Simon Maddock

Simon Maddock
University of Wolverhampton · School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science

Doctor of Philosophy

About

58
Publications
29,465
Reads
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290
Citations
Additional affiliations
November 2011 - April 2014
University College London
Position
  • PhD Student
October 2011 - April 2014
Natural History Museum, London
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
September 2007 - August 2011
Bangor University
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (58)
Chapter
An expansion of the use of molecular data in the 21st C has accompanied a greatly increased number of amphibian and reptile species descriptions. Some of the newly discovered or recognised diversity has been considered ‘cryptic’. Islands and island endemic taxa represent worthwhile systems to address questions about cryptic species. Being comprised...
Preprint
Acquiring DNA from wild bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) is typically undertaken utilizing highly invasive (but non-lethal) sampling techniques comprising wing biopsies and occasional blood samples. While non-invasive sampling is possible through the extraction of DNA from faecal samples, it is not always possible to acquire samples from individual bats...
Article
Full-text available
Over three decades after the establishment of the Birmingham and Black Country Bat Group, the results of just a few years of targeted advanced surveys at woodland sites in the green belt of the county have begun to challenge the misconceptions of bat assemblages in urban areas. The data from the Urban Bat Project have altered the distribution maps...
Article
Full-text available
We assess the availability of four names proposed by Wells & Wellington (1985) for Australian death adders (Acanthophis). In agreement with previous literature, A. hawkei is an available name, whereas A. armstrongi, A. lancasteri, and A. schistos are not described in conformity with the requirements of Articles 13.1.1 or 13.1.2 of the International...
Preprint
Full-text available
Whole mitochondrial genomes have been helpful in estimating phylogenetic relationships in many organismal groups, including caecilian amphibians. Despite the increasing ease of obtaining mitochondrial genome sequences from high-throughput sequencing, several species of caecilian lack this important molecular resource. As part of a targeted-sequence...
Article
Full-text available
Phylogenetic relationships of sub-Saharan African natricine snakes are understudied and poorly understood, which in turn has precluded analyses of the historical biogeography of the Seychelles endemic Lycognathophis seychellensis. We inferred the phylogenetic relationships of Seychelles and mainland sub-Saharan natricines by analysing a multilocus...
Article
Full-text available
There is a lack of precise guidelines concerning the survey effort required for advanced bat surveys in temperate European woodlands, resulting in a lack of standardisation in survey methods. In this study we assess catch data from 56 bat trapping surveys at 11 UK woodland sites in order to provide recommendations for mist net survey effort require...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Island systems offer excellent opportunities for studying the evolutionary histories of species by virtue of their restricted size and easily identifiable barriers to gene flow. However, most studies investigating evolutionary patterns and processes shaping biotic diversification have focused on more recent (emergent) rather than ancie...
Article
Full-text available
Traditionally, two species of slender loris have been recognized, viz. the red slender loris Loris tardigradus, with two subspecies from Sri Lanka and the grey slender loris L. lydekkerianus, with four subspecies from Sri Lanka and India. In 2017, two more subspecies were described from Sri Lanka (L. t. parvus and L. l. uva) on the basis of morphol...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Island systems offer excellent opportunities for studying the evolutionary histories of species by virtue of their restricted size and easily identifiable barriers to gene flow. However, most studies investigating evolutionary patterns and processes shaping biotic diversification have focused on more recent (emergent) rather than ancien...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Island systems offer excellent opportunities for studying the evolutionary histories of species by virtue of their restricted size and easily identifiable barriers to gene flow. However, most studies investigating evolutionary patterns and processes shaping biotic diversification have focused on more recent (emergent) rather than ancien...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Island systems offer excellent opportunities for studying the evolutionary histories of species by virtue of their restricted size and easily identifiable barriers to gene flow. However, most studies investigating evolutionary patterns and processes shaping biotic diversification have focused on more recent (emergent) rather than ancien...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Island systems offer excellent opportunities for studying the evolutionary histories of species by virtue of their restricted size and easily identifiable barriers to gene flow. However, most studies investigating evolutionary patterns and processes shaping biotic diversification have focused on more recent (emergent) rather than ancien...
Article
Full-text available
Since 1984 there have been no records of Rhaebo colomai (Hoogmoed, 1985) within the territory of Ecuador. This species was known from 2 localities in the province of Carchi, northwestern Ecuador, and the department of Nariño, southwestern Colombia, which were reported in 1979 and 2015, respectively. We report the recent sightings of R. colomai at 3...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptic diversity corresponding with island of origin has been previously reported in the endemic, geographically restricted sooglossid frogs of the Seychelles archipelago. The evolutionary pattern behind this has not been fully explored, and given current amphibian declines and the increased extinction risk faced by island species, we sought to id...
Article
Full-text available
Cryptic diversity corresponding with island of origin has been previously reported in the endemic, geographically restricted sooglossid frogs of the Seychelles archipelago. The evolutionary pattern behind this has not been fully explored, and given current amphibian declines and the increased extinction risk faced by island species, we sought to id...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of indotyphlid caecilian amphibian, Hypogeophis montanus sp. nov., is described based on a series of specimens from the Seychelles island of Mahé, collected from two localities in 2013 and 2015. The new species most closely resembles the Seychelles (Mahé) endemic H. brevis in being short (maximum known total length in life ca. 110 mm)...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of indotyphlid caecilian amphibian, Hypogeophis pti sp. nov., is described based on a series of specimens from the Seychelles island of Praslin. The type series was collected in 2013 and 2014, and a referred specimen previously identified as H. brevis Boulenger, 1911 was collected from an unspecified Seychelles locality in 1957. The n...
Article
Full-text available
The Seychelles archipelago is unique among isolated oceanic islands because it features an endemic radiation of caecilian amphibians (Gymnophiona). In order to develop population genetics resources for this system, we identified microsatellite loci using unassembled Illumina MiSeq data generated from a genomic library of Grandisonia alternans, a sp...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Cyrtodactylus (Geckoella) from the C. collegalensis complex is described based on a series of specimens from western and central India. Morphological and molecular data support the distinctiveness of the new form, which can be diagnosed from other Cyrtodactylus (including other Geckoella) species by its small body size (snout to ve...
Article
Genetic analyses of Australasian organisms have resulted in the identification of extensive cryptic diversity across the continent. The venomous elapid snakes are among the best-studied organismal groups in this region, but many knowledge gaps persist: for instance, despite their iconic status, the species-level diversity among Australo-Papuan blac...
Article
Full-text available
Mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences are being generated with increasing speed due to the advances of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and associated analytical tools. However, detailed comparisons to explore the utility of alternative NGS approaches applied to the same taxa have not been undertaken. We compared a 'tra-ditional' S...
Conference Paper
This thesis investigates evolutionary patterns of variation in endemic amphibians from the Seychelles archipelago. Focal groups include the treefrog (Tachycnemis seychellensis), and a radiation of caecilians in three genera (Grandisonia, Hypogeophis and Praslinia), and attempts to place these into a phylogenetic context. The introduction (Chapter 1...
Article
Full-text available
The cloud-forests of the Western Ecuadorean Andes are highly diverse and under threat from anthropogenic habitat disturbance. Reptiles are sensitive to habitat change and are therefore useful indicators of ecosystem state. Overall diversity has been shown to be highest in old-growth (primary) forest, although older secondary forests can recover to...
Article
Full-text available
Australian death adders (genus Acanthophis) are highly venomous snakes with conservative morphology and sit-and-wait predatory habits, with only moderate taxonomic diversity that nevertheless remains incompletely understood. Analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences and morphological characteristics of death adders in northern Australia...
Article
Full-text available
For amphibians, non-lethal sampling methods have been developed and evaluated for only two of the three extant orders, with the limbless caecilians (Gymnophiona) thus far overlooked. Here we assess 16 different methods in five caecilian species representing five families with differing morphologies and ecologies. DNA was successfully extracted and...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of Riama lizard from the western slopes of the Andes in northern Ecuador is described herein. Morpholog-ically, Riama yumborum sp. nov. can be distinguished from all other congenerics by having an incomplete nasoloreal su-ture and a cylindrical hemipenial body with diagonally orientated flounces on its lateral aspect. Phylogenetic ana...
Article
Full-text available
In species-rich tropical forests, effective biodiversity management demands measures of progress, yet budgetary limitations typically constrain capacity of decision makers to assess response of biological communities to habitat change. One approach is to identify ecological-disturbance indicator species (EDIS) whose monitoring is also monetarily co...
Article
Full-text available
The hyperoliid frog Tachycnemis seychellensis, the only species of its genus, is endemic to the four largest granitic islands of the Seychelles archipelago and is reliant on freshwater bodies for reproduction. Its presence in the Seychelles is thought to be the product of a transoceanic dispersal, diverging from the genus Heterixalus, its closest l...
Article
Full-text available
Anonymous nuclear markers were developed for Seychelles caecilian amphibians. Using a previously published bioinformatics pipeline (developed for Roche 454 data), 36 candidate anonymous nuclear loci (ANL) of at least 180 bp length were identified from Illumina MiSeq next generation sequencing data for five Seychelles species. We designed primer pairs...
Article
Full-text available
Chrysopelea taprobanica Smith, 1943 was previously considered to be endemic to the dry and intermediate zones of Sri Lanka. However, an adult specimen of C. taprobanica was collected from Seshachalam Biosphere Reserve of Andhra Pradesh, India, being the first record of this snake species from India, significantly extending the known range of distri...
Article
Full-text available
Sepsophis punctatus Beddome 1870, the only species of a monotypic genus, was described based on a single specimen from the Eastern Ghats of India. We rediscovered the species based on specimens from Odisha and Andhra Pradesh state, India, after a gap of 137 years, including four specimens from close to the type locality. The holotype was studied in...
Article
Sepsophis punctatus Beddome 1870, the only species of a monotypic genus, was described based on a single specimen from the Eastern Ghats of India. We rediscovered the species based on specimens from Odisha and Andhra Pradesh state, India, after a gap of 137 years, including four specimens from close to the type locality. The holotype was studied in...
Article
Full-text available
Sepsophis punctatus Beddome 1870, the only species of a monotypic genus, was described based on a single specimen from the Eastern Ghats of India. We rediscovered the species based on specimens from Odisha and Andhra Pradesh state, India, after a gap of 137 years, including four specimens from close to the type locality. The holotype was studied in...
Article
Full-text available
defensive behaviour is, in general, poorly understood, although several authors have reviewed the wide range of antipredator strategies employed (Greene 1988, 1997; and Lillywhite and Henderson, 1993). Body-bending behaviour is described as "a cryptic defensive behaviour in arboreal snakes" (Marques, Rodrigues and Sazima, 2006). It is believed to r...

Questions

Questions (3)
Question
Does anybody know how to export landmarks placed in Drishti into the correct format ready to import into MorphoJ? - or a tool that can convert formats? I can't seem to find answers in any documentation.
Thanks in advance!
Simon
Question
Has anybody been extracting (or has extracted) DNA from faecal samples using a DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit? How does it compare to the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit? I have done several extractions using the DNeasy kit and (according to the nanodrop) they have provided good DNA yields and are seemingly clean. Has anybody had any major post-extraction issues from extracted faecal samples from DNeasy kits?
Thanks!
Simon
Question
I'm looking to set up temperature and humidity data loggers in the tropics and was wondering what people find are the most reliable and cost effective available at the moment? Ideally these will be left out for one month to a year.
Thanks in advance!
Simon

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Looking at species assemblages, movement and roost selection by bats on the urban fringe.
Project
With confirmed support from The Mohamed bin Zayed Species Conservation Fund, we aim to establish a long-term monitoring programme for the enigmatic sooglossid frogs of Seychelles. Our aim is for sooglossid conservation to be managed entirely in-country. Some key objectives we aim to deliver in support of this are; training and capacity building to ensure ongoing, continued monitoring of the frogs; document the extent of occurrence of the multi-distributed populations; estimate population size(s); establish and maintain disease monitoring activities; and provide support for strategic planning in order to generate an operational conservation action plan for the Sooglossidae.