Sona Vodenkova

Sona Vodenkova
The Czech Academy of Sciences | AVCR · Department of the Molecular Biology of Cancer

PhD

About

30
Publications
5,493
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599
Citations
Introduction
Sona Vodenkova currently works at the Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine of the Czech Academy of Sciences and in Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University. Sona does research in Molecular Oncology with the main focus on colorectal cancer, in Cytogenetics and Genetic Epidemiology. She is involved in the 'Cost Action CA 15132 hCOMET' and as an Executive Committee Member in International Comet Assay Working Group (www.icawg.com).
Additional affiliations
May 2013 - May 2020
Charles University in Prague
Position
  • PhD Student
September 2012 - July 2020
The Czech Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Metastasis Associated Lung Adenocarcinoma Transcript 1 (MALAT1), originally described as a prognostic biomarker remarkably linked with metastasis potential in lung cancer, has been identified as contributing to many diseases, including colorectal cancer (CRC). This long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has come to the forefront of lncRNA research for its im...
Article
Full-text available
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. However, little is known about the miRNA expression changes induced by the therapy in rectal cancer (RC) patients. We evaluated miRNA expression levels before and after therapy and identified specific miRNA signatures reflecting disease course and treatment responses of RC pat...
Article
Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has recently been used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting tumor-specific mutations. cfDNA may also be used for monitoring disease progression and treatment response, but so far researchers focused on one or few genes only. A genomic profile may provide better information on patient prognosis compared to single spe...
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DNA damage and unrepaired or insufficiently repaired DNA double-strand breaks as well as telomere shortening contribute to the formation of structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs). Non-specific CAs have been used in the monitoring of individuals exposed to potential carcinogenic chemicals and radiation. The frequency of CAs in peripheral blood lym...
Article
Nonspecific structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) can be found at around 1% of circulating lymphocytes from healthy individuals but the frequency may be higher after exposure to carcinogenic chemicals or radiation. The frequency of CAs has been measured in occupational monitoring and an increased frequency of CAs has also been associated with ca...
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Full-text available
Disruption of telomere length (TL) homeostasis in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been previously assessed as a potential biomarker of breast cancer (BC) risk. The present study addressed the relationship between lymphocyte TL (LTL), prognosis and clinicopathological features in the BC patients since these associations are insufficiently explored...
Article
This optimized protocol (including links to instruction videos) describes a comet-based in vitro DNA repair assay that is relatively simple, versatile, and inexpensive, enabling the detection of base and nucleotide excision repair activity. Protein extracts from samples are incubated with agarose-embedded substrate nucleoids (‘naked’ supercoiled DN...
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Full-text available
The comet assay is a widely used test for the detection of DNA damage and repair activity. However, there are interlaboratory differences in reported levels of baseline and induced damage in the same experimental systems. These differences may be attributed to protocol differences, although it is difficult to identify the relevant conditions becaus...
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Full-text available
Accumulation of non-specific structural chromo-somal aberrations (CAs) and telomere shortening contribute to genome instability, which constitutes as one of the hallmarks of cancer. CAs arise due to direct DNA damage or telomere shortening. CAs in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), which are considered to be markers of exposure, have been previous...
Article
Full-text available
DNA repair, a complex biological process, ensures genomic integrity. Alterations in DNA repair, occurring in many cancers, contribute to the accumulation of mutations in the genome, resulting in genomic instability and cancer progression. DNA repair also plays a substantial role in response to chemotherapeutics: rapidly dividing colon cancer cells,...
Article
5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is an essential component of systemic chemotherapy for colorectal cancer (CRC) in the palliative and adjuvant settings. Over the past four decades, several modulation strategies including the implementation of 5-FU-based combination regimens and 5-FU pro-drugs have been developed and tested to increase the anti-tumor activity...
Article
Non-specific structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) observed in peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy individuals can be either chromosome-type aberrations (CSAs) or chromatid-type aberrations (CTAs) depending on the stage of cell division they are induced in and mechanism of formation. It is important to study the genetic basis of chromosomal...
Article
The first-line chemotherapy of colorectal cancer (CRC), besides surgery, comprises administration of 5-Fluorouracil (5FU). Apart from cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, 5FU may also cause adverse side effects. Ganoderma Lucidum (GLC) is a mushroom used in Traditional Eastern Medicine. We propose that natural compounds, particularly GLC extracts, may...
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Full-text available
Development of lymphoid progenitors requires a coordinated regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, and gene rearrangement. Chromatin-remodeling activities directed by SWI/SNF2 superfamily complexes play important roles in these processes. In this study, we used a conditional knockout mouse model to investigate the role of Smarca5, a member...
Article
The last decade witnessed an increase in the use of comet assay for DNA damage monitoring in cancer patients and controls. Apart from case-control studies, reports described the determination of DNA damage prior to (baseline value) and after chemo-/radiotherapy, the treatment resulted in significantly elevated DNA damage. However, studies on DNA da...
Article
Colorectal carcinogenesis is a multistep process involving the accumulation of genetic alterations over time that ultimately leads to disease progression and metastasis. Binding of transcription factors to gene promoter regions alone cannot explain the complex regulation pattern of gene expression during this process. It is the chromatin structure...
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Full-text available
DNA repair processes are involved in both the onset and treatment efficacy of colorectal cancer (CRC). A change of a single nucleotide causing an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein may alter the efficiency of DNA repair, thus modifying the CRC susceptibility and clinical outcome. We performed a candidate gene approach in order to...
Article
The DNA-damaging agent 5-fluorouracil represents the most commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for colorectal cancer patients. DNA lesions associated with 5-fluorouracil therapy are primarily repaired by base excision repair (BER) and mismatch repair (MMR) pathways. Published evidence suggests that the individual DNA repair capacity (DRC) may affect...
Article
Human malignancies are often hallmarked with genomic instability, which itself is also considered a causative event in malignant transformation. Genomic instability may manifest itself as genetic changes in the nucleotide sequence of DNA, or as structural or numerical changes of chromosomes. Unrepaired or insufficiently repaired DNA double-strand b...
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Full-text available
Several studies have suggested a possible relationship between polymorphic variants of the taste receptors genes and the acceptance, liking and intake of food and beverages. In the last decade investigators have attempted to link the individual ability to taste 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and the sensations, such as astringency and bitterness, elic...
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Full-text available
Disruption of genomic integrity due to deficient DNA repair capacity and telomere shortening constitute hallmarks of malignant diseases. Incomplete or deficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is manifested by chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and their frequency reflects inter-individual differences of response to exposure to mutagenic compou...
Article
Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide with the highest incidence in Central Europe. It is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths mainly due to the late diagnosis and low efficacy of treatment. CRC diagnosed in early stage has a five-year survival rate about 90% which drops to near 12% once distant metastase...
Article
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer related deaths in Europe. Since Countries of Central Europe (Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary) have one of the highest rates both for incidence and mortality of CRC, CRC became a serious health, social and economic problem. CRC path...
Article
Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer in the world and second most common cause of cancer related deaths in Europe. Countries of Central Europe (Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary) have one of the highest rates both for incidence and mortality of CRC and this disease therefore possesses a serious health, social and ec...
Article
Human cancers arise from cells unable to maintain genomic and chromosomal stability, mainly as a sequential consequence of altered DNA repair mechanisms (base and nucleotide excision, mismatch and double-strand breaks). Chromosomal aberrations (CAs) are a marker of cancer risk and many specific CAs represent causative events in malignant transforma...
Article
Full-text available
Human cancers are often associated with numerical and structural chromosomal instability. Structural chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) arise as consequences of direct DNA damage or due to replication on a damaged DNA template. In both cases, DNA repair is critical and inter-individual differences in its capacity ar...
Article
Full-text available
Epidemiological prospective studies have shown that increased chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes may predict cancer risk. Here, we report CAs in newly diagnosed 101 colorectal, 87 lung and 158 breast cancer patients and corresponding healthy controls. Strong differences in distributions of aberrant cells (ACs), CAs, chrom...

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Projects (2)
Project
The International Comet Assay Working Group (ICAWG) was founded as a specialist interest group of the European Environmental Mutagenesis & Genomics Society (EEMGS). ICAWG exists to unite scientists working in the field of genetic toxicology, DNA damage and DNA repair with interest in the comet assay. It encompasses research into the mode-of-action of genotoxic agents and associations of genome instability markers with disease outcomes, and applications of this knowledge in the field of regulatory toxicology, biomonitoring studies, (nutritional) interventions as well as clinical studies. A topic of growing interest is the genotoxic effects of nanomaterials on humans and the environment. Studies into the impact of genotoxic agents on genome stability in organisms other than man – a field known as ecogenotoxicology – is also gaining attention. ICAWG aims to foster multi-disciplinary links between academics, industrial partners and regulatory bodies. Such multi-disciplinary collaborations have helped regulation to keep up with the science and to develop new in vitro models and techniques for genotoxicity testing.
Project
Many human biomonitoring studies have used the comet assay to measure DNA damage (some also measuring DNA repair). In most cases, the assay is applied to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results from relatively small individual studies are often inconsistent, and it is advantageous to carry out a pooled analysis of the combined data from all available studies. hCOMET will be a network comprising researchers who are active (or intend to be active) in human biomonitoring with this assay. Results supplied by these researchers will be compiled as a single database representing an estimated 19,000 individual DNA damage measurements. The pooled analysis will allow us to determine which factors (smoking, age, nutrition, sex, occupational exposure etc.) affect DNA damage, and to what extent. Fewer studies have included DNA repair capacity as an endpoint; we will collect what data we can and carry out a detailed review (or a pooled analysis if enough data). In addition, hCOMET will address the issue of inter-laboratory reproducibility of the assay by devising standard protocols, for both DNA damage and DNA repair measurement, coordinating ring studies to test these protocols, and offering training courses and exchanges, so that in future comparison of results from different studies will be facilitated. We will review applications of the assay to other human cell types and isolation methods (such as leukocytes obtained from frozen blood).