Sjon Hartman

Sjon Hartman
University of Freiburg | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg · Faculty of Biology

PhD

About

34
Publications
17,861
Reads
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570
Citations
Citations since 2016
34 Research Items
570 Citations
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Introduction
In our lab we study the spatiotemporal dynamics of flooding signals (Ethylene, oxygen, nitric oxide, ROS, light) and how they mediate plant stress responses and development. Moreover, we are interested in how prior flooding events control plant development and stress responses during subsequent flooding stress, a process we call flooding stress memory. For more info: https://www.hartman-plantlab.com
Additional affiliations
December 2021 - present
University of Freiburg
Position
  • Group Leader
Description
  • In our lab we study the spatiotemporal dynamics of flooding signals and how they mediate plant stress responses and development. Moreover, we are interested in how prior flooding events control plant development and stress responses during subsequent flooding stress, a process we call flooding stress memory. For more info: https://www.hartman-plantlab.com
December 2020 - December 2021
University of Birmingham
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Unraveling the role of VRN2 on epigenetic regulation and stress memory during plant flooding
September 2019 - November 2020
Utrecht University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • The role of ethylene for hypoxia acclimation in plants
Education
September 2015 - September 2019
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Plant Science
September 2013 - August 2015
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Environmental Biology - Plant Science
September 2010 - September 2013
Utrecht University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) regulates epigenetic gene repression in eukaryotes. Mechanisms controlling its developmental specificity and signal-responsiveness are poorly understood. Here, we identify an oxygen-sensitive N-terminal (N-) degron in the plant PRC2 subunit VERNALIZATION(VRN) 2, a homolog of animal Su(z)12, that promotes its...
Article
Full-text available
Timely perception of adverse environmental changes is critical for survival. Dynamic changes in gases are important cues for plants to sense environmental perturbations, such as sub-mergence. In Arabidopsis thaliana, changes in oxygen and nitric oxide (NO) control the stability of ERFVII transcription factors. ERFVII proteolysis is regulated by the...
Article
Full-text available
Submerged plants ultimately suffer from shortage in cellular oxygen availability (hypoxia) as a result of impaired gas diffusion underwater. The gaseous plant hormone ethylene is rapidly entrapped in submerged plant tissues and is an established regulator of morphological and anatomical flood‐adaptive responses. Multiple recent discoveries suggest...
Article
Full-text available
Ethylene aplenty signals soil compaction It's tough to drive a spade through compacted soil, and plant roots seem to have the same problem when growing in compacted ground. Pandey et al. found that the problem is not, however, one of physical resistance but rather inhibition of growth through a signaling pathway. The volatile plant hormone ethylene...
Article
Full-text available
Flooded plants experience impaired gas diffusion underwater, leading to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). The volatile plant hormone ethylene is rapidly trapped in submerged plant cells and is instrumental for enhanced hypoxia acclimation. However, the precise mechanisms underpinning ethylene-enhanced hypoxia survival remain unclear. We studied the eff...
Article
Full-text available
Protein synthesis is an essential but energetically expensive cellular process that is challenged under environmental stress in plants. Recent work demonstrates that the plant hormone ethylene, through GCN2, represses general translation during flooding stress to conserve energy. Moreover, ethylene also promotes the translation of specific stress-r...
Article
Full-text available
Soil compaction represents a major agronomic challenge, inhibiting root elongation and impacting crop yields. Roots use ethylene to sense soil compaction as the restricted air space causes this gaseous signal to accumulate around root tips. Ethylene inhibits root elongation and promotes radial expansion in compacted soil, but its mechanistic basis...
Article
Full-text available
Plants compete for light when growing at close proximity and detect shading from neighboring vegetation through decreases in light availability and in the red: far-red light ratio (R:FR). Changes in R:FR are sensed by specialized photoreceptors called phytochromes that trigger morphological changes known as the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). SAS i...
Article
Full-text available
Soil flooding creates low-oxygen environments in root zones and thus severely affects plant growth and productivity. Plants adapt to low-oxygen environments by a suit of orchestrated metabolic and anatomical alterations. Of these, formation of aerenchyma and development of adventitious roots are considered very critical to enable plant performance...
Preprint
Full-text available
Flooded plants experience impaired gas diffusion underwater, leading to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). The volatile plant hormone ethylene is rapidly trapped in submerged plant cells and is instrumental for enhanced hypoxia acclimation. However, the precise mechanisms underpinning ethylene-enhanced hypoxia survival remain unclear. We studied the eff...
Article
Full-text available
Since the initial discovery of ethylene as a biologically active gaseous molecule in plants by Neljubov in 1901 (Kende, 1998), over a century of research has highlighted the importance of gas signaling for organisms to control molecular and physiological responses. Oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are two gases critical for both plant development...
Article
Full-text available
Low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions can occur in hypoxic niches during normal plant development or as a result of plant submergence. Hypoxia limits mitochondrial respiration and causes a serious drop in available energy. To ensure cell survival during hypoxia, plants typically switch on alternative energy producing pathways that don’t require oxygen, s...
Cover Page
Full-text available
A submerged Solanum dulcamara seedling. Image is part of a photo series by Iris Hartman and published in Hartman JGW. 2020. The early flooding signal ethylene acclimates plants to survive low‐oxygen stress, PhD thesis, https://dspace.library.uu.nl/handle/1874/387763. Read more about New Phytologist covers in the ‘Behind the cover’ blog: newphytolog...
Article
Full-text available
Avoiding the shade of neighboring plants is essential to optimize light capture and fuel photosynthesis. Shade avoidance is typically sensed through changes in light quality, is mediated by the activity of phytochromes, and modulates other plant stress responses. The inactivation of phytochrome B by shade allows Phytochrome Interacting Factor (PIF)...
Article
Full-text available
Ripening of climacteric fruits such as banana (Musa acuminata), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and mango (Mangifera indica) is typically triggered and regulated by the gaseous plant hormone ethylene (Seymour et al.,2013; Hu et al., 2019). As a gas, ethylene levels and subsequent signal transduction in plants can be regulated by changes in biosynthe...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing occurrence of floods hinders agricultural crop production and threatens global food security. The majority of vegetable crops are highly sensitive to flooding and it is unclear how these plants use flooding signals to acclimate to impending oxygen deprivation (hypoxia). Previous research has shown that the early flooding signal ethyl...
Article
Full-text available
At least 80% of eukaryotic proteins are estimated to undergo N-terminal acetylation (NTA), making it likely that your favorite protein is also regulated by NTA. This transfer of an acetyl group to the N terminus can modulate a protein’s interaction partners, i.e. folding, localization, aggregation, and degradation. NTA is catalyzed by several disti...
Article
Full-text available
Even moderate droughts can greatly limit plant performance and reduce agricultural yield. Plants have evolved a wide range of traits to acclimate to drought, and enhancing these traits could improve drought tolerance in crops. One promising trait is the formation of the so-called rhizosheath under drought. The rhizosheath is the soil that remains s...
Thesis
Full-text available
Anthropogenic climate change has contributed to a significant increase in the frequency and severity of flooding events worldwide. Floods have a devastating impact on plant biodiversity and agricultural crop productivity, challenging global food security. In order to enhance flooding tolerance in crops, it is crucial to understand the processes tha...
Data
This Supplementary Information file contains: Supplementary Figures 1-10 Supplementary Table 1 (Genotyping primers) Supplementary Table 2 (RT-qPCR primers)
Preprint
Full-text available
Timely perception of adverse environmental changes is critical for survival. Dynamic changes in gases are important cues for plants to sense environmental perturbations, such as submergence. In Arabidopsis thaliana, changes in oxygen and nitric oxide (NO) control the stability of ERFVII transcription factors. ERFVII proteolysis is regulated by the...
Poster
Full-text available
The increasing frequency of floods due to climate change has devastating effects on agricultural productivity worldwide. Due to restricted gas diffusion underwater, flooded plants experience cellular oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) and survival strongly depends on molecular responses that enhance hypoxia tolerance. In submerged plant tissues limited g...
Article
Full-text available
Flooding is detrimental for nearly all higher plants including crops. The compound stress elicited by slow gas exchange and low light levels under water is responsible for both a carbon and an energy crisis ultimately leading to plant death. The endogenous concentrations of four gaseous compounds: oxygen, carbon dioxide, ethylene and nitric oxide,...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change has increased the frequency and severity of flooding events with significant negative impact on agricultural productivity. These events often submerge plant aerial organs and roots, limiting growth and survival due to a severe reduction in light reactions and gas exchange necessary for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. To...

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The aim of the project is to unravel how epigenetic changes contribute to flooding stress tolerance in plants. In addition, we explore whether the uncovered processes contribute to long term flooding stress memory.
Archived project
As an Assistant Features Editor of Plant Physiology I aim to shine a spotlight on the latest exciting research published in the journal and make it more accessible to a broad range of readers.