Solomon Tin Chi Chak

Solomon Tin Chi Chak
Columbia University | CU · Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology

PhD

About

30
Publications
5,626
Reads
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358
Citations
Citations since 2016
13 Research Items
291 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
Solomon Tin Chi Chak currently works at the Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, Columbia University. Solomon Tin Chi does research in Marine Biology, Evolutionary Biology and Ecology. His current project is on the genomic consequences of eusociality in snapping shrimps.
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - April 2016
York High School
Position
  • VIMS - Short Trust GK-12 Fellow
Description
  • AP and IB Biology
August 2011 - July 2016
December 2007 - July 2011
The University of Hong Kong
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Although eusocial animals often achieve ecological dominance in the ecosystems where they occur, many populations are unstable, resulting in local extinction. Both patterns may be linked to the characteristic demography of eusocial species—high reproductive skew and reproductive division of labor support stable effective population sizes that make...
Article
Across plants and animals, genome size is often correlated with life history traits: large genomes are correlated with larger seeds, slower development, larger body size, and slower cell division. Among decapod crustaceans, caridean shrimps are among the most variable both in terms of genome size variation and life history characteristics such as l...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Despite great progress in uncovering the genomic underpinnings of advanced forms of social organization like eusociality, much less is known about how eusociality feeds back to drive genome evolution. Using snapping shrimps that exhibit multiple origins of eusociality and extreme interspecific variation in genome size, we show that eus...
Article
The genus Synalpheus is a cosmopolitan clade of marine shrimps found in most tropical regions. Species in this genus exhibit a range of social organizations, including pair-forming, communal breeding, and eusociality, the latter only known to have evolved within this genus in the marine realm. This study examines the complete mitochondrial genomes...
Article
Full-text available
Eusociality is a highly conspicuous and ecologically impactful behavioral syndrome that has evolved independently across multiple animal lineages. So far, comparative genomic analyses of advanced sociality have been mostly limited to insects. Here, we study the only clade of animals known to exhibit eusociality in the marine realm – lineages of soc...
Preprint
Eusocial animals often achieve ecological dominance in the ecosystems where they occur, a process that may be linked to their demography. That is, reproductive division of labor and high reproductive skew in eusocial species is predicted to result in more stable effective population sizes that may make groups more competitive, but also lower effect...
Article
Full-text available
In the marine realm, eusociality is only known to have evolved within a clade of sponge-dwelling snapping shrimps in the genus Synalpheus. Deciphering the genomic underpinnings of eusociality in these marine shrimps has been limited by the sparse genomic resources in this genus. Here, we report, for a eusocial shrimp Synalpheus microneptunus, a com...
Article
Transposable elements (TEs)—selfish DNA sequences that can move within the genome—comprise a large proportion of the genomes of many organisms. Although low‐coverage whole genome sequencing can be used to survey TE composition, it is non‐economical for species with large quantities of DNA. Here, we utilize restriction site associated DNA sequencing...
Article
Sociality is exceedingly rare in the marine environment, with true eusociality found only within a single genus of sponge-dwelling snapping shrimp. This genus is socially diverse and exhibits multiple independent evolutionary origins of both eusociality and communal breeding from pair-forming ancestors. Ecology was critical to the evolution of shri...
Article
Animal social organization varies from complex societies where reproduction is dominated by a single individual (eusociality) to those where reproduction is more evenly distributed among group members (communal breeding). Yet, how simple groups transition evolutionarily to more complex societies remains unclear. Competing hypotheses suggest that eu...
Article
Population outbreaks of the coral-eating predator crown of thorns starfish (COTS), Acanthaster planci are responsible for large-scale disturbance of coral reefs throughout the Indo-Pacific. In response, attempts are often made to control COTS outbreaks in protected areas. For instance, volunteers remove thousands of sea stars every year in Malaysia...
Article
Full-text available
Although crustaceans vary extensively in genome size, little is known about how genome size may affect the ecology and evolution of species in this diverse group, in part due to the lack of large genome size datasets. Here we investigate interspecific, intraspecific, and intracolony variation in genome size in 39 species of Synalpheus shrimps, repr...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding why individuals within altruistic societies forgo reproduction to raise others’ offspring has fascinated scientists since Darwin. Although worker polymorphism is thought to have evolved only in sterile workers, worker subcastes appear to be common among social invertebrates and vertebrates. We asked whether sterility accompanies eusoc...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual dimorphism is typically a result of strong sexual selection on male traits used in male-male competition and subsequent female choice. However, in social species where reproduction is monopolized by one or a few individuals in a group, selection on secondary sexual characteristics may be strong in both sexes. Indeed, sexual dimorphism is red...
Chapter
Full-text available
Common in most aquatic environments, shrimps occur in a wide range of social associations with conspecific and other species, and express various levels of social recognition. We review the mechanisms and forms of social recognition in shrimps, emphasizing the Caridea. Most research has been conducted on Alpheidae, Hymenoceridae, Hippolytidae, Pala...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity has typically been described in terms of species richness and composition, but theory and growing empirical evidence indicate that the diversity of functional traits, the breadth of evolutionary relationships, and the equitability with which individuals or biomass are distributed among species better characterize patterns and processes...
Article
This study examined coral bioerosion by the sea urchin Diadema setosum at 8 sites along a north–south direction in Hong Kong. Bioerosion rate, estimated from urchin density, size distribution, gut turnover rate and CaCO3 in gut content, varied from 0.12 to 0.66 kg CaCO3 m− 2 yr− 1. The highest bioerosion rate and D. setosum density occurred at Moon...
Article
Full-text available
The tropical shrimp genus Synalpheus includes the only eusocial marine animals. In much of the Caribbean, eusocial species have dominated the diverse fauna of sponge-dwelling shrimp in coral rubble for at least the past two decades. Here we document a recent, dramatic decline and apparent local extinction of eusocial shrimp species on the Belize Ba...
Data
Composition of sponge assemblages from the Sand Bores reefs, Belize between 1996 and 2012. (XLSX)
Data
Changes in shrimp community composition through time. NMDS was performed on presence/absence data. Symbols as in Fig. 1 (TIF)
Data
Composition of Synalpheus shrimp assemblages from the Sand Bores reefs, Belize between 1996 and 2012. (XLSX)
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Biodiversity has traditionally been described in terms of species composition and richness, but theory and growing empirical evidence indicate that the diversity of functional traits and phylogenetic relationships better predict community assembly, response to environmental change, and ecosystem functioning. Most resea...
Article
In crustaceans, the presence of large males with highly developed prehensile appendages (chelipeds or gnathopods) generally is suggestive of female monopolization during her receptive period. While mate guarding is common among some malacostracan crustaceans (brachyuran crabs and some amphipod families) it is relatively rare in caridean shrimp. Her...
Article
Full-text available
This article documents the addition of 396 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Anthocidaris crassispina, Aphis glycines, Argyrosomus regius, Astrocaryum sciophilum, Dasypus novemcinctus, Delomys sublineatus, Dermatemys mawii, Fundulus heteroclitus, Homalaspis plana,...
Article
Full-text available
Variations in the relative contributions of gene flow and spatial and temporal variation in recruitment are considered the major determinants of population genetic structure in marine organisms. Such variation can be assessed through repeated measures of the genetic structure of a species over time. To test the relative importance of these two phen...
Article
Full-text available
Correspondance: Molecular Ecology Resources Primer Development Consortium, E-mail: editorial.office@molecol.com
Article
This article documents the addition of 396 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Anthocidaris crassispina, Aphis glycines, Argyrosomus regius, Astrocaryum sciophilum, Dasypus novemcinctus, Delomys sublineatus, Dermatemys mawii, Fundulus heteroclitus,Homalaspis plana, J...

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