Sofia E. Kjellman

Sofia E. Kjellman
UiT The Arctic University of Norway · Department of Geosciences

MSc
PhD Candidate at UiT The Arctic University of Norway

About

21
Publications
4,076
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79
Citations
Introduction
PhD candidate at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, focusing on Arctic paleoclimate reconstruction. For my PhD project, I use leaf wax hydrogen isotopes in lake sediments to study gradients in Holocene precipitation seasonality and humidity on Svalbard.
Education
August 2015 - June 2017
Stockholm University
Field of study
  • Quaternary Science and Climate Development
August 2012 - June 2015
Stockholm University
Field of study
  • Environmental Science

Publications

Publications (21)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Climatic warming, diminishing sea ice, and increasing freshwater fluxes have an immense impact on the Arctic hydrological cycle. Modeling suggests that Arctic precipitation may increase by more than 50% this century, affecting freshwater budgets, ecosystems, slope processes, and glacier mass balance. Quantifying the variability in precipitation sea...
Article
Full-text available
High-latitude lakes are sensitive to climate change and store information about large-scale circulation changes and catchment-integrated processes. Lakes are mainly recharged by meteoric water, meaning that some lake sediment proxies may indirectly archive the stable isotopic composition of hydrogen (δ2H) and oxygen (δ18O) of past precipitation. Ye...
Article
Full-text available
Large rock slope failures are temporal processes which act to modify the landscape after glacial retreat. The slope failure process often shows a lag time of thousands of years after deglaciation, with multiple failure events possible. While global datasets constrain this lag time from extensive mapping and dating of paraglacial rock avalanches, th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Amplified warming in the northern high latitudes has a profound impact on the hydrological cycle. Precipitation is predicted to increase this century, but projected trends remain uncertain and rely on sparse observations to describe complex spatiotemporal patterns. Stable isotopes of oxygen (δ18O) and hydrogen (δ2H) in precipitation are sensitive t...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of colonisation is important for explaining both the distribution of single species and anticipating how ecosystems may respond to global warming. Insular flora may be especially vulnerable because oceans represent severe dispersal barriers. Here we analyse two lake sediment cores from Iceland for ancient sedimentary DNA to i...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is amplified in the Arctic, and establishing baseline data for its current character is important. Here we present a map of the geomorphology of the Femmilsjøen area, Spitsbergen, northern Svalbard. The regional physiography is characterised by a low-relief, high elevation mountain plateau, its high-relief steep slopes, and low-relie...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of colonisation is important for explaining both the distribution of single species and anticipating how ecosystems may respond to global warming. Insular flora may be especially vulnerable because oceans represent severe dispersal barriers. Here we analyse two lake sediment cores from Iceland for ancient sedimentary DNA to i...
Article
Full-text available
The response of glaciers and ice caps to past climate change provides important insight into how they will react to ongoing and future global warming. In Svalbard, the Holocene glacial history has been studied for many cirque and valley glaciers. However, little is known about how the larger ice caps in Svalbard responded to Late Glacial and Holoce...
Poster
Full-text available
Amplified warming is predicted to cause an intensification of the Arctic hydrological cycle. To improve our understanding of the dynamics controlling Arctic precipitation, we use proxy records of past precipitation seasonality. The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of sedimentary biomarkers is widely used to infer hydrological changes over long t...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic precipitation is predicted to increase in the coming century, due to a combination of enhanced northward atmospheric moisture transport and local surface evaporation from ice-free seas. However, large model uncertainties, limited long-term observations, and high spatiotemporal variability limit our understanding of these mechanisms, emphasiz...
Article
Full-text available
The deglaciation history and Holocene environmental evolution of northern Wijdefjorden, Svalbard, are reconstructed using sediment cores and acoustic data (multibeam swath bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data). Results reveal that the fjord mouth was deglaciated prior to 14.5AE0.3 cal. ka BP and deglaciation occurred in a stepwise manner. Biomar...
Article
Full-text available
Arctic hotspots, local areas of high biodiversity, are potential key sites for conservation of Arctic biodiversity. However, there is a need for improved understanding of their long-term resilience. The Arctic hotspot of Ringhorndalen has the highest registered diversity of vascular plants in the Svalbard archipelago, including several remarkable a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The 8-kilometer-long lake Femmilsjøen on the northern part of Svalbard contains an almost complete sedimentary record of the Holocene, recording the history and evolution of the >1000 km2 Åsgardfonna ice cap. Femmilsjøen is one of the largest and deepest lakes on Svalbard, and it was isolated from Wijdefjorden due to postglacial glacio-isostatic re...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research in Svalbard has provided compelling evidence for early Holocene glacier advances during a time when marine bivalves indicate that the surrounding seas were warm. The overall aim of this project is to reconstruct the Holocene climate and glacial history of northeast Spitsbergen, using a holistic approach that includes collection and...
Article
Full-text available at https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01652-2.
Article
Full-text available
Sediment cores from Kløverbladvatna, a threshold lake in Wahlenbergfjorden, Nordaustlandet, Svalbard were used to reconstruct Holocene glacier fluctuations. Meltwater from Etonbreen spills over a threshold to the lake, only when the glacier is significantly larger than at present. Lithological logging, loss-on-ignition, ITRAX scanning and radiocarb...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Recent research in Svalbard has provided compelling evidence for early Holocene glacier advances during a time when marine bivalves indicate that the surrounding seas were warm. The overall aim of this project is to reconstruct the Holocene climate and glacial history of northeast Spitsbergen, using a holistic approach that includes collection and...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Arctic precipitation is predicted to increase the coming century, proposed to be caused by atmospheric circulation changes or reduction in sea ice and resulting enhanced local surface evaporation. We aim to determine the mechanisms behind Arctic precipitation isotope variation in the past. In this study, leaf wax biomarkers are used to reconstruct...
Article
Subarctic permafrost peatlands are important soil organic carbon pools, and improved knowledge about peat properties and peatland sensitivity to past climate change is essential when predicting future response to a warmer climate and associated feedback mechanisms. In this study, Holocene peatland development and permafrost dynamics of four subarct...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Lake sediments are reliable archives for local and regional past environmental changes as they offer a wide variety of proxies that can be studied in lake sediment cores. In Iceland, tephra layers play a key role in the study of lake sediments where they serve as a powerful dating tool as well as recording past volcanic activity. The objective of this project is to shed light on explosive volcanic activity and glacier dynamics in the central highlands of Iceland by investigating sediment cores from lakes on a NE-SW transect south of the Hofsjökull ice cap and Mt. Kerlingarfjöll. The main focus of the project will be on tephrostratigraphy and –chronology involving the documentation of core stratigraphy as well as sampling and chemical analysis of tephra layers. The project will be central to the work of reconstructing past volcanic activity, glacier dynamics and environmental changes in the study area.