Sofia Rüdiger

Sofia Rüdiger
University of Bayreuth · Chair of English Linguistics

Doctor of Philosophy

About

31
Publications
6,929
Reads
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144
Citations
Citations since 2017
28 Research Items
142 Citations
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Introduction
I am a linguist specialized in World Englishes, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, computer-mediated communication, corpus linguistics, and discourse analysis. I'm particularly interested in Asian Englishes (esp. East Asian Englishes), complaints and complaint responses, persuasive language, non-canonical syntax, online communities, and language and food.
Additional affiliations
February 2022 - May 2022
University of Helsinki
Position
  • Visiting scholar
March 2018 - July 2022
University of Bayreuth
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
April 2012 - February 2018
University of Bayreuth
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Full-text available
While World Englishes scholarship has always been concerned with different types of English varieties, Expanding Circle (i.e., non-postcolonial) Englishes have had a ‘late start’ in being added to its research remit. As a result, much important work in this area remains to be done. Expanding Circle Englishes in general and Asian Expanding Circle En...
Article
This editorial introduction establishes the theoretical basis for the special issue Formality and Informality in Online Performances with a focus on (in)formality, Goffman’s (1959) notion of front– and backstage and the internet as a stage, as well as the performance of self. Further attention is given to notions of self-branding, micro-celebrity,...
Article
This article examines the relatively novel genre of YouTube eating shows from the perspective of immediacy and distance, drawing on observations from an eating shows corpus and a corpus of comment replies posted by the performers. Eating show performers are confronted with a spatiotemporal separation from the recipients of their videos and thus nee...
Chapter
This chapter presents an overview of several Expanding Circle Englishes in the East Asian region with a particular focus on English in South Korea. Other regional contexts to be considered, albeit briefly, are China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Mongolia, and Japan. South Korea presents a particularly interesting case in point due to intense contact with Ame...
Article
Full-text available
In this introduction to the special issue Discourse markers and world Englishes, we briefly introduce our definition of discourse-pragmatic markers (by all means contentious items to define) and give a short overview of previous research on discourse markers in world Englishes. As the main bulk of previous research in this field has been based on m...
Article
In this paper, I investigate how the structure of and discursive performance on North American YouTube eating shows contribute to the creation of intimacy and informality. In a typical eating show, the performer eats copious amounts of food while talking to their non-copresent audience, making use of interactional registers to ‘break’ from the soli...
Article
Full-text available
This article focuses on the use of like by Korean speakers of English. South Korea is a fascinating context for world Englishes studies: English is generally learned as a foreign language, but deep political and historical ties facilitate a high visibility and prominent status of the language in Korean society. In this study, the use of like by Kor...
Chapter
In this chapter, we examine how pick-up artists (PUAs; a male community preoccupied with interacting with women) talk about women in their online discourse. To this end, we take and test three approaches: (1) introspection and elicitation, (2) manual tagging of a small specialized corpus, and (3) automatic semantic tagging and reverse collocation o...
Chapter
This chapter applies the EIF Model by Buschfeld and Kautzsch (2017) to the case of South Korea, where English has a special status due to the military involvement of the US after World War II, and where the desire for English is both strong and persistent. The continuing deployment of American soldiers to South Korea in combination with the factors...
Chapter
In this chapter, I investigate discursive practices in eating shows, so-called Mukbang, on YouTube. Originally a South Korean phenomenon, the object of this study are the globalized, Anglophone, and asynchronous instantiations of these shows. Based on a corpus of English-language eating shows, I demonstrate how the Mukbang performers construct thei...
Article
This article investigates the use of self-praise in an online community of pick-up artists (PUAs). The male community of practice engages in speed seduction of women, drawing on a shared repertoire of techniques and scripts. The field reports, which are produced to process the experienced interactions and posted online for evaluation by others, are...
Article
This paper analyzes fronting constructions in spoken Korean(ized) English. Non-canonical syntax is an important means of structuring discourse, but its use by speakers of Expanding Circle Englishes has so far received only insufficient attention in studies of World Englishes. Taking a corpus-linguistic approach, this study determines to which exten...
Book
Full-text available
Morpho-Syntactic Patterns in Spoken Korean English presents fundamental research on the use of English by South Korean speakers. Despite the extraordinary and vibrant status of the English language in South Korean society (demonstrated, for example, by the notion of English Fever), research on the forms of English in the South Korean context has be...
Article
Full-text available
This questionnaire study investigates South Korean students’ attitudes towards English loanwords and their use. Even though English enjoys high prestige in Korean society and is considered a requirement for personal and professional advancement, usage of English loanwords is evaluated predominantly negatively or with mixed feelings. For loanwords t...
Article
The idea that speaking in a certain way can make people do things – persuasion on steroids, so to say – is understandably fascinating. This holy grail of communication studies is sought after by ‘professional persuaders’, politicians and copywriters, but also in non-professional situations. One example of wishful thinking of what is possible when i...
Chapter
Englishes from expanding circle countries are often stigmatized, and deviations from so-called ‘standard’ varieties are commonly viewed as errors or mistakes. Yet such varieties demonstrate the ability of the English language to change and evolve within and across sociolinguistic boundaries. Adopting a corpus-based approach, this study focuses on o...
Article
This article explores ethical conundrums in linguistic research on online platforms populated by ‘pick-up artists’ (PUAs), a community that learns and practices speed-seduction for short-term mating. Originally a male heterosexual community, PUAs encourage men to use manipulative strategies to select, pursue, isolate and sexually conquer women (Hal...
Article
Full-text available
This study focuses on the reconstruction of experience in the online environment of the Pick-up Artist (PUA) community forums and aims to uncover yet another facet of personal narrative, namely the role and performance of framing in the reporting of events. Discursive psychologists have often pointed out that a narrative is not a precise reflection...
Article
In recent years it has become increasingly popular to study Englishes in countries traditionally belonging to the Expanding Circle of World Englishes, such as China (see e.g. He & Li, 2009), Russia (see e.g. Davydova, 2012) or the Netherlands (Edwards, 2010, 2011). South Korea (henceforth Korea) belongs to the Expanding Circle as well, which means...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
In this project, we investigate the discursive behavior of ‘pick-up artists’ (PUAs), a community of men united by learning and practicing speed seduction for short-term mating. Using corpus-driven discourse analysis we examine the language used by PUAs on various online platforms, such as forums, YouTube, and Twitter.
Project
This project investigates discursive practices in eating shows, so-called Mukbang, on YouTube. Mukbang have a Korean background as evidenced in the etymology of the term itself (a blend of the Korean words for ‘eating’ (먹는; meokneun) and ‘broadcast’ (방송; bangsong)) but have recently spread to become a global phenomenon. In a typical Mukbang recording, the YouTuber eats copious amounts of food while talking about a range of topics. Interesting here is the absence of a co-present audience during the recording, as we would find during regular dinner conversations. Nevertheless, Mukbang YouTubers construct their discourse as a conversation over food which resembles but is also different from traditional face-to-face dinner/lunch conversations. My investigation of Mukbang discourse, as a very recent phenomenon, starts with a detailed description of conversational style in order to present a first characterization of this particular speech event. Further research will focus on other phenomena, such as narrative strategies, framing and topic development, audience design, etc. The project also presents an interesting perspective on digitally mediated publics as Mukbang blur the boundaries between public and private spheres of life: Eating food is one of the basic human desires and while it is common to share food and/or the food eating experience (i.e. meeting with friends or colleagues for a meal), the public broadcasting of one’s eating as an entertainment show is a rather unprecedented trend. For this project, I draw on a corpus of 100 Anglophone Mukbang videos by ten famous eating show producers.