Simon Hellemans

Simon Hellemans
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | OIST · Evolutionary Biology and Ecology Unit

PhD

About

18
Publications
3,156
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
102
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
102 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
20162017201820192020202120220510152025
Additional affiliations
November 2021 - present
Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
November 2019 - October 2021
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2015 - September 2019
Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (FNRS)
Position
  • Fellow
Education
September 2015 - April 2019
Université Libre de Bruxelles
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology
September 2013 - June 2015
Université Libre de Bruxelles
Field of study
  • Organismic Biology and Ecology

Publications

Publications (18)
Article
The phylogenetic history of termites has been investigated using mitochondrial genomes and transcriptomes. However, both sets of markers have specific limitations. Mitochondrial genomes represent a single genetic marker likely to yield phylogenetic trees presenting incongruences with species trees, and transcriptomes can only be obtained from well-...
Article
Full-text available
Termites feed on vegetal matter at various stages of decomposition. Lineages of wood- and soil-feeding termites are distributed across terrestrial ecosystems located between 45°N and 45°S of latitude, a distribution they acquired through many transoceanic dispersal events. While wood-feeding termites often live in the wood on which they feed and ar...
Article
Full-text available
Termites are major decomposers in terrestrial ecosystems and the second most diverse lineage of social insects. The Kalotermitidae form the second-largest termite family and are distributed across tropical and subtropical ecosystems, where they typically live in small colonies confined to single wood items inhabited by individuals with no foraging...
Article
Termites are social cockroaches distributed throughout warm temperate and tropical ecosystems. The ancestor of modern termites roamed the earth during the early Cretaceous, suggesting that both vicariance and overseas dispersal may have shaped the distribution of early diverging termites. We investigate the historical biogeography of three early di...
Article
Full-text available
Significance The evolution of asexuality is thought to be prevented when males play a critical role beyond that of gamete provision. We demonstrated high numbers of neo-sex chromosomes and enhanced heterozygosity in males of the termite Glyptotermes nakajimai , which appears to compensate for inbreeding within termite colonies. Furthermore, we show...
Preprint
Full-text available
The phylogenetic history of termites has been investigated using mitochondrial genomes and transcriptomes. However, both sets of markers have limitations. Mitochondrial genomes represent a single genetic marker likely to yield phylogenetic trees presenting incongruences with species trees, and transcriptomes can only be obtained from well-preserved...
Preprint
Full-text available
Madagascar is home to many endemic plant and animal species owing to its ancient isolation from other landmasses. This unique fauna includes several lineages of termites, a group of insects known for their key role in organic matter decomposition in many terrestrial ecosystems. How and when termites colonised Madagascar remains unknown. In this stu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Termites are social cockroaches distributed throughout warm temperate and tropical ecosystems. The ancestor of modern termites (crown-Isoptera) occurred during the earliest Cretaceous, approximately 140 million years ago, suggesting that both vicariance through continental drift and overseas dispersal may have shaped the distribution of early diver...
Article
The phylogeny of the genus Cubitermes Wasmann was reconstructed using two mitochondrial genes (COI and COII) and a fragment of the nuclear 28S rDNA, including samples of Apilitermes Holmgren, Crenetermes Silvestri, Megagnathotermes Silvestri and Thoracotermes Wasmann. Based on our analyses, we recovered these genera within a paraphyletic Cubitermes...
Chapter
Termite species from phylogenetically distant lineages were shown to combine both sexual and parthenogenetic reproductions, in a breeding system dubbed as ‘asexual queen succession’. Queens of these species use sexual reproduction for the production of the workforce and dispersers, and thelytokous parthenogenesis for the production of nondispersing...
Article
1. Connectivity loss during habitat fragmentation poses a serious threat to global biodiversity. The effects of this process depend on factors such as the dispersal ability and breeding systems of each species, the type of land use surrounding the habitat remnants and the position of fragments in the landscape. 2. Termites are abundant in tropical...
Article
Full-text available
Termites are eusocial insects having evolved several feeding, nesting and reproductive strategies. Among them, inquiline termites live in a nest built by other termite species: some of them do not forage outside the nest, but feed on food stored by the host or on the nest material itself. In this study, we characterized some dimensions of the ecolo...
Article
Full-text available
Background A decade ago, the mixed reproductive strategy Asexual Queen Succession (AQS) was first described in termites. In AQS species, the workers, soldiers and dispersing reproductives are produced through sexual reproduction, while non-dispersing (neotenic) queens arise through automictic thelytokous parthenogenesis, replace the founding queen...
Article
Some species of termites evolved an outstanding reproductive strategy called asexual queen succession (AQS), in which the primary queen is replaced by multiple parthenogenetically produced daughters (neotenics) that mate with the primary king. When the primary king is eventually replaced, this time by sexually produced neotenic king(s), sex-asymmet...
Article
Wolbachia has deeply shaped the ecology and evolution of many arthropods, and interactions between the two partners are a continuum ranging from parasitism to mutualism. Non-dispersing queens of the termite Cavitermes tuberosus are parthenogenetically produced through gamete duplication, a mode of ploidy restoration generally induced by Wolbachia....
Article
Since the inception of Linnaean taxonomy, termite species and genus descriptions have been mostly based on the morphology of soldiers, sometimes complemented by alate characters, though these are seldom discriminant. However, narrowly soldier-based descriptions may overemphasise ancestral characters and lead to the establishment of non- monophyleti...
Article
Termite colonies are typically founded by a pair of sexually reproducing dispersers, which can sometimes be replaced by some of their offspring. Some Reticulitermes and Embiratermes species routinely practice asexual queen succession (AQS): the queen is replaced by neotenic daughters produced by parthenogenesis, which mate with the primary king. He...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
Facultative asexual reproduction - Genetic diversity - Secondary queens - Reproductive parasites - Symbiosis - Bacteriome - Gut microbiota