Smita Yadav

Smita Yadav
University of Sussex · Department of Anthropology

PhD Social Anthropology, University of Sussex

About

15
Publications
422
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15
Citations
Citations since 2016
12 Research Items
15 Citations
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
201620172018201920202021202202468
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
In this article, I demonstrate, through the use of the life course perspective, how informal work in the form of verbal wage contracts might lead to dignity and autonomy amongst the rural poor. The article draws attention to a broader comparative context of how indigenous autonomies are produced. In that they have the relative freedom to engage in...
Article
Full-text available
Studies on the informal economy in India show how precarious it is to be a migrant worker in an informal economy and how migrant workers are perpetually at risk of being exploited by market forces. They show how horizontal networks in India along the exploited class of labourers have never worked due to vertical social base (Pattenden, 2010). There...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile Lifeworlds: An Ethnography of Tourism and Pilgrimage in the Himalayas by Christopher A. Howard. Abingdon, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2017. xiii + 82 pp. Hardcover: US$ 124.00, ISBN 978-1-13-865621-5. E-book: US$ 46.36,ISBN 978-1-31-562202-6. * * * Christopher Howard's book provides a valuable study of how pilgrimages and tourism in the Himal...
Article
Full-text available
Sites of pilgrimage and heritage tourism are often sites of social inequality and volatility that are impaired by hostilities between historical, ethnic, and competing religious discourses of morality, personhood, and culture, as well as between imaginaries of nationalism and citizenship. Often these pilgrim sites are much older in national and glo...
Chapter
In this chapter, Yadav describes the kinship and lineage structure in the village of Mahalapur. She discusses the different family systems joint/separated families and how they get restructured and reorganised to meet their basic needs. She studies how family households are organised to maximise their options of earning and how one household choose...
Chapter
In this chapter, Yadav provides an overview of the Panna district in the village of Mahalapur, where the Gonds live. She describes the geographical, historical and cultural significance of the region for Hindu religion and Indian society. Later, she will explain its political and administrative structure and how it is related to the everyday lives...
Chapter
I conclude by summarising the main points and questions that I set out at the beginning of the book. The book, so far, has taken a more extreme view of the informal economy compared to Marxists, social developmentalists and the neoclassical thinkers. The Gonds, who do unskilled wage work in affluent states of India and for whom, informal work is co...
Chapter
Yadav describes the various work/employment options available and how the work comes to them and what is the meaning of work for the Gonds. She discusses ethnographies of work of the Gonds and how they construct around their livelihood strategies around these work options. She questions the nature of this relationship. For this, she analyses the di...
Chapter
In this chapter, Yadav describes the contemporary lives of the Gonds and the surrounding region. She shows how the Gonds have adapted to recent changes in the wider political economy by culturally appropriating many Rajput characteristics as a result of the integration with the wider society. Later, she compares Gonds with other communities in the...
Chapter
Yadav introduces how the Gonds are caught up in the battle between the Human and Tiger in Panna and how that currently shapes their livelihood options. She focuses on postcolonial institutions of governance, market, economy, and forests in the village and compares the experience of the Gonds, the works of other scholars who have worked on displacem...
Chapter
In this chapter, Yadav will talk about the state itself. She shows how the state is an important agent of development for the Gonds; this is for both social transformation and empowerment purposes. The various development regimes or schemes, known as yojnas (social schemes), will also be discussed. She questions the critical role of the neoliberal...
Article
An empirical account of one of India’s largest indigenous populations, this book tells the story of the Gonds—who currently face displacement and governmental control of the region’s forests, which has crippled their economy. Rather than protesting and calling for state intervention, the Gonds have turned toward an informal economy: they not only e...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (M.S.)--George Mason University, 2004. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 117-131). Vita: leaf 132.