Simon J. Lambert

Simon J. Lambert
University of Saskatchewan | U of S · Indigenous Studies

PhD
Researching disaster risk reduction (DRR) and Indigenous communities; biosecurity; and environmental management.

About

45
Publications
29,970
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
534
Citations
Introduction
Associate Professor in Indigenous Studies, University of Saskatchewan. Currently researching in Indigenous environmental management, planning and development, and Indigenous disaster risk reduction, and Indigenous cultural diplomacy.
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - November 2020
NEIHR (Network Environments for Indigenous Health Research) National Coordinating Centre
Position
  • Managing Director
December 2016 - March 2020
University of Saskatchewan
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2010 - November 2016
Lincoln University New Zealand
Position
  • Lecturer

Publications

Publications (45)
Chapter
Emergencies imply urgency as people are confronted by time-sensitive demands in response to an actual or perceived crisis. Yet so-called natural disasters are anything but natural and are predictable within limits. Any examination of a disaster reveals socially-constructed vulnerabilities that put minorities, women and children, the poor, migrants,...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Approximately 1 in 3 Canadians will experience an addiction or mental health challenge at some point in their lifetime. Unfortunately, there are multiple barriers to accessing mental health care, including system fragmentation, episodic care, long wait times, and insufficient support for health system navigation. In addition, stigma ma...
Article
The COVID‐19 pandemic highlights the urgency and importance of monitoring, managing and addressing zoonotic diseases, and the acute challenges of doing so with sufficient inter‐jurisdictional coordination in a dynamic global context. Although wildlife pathogens are well‐studied clinically and ecologically, there is very little systematic scholarshi...
Article
Full-text available
Poor access to care is a top patient-oriented research priority for youth with chronic pain in Canada, and the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these concerns. Our patient-oriented project team engaged with marginalized and racialized youth with chronic pain (Black youth with sickle cell disease, Indigenous youth and youth with complex medical nee...
Chapter
Full-text available
Colonization can be interpreted as a disaster with a fixed beginning but an indeterminate end, whose very purpose was to dispossess, disarm and, if necessary, destroy Indigenous Peoples. Disasters therefore continue to fall disproportionately on disempowered Indigenous communities, families, and individuals-and Indigenous vulnerability is the corol...
Chapter
Full-text available
Just as disasters are indissolubly social events, in settler colonial societies, vulnerabilities to hazards, and the impacts from consequent disasters, are inextricably racist. Are Indigenous disasters, like the Bible’s portrayal of the poor (Mathew 26:11; Mark 14:7), “always with us”? As Matthewman (2015) points out, disasters “lift the veil” on h...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Approximately 1 in 3 Canadians will experience an addiction or mental health challenge at some point in their lifetime. Unfortunately, there are multiple barriers to accessing mental health care, including system fragmentation, episodic care, long wait times, and insufficient support for health system navigation. In addition, stigma may...
Article
Full-text available
The United Nations Sendai Framework 2015-30 for disaster risk reduction (DRR) reaffirms the role of Indigenous Knowledges (IK) as complementing and contributing to more effective DRR. This hard won space for IK comes as Indigenous communities voluntarily contribute to the local management of disasters, including wildfire and threats to biodiversity...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing racism continues to violently impact on the cultures, lands, and bodies of Indigenous Peoples. While many health researchers are meeting the ethical challenges in working with Indigenous communities, this commentary draws attention to the often-uncritical adaption or use of digital tools. Many digital technologies, deliberately or accidentl...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing racism continues to violently impact on the cultures, lands, and bodies of Indigenous Peoples. While many health researchers are meeting the ethical challenges in working with Indigenous communities, this commentary draws attention to the often-uncritical adaption or use of digital tools. Many digital technologies, deliberately or accidentl...
Article
Full-text available
With more frequent and more intense disasters, disaster risk reduction (DRR) has become increasingly important as a fundamental approach to sustainable development. Indigenous communities hold a unique position in DRR discourse in that they are often more vulnerable than non-Indigenous groups and yet also hold traditional knowledges that enable a g...
Research
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
As Aotearoa New Zealand grapples with developing solutions to complex issues surrounding its unique freshwater and marine biological heritage, there is a growing recognition that mātauranga Māori can be ‘unlocked’ and used with great effect alongside western science. Examples where appropriate consideration and development of robust methodologies f...
Chapter
Full-text available
It is widely acknowledged that Indigenous peoples have traditional knowledge relevant to modern environmental management. By asserting roles within associated science and policy networks, such Indigenous Knowledge (IK) can be seen as part of the resistance to colonisation that includes protest, treaty making, political and economic empowerment, leg...
Article
One of the great challenges for indigenous and non-indigenous entrepreneurs in the twenty-first century is to move beyond profit maximisation as an acceptable modality for doing business and gravitate towards the concept of socially optimal outcomes, where maximising community well-being and minimising externalities to the natural environment and s...
Article
Full-text available
This article outlines illustrative applications in the use of QCA and its fuzzy-set variant in three examples of business promotion in New Zealand in the establishment of ethnic business networks, new land-based ventures, and the success and failure of end-user innovation. The three studies offer insights into the genesis of ideas, assembly of busi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This initiative is a follow-up project from the The Risk Interpretation and Action Fellows Seminar, which was held in December, 2013, in New Zealand. This seminar was coordinated by the WSS Fellows program of the International Social Science Council (ISSC), the RIA working group of the Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR) program, the IRDR I...
Conference Paper
Modern Indigenous development sees an ever-widening array of players engage with corporate organisations in the extraction of wealth from Indigenous land and waters. In Aotearoa New Zealand, extensive personal and professional links now connect Maori individuals and collectives into capitalist systems of production. This paper presents a Social Net...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples possess ancient wisdom and valuable knowledge on environmental hazards and disasters. Much of this knowledge is relevant to non-Indigenous Peoples. As current concerns on disaster risk reduction emphasise a multi-level, multinational approach, Indigenous knowledge can help international, regional, national and local organisations...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report presents research on the affects of the Ōtautahi/Christchurch earthquakes of 2010 to 2012 on the city’s Tangata Whaiora community, ‘people seeking health’ as Māori frame mental health clients. Drawing on the voices of 39 participants of a Kaupapa Māori provider (Te Awa o te Ora), this report presents extended quotes from Tangata Whaiora...
Technical Report
Full-text available
‘Tangata whaiora’ translates as ‘people seeking health’. The term is sourced from Te Ao Māori where it refers to people with experience of mental illness (Russell, 2006, pp. viii, fn 4) and is increasingly a ‘preferred term’ for consumers of mental health services from a consumer perspective (Moeke-Maxwell, Wells, & Mellsop, 2008). Support for Tang...
Article
Full-text available
The disastrous earthquakes that struck Christchurch in 2010 and 2011 seriously impacted on the individual and collective lives of Māori residents. This paper continues earlier, predominantly qualitative research on the immediate effects on Māori by presenting an analysis of a survey carried out 18 months after the most destructive event, on 22 Febr...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper presents insights into the impacts on Māori of the Christchurch earthquakes, and draws on personal research experiences to discuss disaster research with impacted minority communities. Three topics are discussed. The first is the role of Indigenous Knowledge (IK) in disasters. If IK such as Mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) is to be ‘in...
Presentation
Full-text available
This is a public lecture I gave at Victoria University (Wellington, NZ) in 2014 at the invitation of Prof. Ilan Noy, Chair in the Economics of Disasters.
Article
Full-text available
Indigenous Peoples retain traditional coping strategies for disasters despite the marginalisation of many Indigenous communities. This article describes the response of Māori to the Christchurch earthquakes of 2010 and 2012 through analyses of available statistical data and reports, and interviews done three months and one year after the most damag...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The application of stated preference non-market valuation approaches in settings where there are strong cultural differences in environmental perspectives potentially misrepresent strengths of preferences for different groups. This paper reports on a study that measured strength of affiliation with traditional Māori identity, strength of connection...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The 2010 and 2011 earthquakes of Canterbury have had a serious and ongoing effect on Mäori in the city (Lambert, Mark-Shadbolt, Ataria, & Black, 2012a). Many people had to rely on themselves, their neighbours and their whänau for an extended period in 2011, and some are still required to organise and coordinate various activities such as schooling,...
Article
Full-text available
The Ahuwhenua Trophy is awarded in an annual contest for the Māori Farmer-of-the-Year and was first held in 1932. The competition was initially between small-scale family farms and continued government modernisation strategies for Māori farmers, their families, and their tribal land. Judged on social as well as management and productivity criteria,...
Article
Full-text available
Since the early 1990s a number of projects have developed indexes to measure vulnerability to environmental change. This article investigates the key conceptual and methodological problems associated with such indexes. It examines in detail an index that explicitly addresses environmental change as an issue of vulnerability, the Environmental Vulne...
Article
Full-text available
Within innovation diffusion literature, indigenous peoples have historically been described as ‘laggards’: slow to adopt new technologies. While accepted as the originators of acceptably ‘quaint’ traditions, Māori, like other indigenous peoples, are targeted as passive adopters of new, and theoretically, beneficial innovations. However within susta...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Māori representation within postgraduate ranks has increased dramatically over the past few years. Within this group, those initiating research degrees often find themselves isolated from traditional whanau/hapu/iwi support, particularly during the actual writing. Reports suggest the retention of Māori into postgraduate study and the completion of...
Article
Full-text available
Although biotechnology has been an integral component of human history, contemporary research now operates with a precision and level of expertise that marks a significant break from previous understanding. By enabling the manipulation of the basic 'building blocks' of life, biotechnology sciences have had profound impacts in the humanities, includ...
Article
Full-text available
The return of Māori land to a productive role in the New Economy entails the innovation and diffusion of technologies relevant to the sustainable development of this land. Sustainable development requires substantive changes to current land and resource use to mitigate environmental degradation and contribute to ecological and sociological resilien...
Article
Full-text available
The interaction between science and policy in the management of the environment in the Pacific region has seen it subject to different interpretations, practices and policies. Importantly, this has exposed the lack of capacity to mitigate environmental degradation in the region, and the need for accurate assessment and monitoring of environmental c...
Article
Full-text available
Technological innovation by the actual users of technologies is receiving more attention, and deservedly so, as these users combine their passions and expertise into improving the technologies which they employ in their personal and professional lives. This report documents technology users’ innovation (TUI) as an important source of inventions whi...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
A year long study of Indigenous mental health support in an urban post-disaster context.