Simone Rowe

Simone Rowe
UNSW Sydney | UNSW · School of Law Society and Criminology

BSW (Hons Class 1); PhD Candidate (Current)

About

17
Publications
6,759
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
149
Citations
Introduction
Simone Rowe is Research Associate and Scientia PhD candidate at UNSW, Australia. Her doctoral research is an inter-disciplinary theoretical and empirical exploration of the experiences of people with cognitive disability who are subject to processes of criminalisation.

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Amidst the increase in protest, activism and scholarship about police violence and repression in recent years, considerations of disability and ableism continue to be relegated to the margins. This article draws on interviews with leading disability justice advocates in Australia to shed light on the nature of police interactions with people with d...
Research
Full-text available
This project targets critical knowledge and practice gaps to build The Disability Royal Commission’s knowledge and evidence base about police responses to people with disability, and how they can be improved. The project: • Examines innovative models/alternatives to police as first responders, • Takes an evidence-based approach in examining police...
Chapter
The chapter argues for building a bridge between critical disability studies and penal abolitionism. Doing so enhances our capacity to conceptualise and resist the intersecting forces that have created one of the fastest growing groups in the penal estate: people with cognitive disability and/or mental health problems. The chapter unfolds in four m...
Article
The provision of appropriate education, training, and employment supports for incarcerated people is pivotal to mitigating the risk of recidivism, to improving rehabilitative outcomes, and to securing employment upon release. People with cognitive disability are disproportionately represented in prisons internationally. The vast majority of this gr...
Article
As critical discussions on the internationalisation of social work continue, the importance of preparing social work students undertaking international study is increasingly recognised. This article describes the preparation process developed for a group of Australian students undertaking international study experiences in Asia. In particular, the...
Research
Full-text available
This report identifies and provides evidence of the key challenges and concerns associated with current NDIS policy and practice for people with cognitive disability and complex needs who are involved with the criminal justice system
Article
This article explores the epistemological and methodological challenges posed by Indigenous peoples to the sociology of deviance, and in particular the field of criminology. The article argues that there has emerged a comprehensive challenge by Indigenous intellectuals and activists to Western social science paradigms. We set out the major concerns...
Article
Full-text available
The increasing valorisation of Indigenous knowledges, methodologies and approaches to social work renders visible the inadequacy of western approaches to the praxis of research by non-Indigenous social workers researching with Indigenous peoples. Non-Indigenous social workers often are unaware of the colonising and racist assumptions underpinning t...
Chapter
This chapter is part of a broader project we refer to as the ‘penal/colonial complex’ — a project that seeks to delineate, decentre and challenge the dominant mechanisms through which law, policy and practice continue to subjugate Indigenous peoples, their cultures and their knowledges (Cunneen et al. 2013, pp. 186–187; Cunneen and Rowe 2014). We s...
Article
There is growing recognition in criminology and social work of the importance of Indigenous knowledges and methodologies. Yet to date there have been limited attempts (particularly in criminology and criminal justice social work) to consider the theoretical and practice implications of Indigenous understandings and approaches to these disciplines....
Article
Full-text available
There is growing recognition in criminology and social work of the importance of Indigenous knowledges and methodologies. Yet to date there have been limited attempts (particularly in criminology and criminal justice social work) to consider the theoretical and practice implications of Indigenous understandings and approaches to these disciplines....
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter is part of a broader project we refer to as the “penal/colonial complex”; a project that seeks to delineate, de-centre and challenge the dominant mechanisms through which law, policy and practice continue to subjugate Indigenous peoples, their cultures and knowledges. We see the need to de-centre victimology at both a theoretical and p...
Chapter
Full-text available
For years prior to and following the significant work of the Australian National Committee on Violence (NCV), the subject of Australian Indigenous people and violence has attracted intense focus and debate. Some two and a half decades ago, the NCV report stressed the need to understand the complex nature of the causes of violence in contemporary In...
Conference Paper
Continued interest in providing Australian social work students with international study opportunities has led to consideration of how best to prepare such students for these cross-cultural experiences. In this paper the authors reflect on the process involved in developing an online module focused on ‘inter-cultural learning’. This module is one c...

Network

Cited By