Sonia Graham

Sonia Graham
University of Wollongong | UOW · School of Geography and Sustainable Communities

PhD (Rural Sociology)

About

62
Publications
16,694
Reads
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2,163
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
1439 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
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Introduction
Dr Graham is a rural, environmental geographer with a mathematical bent. Combining these two skill sets, she uses social science methods and computer modelling to understand how the relationships between individuals and institutions affect the management of natural resources. Dr Graham is currently researching the fairness of collective action in adaptation to sea-level rise.
Additional affiliations
February 2020 - present
University of Wollongong
Position
  • Research Associate
Description
  • DECRA Research Fellow
December 2017 - December 2019
Autonomous University of Barcelona
Position
  • PostDoc Position
January 2015 - December 2019
UNSW Sydney
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Senior Lecturer in Social Research and Policy
Education
August 2007 - February 2012
Charles Sturt University
Field of study
  • Rural Sociology
March 1999 - October 2002
The University of Sydney
Field of study
  • Environmental Geography; Applied Maths

Publications

Publications (62)
Chapter
Existing studies on sea-level rise focus on impacts to specific coastal places and the individuals living and working within those places. There is little consideration of the ways individuals are attached to multiple coastal places and the compounding effect this may have on their overall vulnerability to sea-level rise. The aim of this chapter is...
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Full-text available
Adaptation to climate change is inescapably influenced by processes of social identity – how people perceive themselves, others, and their place in the world around them. Yet there is sparse evidence into the specific ways in which identity processes shape adaptation planning and responses. This paper proposes three key ways to understand the relat...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change will have a significant impact on coastal locations, affecting visitors’ and residents’ values and experiences. Yet, we know little about the ways visitors value the coast and how they may be affected by climate change impacts. There is a need for place-based studies, where residents and visitors are studied alongside one another to...
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Indigenous Peoples and local communities have implemented myriad responses to deal with and mitigate climate change impacts. However, little effort has been invested in compiling, aggregating, and systematizing such responses to assess global patterns in local adaptation. Drawing on a systematic review of 119 peer-reviewed publications with 1851 re...
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Enduring sustainability challenges requires a new model of collective leadership that embraces critical reflection, inclusivity and care. Leadership collectives can support a move in academia from metrics to merits, from a focus on career to care, and enact a shift from disciplinary to inter- and trans-disciplinary research. Academic organisations...
Article
Empirical studies among small-scale societies show that participation in national development programs impact traditional norms of community cooperation. We explore the extent to which varying levels of village and individual involvement in development policies relate to voluntary cooperation within community settings. We used a field experiment co...
Article
Empirical studies among small-scale societies show that participation in national development programs impact traditional norms of community cooperation. We explore the extent to which varying levels of village and individual involvement in development policies relate to voluntary cooperation within community settings. We used a field experiment co...
Article
Weeds pose severe threats to agricultural and natural landscapes worldwide. One major reason for the failure to effectively manage weeds at landscape scales is that current Best Management Practice guidelines, and research on how to improve such guidelines, focus too narrowly on property-level management decisions. Insufficiently considered are the...
Article
Collective action among conservation and rural land managers is required to protect natural and rural ecosystems from the spread of invasive plants. Achieving such tenure-blind collective action is a considerable policy challenge and social research on this topic is in its infancy, is rural-focused and rarely addresses multiple species concurrently...
Article
Growing numbers of researchers and animal rights advocates are concerned about the welfare of invasive nonhuman animals, and new government policies echo these concerns. Past survey research, however, shows that the general public defines invasive animal welfare differently than scientists and animal rights advocates. There is little social researc...
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Full-text available
Controlling invasive species presents a public‐good dilemma. Although environmental, social, and economic benefits of control accrue to society, costs are borne by only a few individuals and organizations. For decades, policy makers have used incentives and sanctions to encourage or coerce individual actors to contribute to the public good, with li...
Data
Data S1. Materials and methods. Table S1. The 124 pre‐submitted research questions that address fundamental and applied issues in weed ecology, evolution and management
Article
Weed management science and practice largely focuses on eradicating, containing and reducing existing weed populations; the focus is on plants in situ. More recently, the redefinition of biosecurity to include weeds has seen greater attention paid to preventing the introduction of weeds to previously uninfested areas within countries. Thus weed hyg...
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Full-text available
Weedy plants pose a major threat to food security, biodiversity, ecosystem services and consequently to human health and wellbeing. However, many currently used weed management approaches are increasingly unsustainable. To address this knowledge and practice gap, in June 2014, 35 weed and invasion ecologists, weed scientists, evolutionary biologist...
Article
A key criterion of successful adaptation to climate change is that it avoids potential inequalities arising from climate impacts or from adaptation strategies themselves. Recent research on adaptation in developing and developed countries argues that the measures of such fairness cannot be captured by standard metrics of vulnerability and should be...
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Full-text available
Coastal flooding affects physical and social place attachments. Values-based approaches to climate change adaptation examine how risks to place attachments are distributed within and among communities, with a view to informing equitable adaptation policies. In this nascent body of research, divergent theoretical frameworks and empirical approaches...
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For two decades researchers and policy makers have been arguing that community-based collective action is needed to effectively control weeds. Yet there has been little social research into the ways that collective weed control emerges at local scales. The aim of this paper is to investigate the mechanisms through which three local landholder group...
Book
A comprehensive examination of justice research on resource, environmental and community issues. Environmental management involves making decisions about the governance of natural resources such as water, minerals or land, which are inherently decisions about what is just or fair. Yet, there is little emphasis on justice in environmental management...
Article
Transdisciplinary weed research (TWR) is a promising path to more effective management of challenging weed problems. We define TWR as an integrated process of inquiry and action that addresses complex weed problems in the context of broader efforts to improve economic, environmental and social aspects of ecosystem sustainability. TWR seeks to integ...
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Full-text available
Transdisciplinary weed research (TWR) is a promising path to more effective management of challenging weed problems. We define TWR as an integrated process of inquiry and action that addresses complex weed problems in the context of broader efforts to improve economic, environmental and social aspects of ecosystem sustainability. TWR seeks to integ...
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Full-text available
Sustainable climate change adaptation requires an understanding of people's place attachments, so that potential impacts and trade-offs are illuminated when making adaptation decisions. Methods are needed that elucidate these important, but often intangible, place attachments at risk. A study was undertaken to explore place attachment, and how thes...
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Multiple active partnerships in the health and water sectors in Cambodia exist to address climate change adaptation, operating beyond typical sectoral and organizational divides. Decisions around national adaptation policy are made predominantly by the relevant lead ministry, contrasting with where funding originates from (i.e., major donors, multi...
Article
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Local residents, businesspeople, and policymakers engaged in climate change adaptation often think differently of the time available for action. Their understandings of time, and their practices that invoke time, form the complex and sometimes conflicting temporalities of adaptation to environmental change. They link the conditions of the past to t...
Article
Understanding the values and socio-economic characteristics of people at risk from climate change will inform how people feel about the likely distribution of impacts, as well as adaptation responses. This knowledge is necessary if adaptation is to achieve distributive fairness now and into the future. This study advances methods and analyses used...
Article
Many of the world's most challenging environmental problems are trans-boundary in nature, requiring the cooperation of diverse actors. This study aims to assess the roles of trust and power in achieving environmental collective action among rural land managers. The empirical example used is serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma), a highly invasive,...
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Full-text available
Local governments are not adapting to sea-level rise because it is difficult to build consensus on the need for change and the best way to implement it. In theory, adaptation pathways can resolve this impasse. Adaptation pathways are a sequence of linked strategies that are triggered by a change in environmental conditions, and in which initial dec...
Article
Adjustment to predicted environmental change in a place requires people in that place to consider short- and long-term futures there. These futures are imagined with reference to pasts and presents, remembered and lived. This paper presents the stories relating possible futures to pasts and presents of residents in tiny, low-lying coastal communiti...
Article
Sea-level rise poses major challenges to coastal land uses, and therefore to urban planning processes. In theory, if done well, urban planning can lead to responses to sea-level rise that are socially and environmentally sustainable. In practice, urban planning processes may fall short of this ideal. We use multiple methods to describe and analyse...
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Full-text available
Arguments that fairness should be a guiding principle of climate change adaptation have been primarily concerned with distributive and procedural aspects of fairness, with far less attention paid to the temporal, spatial and interactional dimensions of fairness. This paper presents the results of a study that sought to understand the multiple dimen...
Article
Household CO2 emissions are a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions and consequently climate warming. Despite this, there has been little consideration of how household CO2 emissions may be affected by changes in climate. The aim of the present study has been to investigate the way climate, as well as socio-demographic characte...
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Full-text available
The spread of pest plants is a trans-boundary problem that causes losses to biodiversity and disrupts ecosystems. Much social research into, and policy development for, weeds has conceptualised their control as a problem facing individual landowners, rather than as a collective action problem. In the case of serrated tussock (Nassella trichotoma),...
Article
Analysis of the risks of sea-level rise favours conventionally measured metrics such as the area of land that may be subsumed, the numbers of properties at risk, and the capital values of assets at risk. Despite this, it is clear that there exist many less material but no less important values at risk from sea-level rise. This paper re-theorises th...
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A research-based collaboration with a rural community engaged with the risks and opportunities involved in renewable energy production. Natimuk Township, within the Victorian wheat and sheep belt, is atypical in its renewal by tree-change migrants attracted by the nearby rock climbing destination of Mt Arapiles. The collaboration aimed at crafting...
Article
Research into the effects of seven management techniques on survival and growth of eucalypt seedlings planted on farmland is reviewed. The techniques include: pre- and post-planting weed control; soil cultivation; fertiliser; mulch; tree guards/shelters; and irrigation. The initial and ongoing effects of each technique are discussed—including the e...
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Full-text available
In Australia and many countries worldwide environmental flows are becoming an increasingly popular tool for reducing the negative impacts of river regulation. However, there are many factors that restrict the effectiveness of these flows such as thermal pollution, existing physical infrastructure and the limited volume of water available. Since env...
Chapter
Climate variability is one of a number of factors that can affect the success of tree plantings. One way to accommodate climate variability in decision making is to use seasonal climate forecasts (SCF). SCF have been used to improve a range of on-farm decisions, however, their usefulness in natural resource management, such as tree planting, has re...
Chapter
Establishment of eucalypt seedlings is often uncertain due to climate risks, especially in terms of drought-related moisture stress. We reviewed scientific knowledge relevant to short-term 'establishment success', in terms of seedling survival and photosynthetic and vegetative growth responses during the establishment phase (post-germination and em...
Article
The success of environmental and commercial forestry plantings in Australia's low to medium rainfall zones can be affected by drought-induced mortality during seedling establishment. An analysis of management options for climatic risk like those employed for agricultural industries requires both experimental data and simulation capacity. The growth...
Article
Investment in small and large-scale revegetation in Australia is growing in response to concerns regarding the sustainability and productivity of agricultural landscapes. Site preparation and management––such as soil cultivation, weed control, fertilising, mulching, use of treeguards and watering––are major costs associated with small-scale reveget...
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This article reports on the findings of a scoping study that elicited the views of professionals drawn from relevant State agencies, local governments, the cotton industry and natural resource management authorities on the governance of Natural Resource Management (NRM) policy in the Australian cotton industry. These interviewees stated that poor N...
Article
This report aims to recommend a framework for organising research and development priorities to RIRDC, as well as provide research priorities arising from a survey and tabulated information on organisations and researchers who are active in this area of research.
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First- and second-generation migrants represent about 40 per cent of the Australian population. With such a large and also diverse immigrant population, urban landscapes are significantly shaped by the gardens created by migrants. Two groups of Vietnamese and Greek migrants, in the inner suburb of Marrickville South in Sydney, were interviewed to e...
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E l Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is fundamen-tally a climatic and oceanographic phenomenon, but it has profound effects on terrestrial ecosystems as well. Although the ecological effects of ENSO are becoming increasingly known from a wide range of ter-restrial ecosystems (Holmgren et al. 2001; Wright 2005), their impacts have been most intensiv...
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Climatic changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) can have a dramatic impact on terrestrial ecosystems worldwide, but especially on arid and semiarid systems, where productivity is strongly limited by precipitation. Nearly two decades of research, including both short-term experiments and long-term studies conducted on three...
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Full-text available
Fundamentally, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a climatic and oceanographic phenomenon, but it has profound effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Although the ecological effects of ENSO are becoming increasingly known from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems (Holmgren et al., 2001), their impacts have been more intensively studied in arid an...
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Full-text available
In polyandrous social insects such as honey bees, a worker’s affinity for a particular task may be genetically infl uenced and so some patrilines may have lower stimulus thresholds for commencing a task than others. We used simulation models to investigate the effects of intracolonial diversity in the task thresholds that stimulate workers to engag...
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Full-text available
Fundamentally, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a climatic and oceanographic phenomenon, but it has profound effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Although the ecological effects of ENSO are becoming increasingly known from a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems (Holmgren et al., 2001), their impacts have been more intensively studied in arid an...
Article
Full-text available
A honey bee colony is characterized by high genetic diversity among its workers, generated by high levels of multiple mating by its queen. Few clear benefits of this genetic diversity are known. Here we show that brood nest temperatures in genetically diverse colonies (i.e., those sired by several males) tend to be more stable than in genetically u...

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Projects (4)
Project
ANdiNA (http://www.andinabbar.weebly.com) is a virtual society, an informal network that works to ensure that applied ecological research is thoroughly justified, forward-looking and of the highest standard. Particular aims are to inject good-humoured critical debate into science where it is currently lacking - communicating the outcomes via the scientific press - and to foster international dialogue, collaboration and mentoring. A priority is to help early-career scientists to engage in a substantive way with their international peers. So far, 82 people from 18 countries have participated in our workshops and are now considered to be "members".