Sinead Mullally

Sinead Mullally
Newcastle University | NCL · Institute of Neuroscience

About

41
Publications
13,431
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2,281
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
1524 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250

Publications

Publications (41)
Preprint
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Childhood Adversity (CA) is one of the strongest factors associated with the onset of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and both CA and MDD have been linked to altered hippocampal structure/function. The current study aimed to explore the relationships between retrospectively reported childhood emotional neglect (CEN), current wellbeing and depressi...
Article
Full-text available
Since the publication of Scoville and Milner's (1957) seminal paper, the precise functional role played by the hippocampus in support of human memory has been fiercely debated. For instance, the single question of whether the hippocampus plays a time‐limited or an indelible role in the recollection of personal memories led to a deep and tenacious s...
Article
Full-text available
Reading fiction for pleasure is robustly correlated with improved cognitive attainment and other benefits. It is also in decline among young people in developed nations, in part because of competition from moving image fiction. We review existing research on the differences between reading or hearing verbal fiction and watching moving image fiction...
Preprint
Full-text available
Since the publication of Scoville and Milner's (1957) seminal paper, the precise functional role played by the hippocampus in support of human memory has been fiercely debated. For instance, the single question of whether the hippocampus plays a time-limited or an indelible role in the recollection of personal memories led to a deep and tenacious s...
Article
Full-text available
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus have been implicated in the mental construction of scenes and events. However, little is known about their specific contributions to these cognitive functions. Boundary extension (BE) is a robust indicator of fast, automatic, and implicit scene construction. BE occurs when individuals who a...
Article
Full-text available
The hippocampus is one of the most closely scrutinized brain structures in neuroscience. While traditionally associated with memory and spatial cognition, in more recent years it has also been linked with other functions, including aspects of perception and imagining fictitious and future scenes. Efforts continue apace to understand how the hippoca...
Article
Both episodic memory and the key neural structure believed to support it, namely the hippocampus, are believed to undergo protracted periods of postnatal developmental. Critically however, the hippocampus is comprised of distinct subfields and circuits, and these circuits appear to mature at different rates (Lavenex and Banta Lavenex, 2013). Utilis...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, evidence has accumulated to suggest the hippocampus plays a role beyond memory. A strong hippocampal response to scenes has been noted, and patients with bilateral hippocampal damage cannot vividly recall scenes from their past or construct scenes in their imagination. There is debate about whether the hippocampus is involved in th...
Article
Full-text available
We often engage in counterfactual (CF) thinking, which involves reflecting on 'what might have been'. Creating alternative versions of reality seems to have parallels with recollecting the past and imagining the future in requiring the simulation of internally-generated models of complex events. Given that episodic memory and imagining the future a...
Chapter
The fifth edition of a work that defines the field of cognitive neuroscience, with entirely new material that reflects recent advances in the field. Each edition of this classic reference has proved to be a benchmark in the developing field of cognitive neuroscience. The fifth edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences continues to chart new directions...
Article
Full-text available
Major depression can be associated with neurocognitive deficits which are believed in part to be related to medial temporal lobe pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate this impairment using a hippocampal-dependent neuropsychological task. The face-name pairs task was used to assess associative memory functioning in 19 patients with...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past 60 years the neural correlates of human episodic memory have been the focus of intense neuroscientific scrutiny. By contrast, neuroscience has paid substantially less attention to understanding the emergence of this neurocognitive system. In this review we consider how the study of memory development has evolved. In doing so, we conce...
Article
Full-text available
Amnesic patients with bilateral hippocampal damage sustained in adulthood are generally unable to construct scenes in their imagination. By contrast, patients with developmental amnesia (DA), where hippocampal damage was acquired early in life, have preserved performance on this task, although the reason for this sparing is unclear. One possibility...
Article
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Background: Thyroid hormones are important for the adult brain, particularly regions of the hippocampus including the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 regions. The hippocampus is a thyroid hormone receptor-rich region of the brain involved in learning and memory. Consequently, alterations in thyroid hormone levels have been reported to impair hippoca...
Article
Full-text available
We currently lack a unified and mechanistic account of how the hippocampus supports a range of disparate cognitive functions that includes episodic memory, imagining the future, and spatial navigation. Here, we argue that in order to leverage this long-standing issue, traditional notions regarding the architecture of memory should be eschewed. Inst...
Article
Full-text available
On the face of it, memory, imagination, and prediction seem to be distinct cognitive functions. However, metacognitive, cognitive, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence is emerging that they are not, suggesting intimate links in their underlying processes. Here, we explore these empirical findings and the evolving theoretical frameworks tha...
Article
Full-text available
It has recently been observed that certain objects, when viewed or imagined in isolation, evoke a strong sense of three-dimensional local space surrounding them (space-defining (SD) objects), while others do not (space-ambiguous (SA) objects), and this is associated with engagement of the parahippocampal cortex (PHC). But activation of the PHC is c...
Article
Cognitive processes do not occur in isolation. Interactions between cognitive processes can be observed as a cost in performance following a switch between tasks, a cost that is greatest when the cognitive requirements of the sequential tasks compete. Interestingly, the long-term mnemonic goals associated with specific cognitive tasks can also dire...
Article
Full-text available
Boundary extension (BE) is a pervasive phenomenon whereby people remember seeing more of a scene than was present in the physical input, because they extrapolate beyond the borders of the original stimulus. This automatic embedding of a scene into a wider context supports our experience of a continuous and coherent world, and is therefore highly ad...
Article
Full-text available
Landmarks are critical components of our internal representation of the environment, yet their specific properties are rarely studied, and little is known about how they are processed in the brain. Here we characterised a large set of landmarks along a range of features that included size, visual salience, navigational utility, and permanence. When...
Data
Preliminary evidence for RSC engagement by item permanence. Unpublished data from [30] showed preliminary evidence for an association between RSC activity and item permanence. (DOCX)
Data
Further examples of the stimuli. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, there has been substantial interest in how the human hippocampus not only supports recollection of past experiences, but also the construction of fictitious and future events, and the leverage this might offer for understanding the operating mechanisms of the hippocampus. Evidence that patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and...
Article
The posterior parahippocampal cortex (PHC) supports a range of cognitive functions, in particular scene processing. However, it has recently been suggested that PHC engagement during functional MRI simply reflects the representation of three-dimensional local space. If so, PHC should respond to space in the absence of scenes, geometric layout, obje...
Article
Full-text available
When we view a scene, we construct an internal representation of the scene that extends beyond its given borders. This cognitive phenomenon is revealed by a subsequent memory error when we confidently misremember the extended scene instead of the original. This effect is known as "boundary extension" and is apparent in adults, children, and babies....
Article
Physical activity has been reported to improve cognitive function in humans and rodents, possibly via a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-regulated mechanism. In this study of human subjects, we have assessed the effects of acute and chronic exercise on performance of a face-name matching task, which recruits the hippocampus and associated s...
Article
Full-text available
The debate surrounding the function of the human posterior parahippocampal cortex (PHC) is currently dominated by two competing theories. The spatial layout hypothesis proposes that PHC processes information about the shape of space embodied in layout-defining scene features. The contextual association hypothesis rejects this notion, proposing inst...
Article
Full-text available
Background Repeated rehearsal is one method by which verbal material may be transferred from short- to long-term memory. We hypothesised that extended engagement of memory structures through prolonged rehearsal would result in enhanced efficacy of recall and also of brain structures implicated in new learning. Twenty-four normal participants aged 5...
Article
Full-text available
Declarative memory largely depends upon normal functioning temporal lobes (hippocampal complex) and prefrontal cortex. Animal studies suggest abnormal hippocampal function in hypothyroidism. The aim of the study was to assess declarative memory in overt and subclinical (SCH) hypothyroid patients before and after l-T(4) (LT4) replacement and in matc...
Article
According to self-categorization theory (Oakes, Haslam, & Turner, 1994), stereotypes vary to reflect variations in the comparative context within which they are formed. In this study we explore stereotype variability in a sample of 5- and 7-year-old children. Participants described a specific out-group, and then described the in-group (that is ‘boy...

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