as well as facilitatory neural effects in higher sensory association and primary sensory cortices. A recent human behavioral study reported touch-induced visual perceptual suppression (TIVS). Here, we introduced an experimental setting in which TIVS could occur and investigated brain activities underl...
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Only a few Japanese psychologists have been interested in the history of psychology. The historiography-or the methodology of historical description-for the history of psychology has been ignored. Moreover, chairs for professors, academic journals, academic meetings, and an archive of the history of psychology remain to be established. In this pape...
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Research regarding crossmodal interactions has garnered much interest in the last few decades. A variety of studies have demonstrated that multisensory information (vision, audition, tactile sensation, and so on) can perceptually interact with each other in the spatial and temporal domains. Findings regarding crossmodal interactions in the spatiote...
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In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio...
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It has been reported that color can affect the judgment of taste. For example, a dark red color en-hances the subjective intensity of sweetness. However, the underlying mechanisms of the effect of color on taste have not been fully investigated; in particular, it remains unclear whether the effect is based on cognitive/decisional or perceptual proc...
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An input (e.g., airplane takeoff sound) to a sensory modality can suppress the percept of another input (e.g., talking voices of neighbors) of the same modality. This perceptual suppression effect is evidence that neural responses to different inputs closely interact with each other in the brain. While recent studies suggest that close interactions...
Article
The brain tends to associate specific features of stimuli across sensory modalities. The pitch of a sound is for example associated with spatial elevation such that higher-pitched sounds are felt as being "up" in space and lower-pitched sounds as being "down." Here we investigated whether changes in the pitch of sounds could be effective for visual...
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We investigated the effects of listeners' head movements and proprioceptive feedback during sound localization practice on the subsequent accuracy of sound localization performance. The effects were examined under both restricted and unrestricted head movement conditions in the practice stage. In both cases, the participants were divided into two g...
Article
Visual motion aftereffects can occur contingent on arbitrary sounds. Two circles, placed side by side, were alternately presented, and the onsets were accompanied by tone bursts of high and low frequencies, respectively. After a few minutes of exposure to the visual apparent motion with the tones, a circle blinking at a fixed location was perceived...
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Perceptual systems can distinguish among a variety of inputs in the temporal domain, including even different sensory inputs. This process has been investigated mainly by using a temporal task (temporal order judgment: TOJ). For example, studies have reported estimated critical limits (just noticeable difference: JND) of the TOJ between a visual st...
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When a visual target briefly appears in a display containing visual motion information, the perceived position of the target is mislocalized forward along its direction of motion. This phenomenon is assumed to be caused by the interaction between the transient onset signal of the target and motion information. However, while transient onset and off...
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Pattern redundancy is a key concept for representing the amount of internal mental load (encoding efficiency) needed for pattern perception/recognition. The present study investigated how pattern redundancy influences encoding and memory processes in the visual system using a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm. With RSVP, it is well k...
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One possible strategy to evaluate whether signals in different modalities originate from a common external event or object is to form associations between inputs from different senses. This strategy would be quite effective because signals in different modalities from a common external event would then be aligned spatially and temporally. Indeed, i...
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On cross-modal interactions, top-down controls such as attention and explicit identification of cross-modal inputs were assumed to play crucial roles for the optimization. Here we show the establishment of cross-modal associations without such top-down controls. The onsets of two circles producing apparent motion perception were accompanied by indi...
Article
Detection performance is impaired for a visual target presented in an apparent motion (AM) trajectory, and this AM interference weakens when orientation information is inconsistent between the target and AM stimuli. These indicate that the target is perceptually suppressed by internal object representations of AM stimuli established along the AM tr...
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Auditory temporal or semantic information often modulates visual motion events. However, the effects of auditory spatial information on visual motion perception were reported to be absent or of smaller size at perceptual level. This could be caused by a superiority of vision over hearing in reliability of motion information. Here, we manipulated th...
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We investigated brain activity in 3-5-year-old preschoolers as they listened to connected speech stimuli in Japanese (first language), English (second language), and Chinese (a rarely exposed, foreign language) using near-infrared spectroscopy. Unlike the younger preschoolers who had been exposed to English for almost 1 year, brain activity in the...
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Letter discrimination performance is degraded when a letter is presented within an apparent motion (AM) trajectory of a spot. This finding suggests that the internal representation of AM stimuli can perceptually interact with other stimuli. In this study, we demonstrated that AM interference could also occur for pattern detection. We found that tar...
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After a prolonged exposure to a paired presentation of different types of signals (e.g., color and motion), one of the signals (color) becomes a driver for the other signal (motion). This phenomenon, which is known as contingent motion aftereffect, indicates that the brain can establish new neural representations even in the adult's brain. However,...
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Vision provides the most salient information with regard to the stimulus motion. However, it has recently been demonstrated that static visual stimuli are perceived as moving laterally by alternating left-right sound sources. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear; it has not yet been determined whether auditory motion signals,...
Article
In representational momentum (RM), the final position of a moving target is mislocalized in the direction of motion. Here, the effect of a concurrent sound on visual RM was demonstrated. A visual stimulus moved horizontally and disappeared at unpredictable positions. A complex tone without any motion cues was presented continuously from the beginni...
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An abrupt change in a visual attribute (size) of apparently moving visual stimuli extends the time the changed stimuli is visible even after its physical termination (visible persistence). In this study, we show that elongation of visible persistence is enhanced by an abrupt change in an attribute (frequency) of the sounds presented along with the...
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Vision provides the most salient information with regard to stimulus motion, but audition can also provide important cues that affect visual motion perception. Here, we show that sounds containing no motion or positional cues can induce illusory visual motion perception for static visual objects. Two circles placed side by side were presented in al...
Article
The alternation of sounds in the left and right ears induces motion perception of a static visual stimulus (SIVM: Sound-Induced Visual Motion). In this case, binaural cues were of considerable benefit in perceiving locations and movements of the sounds. The present study investigated how a spectral cue - another important cue for sound localization...
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Audition provides important cues with regard to stimulus motion although vision may provide the most salient information. It has been reported that a sound of fixed intensity tends to be judged as decreasing in intensity after adaptation to looming visual stimuli or as increasing in intensity after adaptation to receding visual stimuli. This audiov...
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Thus far, it has been pointed out that motion representation is completed in motion trajectory, and that motion representation interferes with a single physical input at a specific time and space in the motion trajectory. However, it has not been fully investigated whether the internal motion representation could interact with multiple physical inp...
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In the present research, we investigated the depth information contained in the representations of apparently moving 3-D objects. By conducting three experiments, we measured the magnitude of representational momentum (RM) as an index of the consistency of an object's representation. Experiment 1A revealed that RM magnitude was greater when shaded,...
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Synesthesia is the phenomenon in which the stimulation of one sensory modality results in perception in another modality, namely, unstimulated modality. Colored hearing is a synesthesia in which sound stimulation induces visual color perception. The current research investigated the speed and consistency of sound-color association in a colored-hear...
Article
Apparent motion is perceived when two objects are presented alternately at different positions. The internal representations of apparently moving objects are formed in an apparent-motion path which lacks physical inputs. We investigated the depth information contained in the representation of 3-D moving objects in an apparent-motion path. We examin...
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In order to perceive apparent motion, it is necessary to determine the correspondence between the objects presented across time and space (the correspondence problem; Ullman, 1979). In addition, the internal representations of apparently moving objects are formed in the apparent motion path, which lacks any physical inputs. This research investigat...

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