Sinlan Poo 蒲歆嵐

Sinlan Poo 蒲歆嵐
Memphis Zoo · Conservation and Research

PhD, National University of Singapore
Senior Research Scientist at the Memphis Zoo; Adjunct Research Faculty at Arkansas State University.

About

26
Publications
5,325
Reads
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183
Citations
Introduction
Dr. Sinlan Poo is a Research Scientist at the Memphis Zoo with an Adjunct position at Arkansas State University. Originally from Taiwan, she is a behavioral ecologist who is broadly interested in parental care, reproductive ecology, and phenotypic plasticity. Her research is primarily focused on amphibians, but she has worked on a wide range of research and conservation projects targeting small mammals, carnivores, invertebrates, and rare plants in the US, Neotropics, and Southeast Asia.
Additional affiliations
November 2019 - present
Arkansas State University - Jonesboro
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
October 2019 - present
Memphis Zoo
Position
  • Researcher
July 2016 - October 2019
Memphis Zoo
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
March 2011 - January 2017
Smithsonian Institution
Field of study
  • Smithsonian Mason School of Conservation
January 2010 - October 2014
September 2003 - September 2007
Boston University
Field of study
  • Ecology and Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
The arboreal frog, Chiromantis hansenae (Family: Rhacophoridae), is one of only a handful of South‐East Asian amphibian species reported with parental care. We present the first systematic observational and experimental study confirming offspring benefits as a result of this care, which has a number of unusual life‐history characteristics. Eggs are...
Article
Full-text available
Predation is one of the main drivers of behavioral adaptation in prey. In species with parental care, predation can affect survival of both adults and the offspring under their care. This effect can be further modulated by or combined with other factors that contribute to mating and reproductive success of adults, such as the quality of their breed...
Article
Full-text available
With increasing rates of global biodiversity decline, strategies such as reintroduction or supplementation, have become increasingly important in conserving our remaining biodiversity. To sustain reintroduction programs, insurance colonies are established and bred in captivity. Captive-bred offspring are then released to augment wild populations or...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation translocation using captive‐bred individuals has become increasingly important for species restoration. Despite advancements in technologies for captive‐breeding, such as gamete cryopreservation, it remains largely unknown if these artificially‐produced offspring can be used to establish a viable wild population. Using an amphibian spe...
Article
Full-text available
Zoos and natural history museums are both collections-based institutions with important missions in biodiversity research and education. Animals in zoos are a repository and living record of the world's biodiversity, whereas natural history museums are a permanent historical record of snapshots of biodiversity in time. Surprisingly, despite signifi...
Article
Full-text available
To date, all captive breeding of the dusky gopher frog, Lithobates sevosus, a federally listed endangered species, has been accomplished using in vitro fertilization (IVF). Here, we describe multievent and highly fecund captive reproduction of dusky gopher frogs driven solely by natural environmental factors. Six pairs of L. sevosus were kept in a...
Article
Amphibian populations are declining worldwide, and increased exposure to environmental stressors, including global climate change and pathogens like Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), may be contributing to this decline. Our goal was to use a novel dermal swabbing method to measure glucocorticoid (GC) hormones and investigate the relationship amo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Oviposition sites selected by parents is an important factor that affects offspring survival and parental fitness. A good nest site offers offspring protection from competition, predation, and harsh environmental conditions. In amphibians, though oviposition sites are generally determined by females, the distinction between male and female choice c...
Article
A decline in sperm quality with age is a common prediction of senescence-based hypotheses and empirical studies. While widely studied across taxa, there is little known on the effect of ageing on sperm quality in amphibians, especially in captive populations used for controlled propagation and reintroduction efforts. Here, we investigated variation...
Article
Small, isolated populations often experience increased inbreeding and decreased heterozygosity, which increases the potential risk of inbreeding depression. The relationship between inbreeding and sperm health is well‐documented in a variety of taxa, but has yet to be explored in amphibians. The dusky gopher frog, Lithobates sevosus, is a criticall...
Article
Full-text available
Novel conservation methods have become increasingly important in protecting our remaining biodiversity in the face of unprecedented rates of species declines. One method of maintaining genetic and species diversity is through germplasm cryopreservation. However, our knowledge of cryopreservation relies heavily on studies in domestic or aquaculture...
Article
Global amphibian declines have fueled an increased interest in amphibian assisted reproductive technologies. Within the genus Rhaebo, half of the species are experiencing decreasing population trends; however, insufficient information is available on many of these species’ reproductive biology. Using the smooth-sided toad, Rhaebo guttatus, we prese...
Article
Hibernation is an integral part of the life history of species living in seasonal environments. However, our knowledge about the link between hibernation and reproductive success in amphibians remains limited, which poses an obstacle for critical conservation efforts. To fill this gap, we quantified the effects of captive hibernation on sperm quali...
Article
Full-text available
Background Lowland areas in tropical East and Southeast Asia have a long history of conversion from forestland to agricultural land, with many remaining forests being chronically degraded by wood cutting, livestock grazing, and burning. Wetland-breeding amphibians that have evolved in lowland forests in the region have adjusted to changes in habita...
Data
Amphibian data from Hong Kong Raw data from Hong Kong on body condition of Duttaphrynus melanostictus, larval growth and survival of Microhyla fissipes, and embryonic survival of Polypedates melanostictus.
Data
Amphibian data from Thailand Raw data from Thailand on body condition of Duttaphrynus melanostictus, larval growth and survival of Microhyla heymonsi, and embryonic survival of Polypedates leucomystax.
Article
Full-text available
Predator and prey relationships are dynamic and interrelated. Thus, any offensive behaviour will vary according to differing defensive behaviours, or vice versa, within each species in any predator–prey system. However, most studies are one-sided as they focus on just one behaviour, that of either the predator or prey. Here, we examine both predato...
Article
Full-text available
Hatching, the life history switch point between embryonic and larval or subadult stages, has traditionally been regarded as a fixed event in an organism's development. This notion has been challenged by reports of environmentally cued hatching in recent years, which show embryos improve fitness by hatching in response to mortality risks. Here, we p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Background/Question/Methods The relationship between predator and prey is one that is constantly evolving. Dynamics of this interaction are fundamental to our understanding of behavior in both species. However, majority of studies only focus on examining behavior from the predator’s or prey’s perspective. A particular type of predator-prey intera...
Article
Full-text available
Most animals encourage independence in their offspring at the earliest possible date. Invariably, the goal is to minimize energy output and maximize offspring survival. Parental investment tends to evolve only when offspring’s survival is jeopardized by environmental threats that attentive parenting can mitigate, such as hungry predators, scarce or...
Article
Full-text available
Chinese—English bilinguals residing in the US were interviewed about their experience of using emotional expressions. They judged L1-Mandarin expressions as feeling stronger than L2-English expressions. Respondents nonetheless preferred to express their emotions in English, citing more relaxed social constraints in English-speaking environments. El...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
50 authors (one per country) from different cultures and backgrounds will share their journey in life and career to put a spotlight on the diversity of women in herpetology around the world. We hope this effort will encourage the next generation of herpetologists to follow their dreams. Website: https://www.womeninherpetology.com/