Simeon Lisovski

Simeon Lisovski
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research | AWI · Polar Terrestrial Environmental Systems

PhD

About

81
Publications
33,918
Reads
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1,861
Citations
Citations since 2017
62 Research Items
1553 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
2017201820192020202120222023050100150200250300
Introduction
I am a global change biologist at www.awi.de and Geo.X with special interest in bird migration, seasonality and host-pathogen itneractions.
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - present
Swiss Ornithological Institute
Position
  • PostDoc Position
May 2016 - April 2017
University of California, Davis
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2015 - April 2016
Deakin University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
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Synopsis: Seasonality describes cyclic and largely predictable fluctuations in the environment. Such variations in day length, temperature, rainfall, and resource availability are ubiquitous and can exert strong selection pressure on organisms to adapt to seasonal environments. However, seasonal variations exhibit large scale geographical divergen...
Article
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1.Migratory birds are an increasing focus of interest when it comes to infection dynamics and the spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV). However, we lack detailed understanding migratory birds’ contribution to local AIV prevalence levels and their downstream socio‐economic costs and threats. 2.To explain the potential differential roles of migra...
Article
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1) Many migratory goose populations have thrived over the past decades and their reliance on agricultural resources has often led to conflicts. Control and management measures are sought after but since migratory geese use several sites in their annual cycle, local management actions should consider their potential effects further down the flyway....
Article
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1.Light‐level geolocator tags use ambient light recordings to estimate the whereabouts of an individual over the time it carries the device. Over the past decade, these tags have emerged as an important tool and have been used extensively for tracking animal migrations, most commonly small birds. 2.Analysing geolocator data can be daunting to new a...
Article
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The continental‐scale distribution of plant functional types, such as evergreen and summergreen needle‐leaf forest, is assumed to be determined by contemporary climate. However, the distribution of summergreen needle‐leaf forest of larch (Larix Mill.) differs markedly between the continents, despite relatively similar climatic conditions. The reaso...
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Climate change is leading to the advancement of spring conditions, resulting in an earlier snowmelt and green‐up, with highest rates of change in highly seasonal environments, including alpine habitats. Migratory birds breeding at high elevations need to time their arrival and lay dates accurately with this advancement, but also with the annually v...
Article
The northern wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe has an almost circumpolar breeding distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, but all populations migrate to sub‐Saharan Africa in winter. Currently, tracking data suggest two main access routes to the northern continents via the Middle East and the Iberian Peninsula. These routes would require detours for bird...
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Most of our understanding of the ecology and evolution of avian influenza A virus (AIV) in wild birds is derived from studies conducted in the northern hemisphere on waterfowl, with a substantial bias towards dabbling ducks. However, relevant environmental conditions and patterns of avian migration and reproduction are substantially different in th...
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Arctic Terns (Sterna paradisaea) share a few routes to undertake the longest annual migrations of any organism. To understand how the wide spatial range of their breeding colonies may affect their migration strategies (e.g., departure date), we tracked 53 terns from five North American colonies distributed across 30° of latitude and 90° of longitud...
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Background: In migratory species, the extent of within- and between-individual variation in migratory strategies can influence potential rates and directions of responses to environmental changes. Quantifying this variation requires tracking of many individuals on repeated migratory journeys. At temperate and higher latitudes, low levels of within-...
Preprint
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Host susceptibility to parasites is mediated by intrinsic and external factors such as genetics, age or season. While key features have been revealed for avian influenza A virus (AIV) in waterfowl of the Northern Hemisphere, the role of host phylogeny has received limited attention. Herein, we analysed 12339 oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs and 1082...
Article
East Asian songbirds are known to migrate along two major corridors: from mainland Eurasia via China to SouthEast Asia, and from Japan and easternmost Russia through chains of islands in the Pacific to Indonesia and the Philippines. We successfully tracked the hitherto unknown migration of a Blue-and-white Flycatcher Cyanoptila cyanomelana breeding...
Preprint
Full-text available
Most of our understanding of the ecology and evolution of avian influenza A virus (AIV) in wild birds is derived from studies conducted in the northern hemisphere on waterfowl, with a substantial bias towards dabbling ducks. However, relevant environmental conditions and patterns of avian migration and reproduction are substantially different in th...
Article
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In seasonal environments subject to climate change, organisms typically show phenological changes. As these changes are usually stronger in organisms at lower trophic levels than those at higher trophic levels, mismatches between consumers and their prey may occur during the consumers’ reproduction period. While in some species a trophic mismatch i...
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Sexual segregation, the differential space, habitat or resource use by males and females, can have profound implications for conservation, as one sex may be more vulnerable to environmental and anthropogenic stressors. The drivers of sexual segregation, such as sex differences in body size, breeding constraints, and social behaviour, have been well...
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Globally, bird migration is occurring earlier in the year, consistent with climate-related changes in breeding resources. Although often attributed to phenotypic plasticity, there is no clear demonstration of long-term population advancement in avian migration through individual plasticity. Using direct observations of bar-tailed godwits ( Limosa l...
Article
The Arctic tern is an iconic seabird, famous for its annual migrations between the Arctic and the Antarctic. Its wide geographical range has impeded knowledge of potential population bottlenecks during its annual bi-hemispheric movements. Although Arctic terns breed in the Pacific, Atlantic, and Arctic coasts of North America, few tracking studies...
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Timing reproduction to coincide with optimal environmental conditions is key for many organisms living in seasonal habitats. Advance in the onset of spring is a particular challenge to migratory birds that must time their arrival without knowing the conditions on the breeding grounds. This is amplified at high elevations where resource availability...
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Aim The configuration of the earth's landmasses influences global weather systems and spatiotemporal resource availability, thereby shaping biogeographical patterns and migratory routes of animals. Here, we aim to identify potential migratory barriers and corridors, as well as general migration strategies within the understudied Indo‐European flywa...
Article
Technological advances offer new ways to investigate the contribution that changing climate and genes have made in shaping past migrations by peregrine falcons. Can this help to predict the fate of future migrations? How climate and genes have shaped migration by peregrine falcons.
Article
Australian lineages of avian influenza A viruses (AIVs) are thought to be phylogenetically distinct from those circulating in Eurasia and the Americas, suggesting the circulation of endemic viruses seeded by occasional introductions from other regions. However, processes underlying the introduction, evolution and maintenance of AIVs in Australia re...
Preprint
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A steady advance in the onset of spring is one of the most prominent footprints of climate warming and requires organisms, including migratory birds, to adapt their annual routines. As lower trophic levels typically adapt faster than higher trophic levels, observations of reduced fitness due to trophic mismatches are becoming more frequent, especia...
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Many birds wintering in the Indian subcontinent fly across the Himalayas during migration, including Bar-headed Geese (Anser indicus), Demoiselle Cranes (Anthropoides virgo) and Ruddy Shelducks (Tadorna ferruginea). However, little is known about whether shorebirds migrate across the Himalayas from wintering grounds beyond the Indian subcontinent....
Article
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Many migratory birds are declining worldwide. In line with the general causes for the global biodiversity crisis, habitat loss, pollution, hunting, over-exploitation and climate change are thought to be at the basis of these population declines. Long-distance migrants seem especially vulnerable to rapid anthropogenic change, yet, the rate of declin...
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Aim: Knowledge of broad-scale biogeographical patterns of animal migration is important for understanding ecological drivers of migratory behaviours. Here, we present a flyway-scale assessment of the spatial structure and seasonal dynamics of the Afro-Palaearctic bird migration system and explore how phenology of the environment guides long-distanc...
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Currently, the deployment of tracking devices is one of the most frequently used approaches to study movement ecology of birds. Recent miniaturisation of light‐level geolocators enabled studying small bird species whose migratory patterns were widely unknown. However, geolocators may reduce vital rates in tagged birds and may bias obtained movement...
Article
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Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5Nx viruses of the goose/Guangdong/96 lineage continue to cause outbreaks in poultry and wild birds globally. Shorebirds, known reservoirs of avian influenza viruses, migrate from Siberia to Australia along the East-Asian-Australasian Flyway. We examined whether migrating shorebirds spending nonbreeding sea...
Article
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White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) populations of western North America exhibit dramatic differences in life history strategies including migration behavior. However, individual migration strategies and population-level migratory patterns remain largely unknown for this species. Here, we focused on the long-distance migratory subspecies...
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As a key parameter in population dynamics, mortality rates are frequently estimated using mark–recapture data, which requires extensive, long‐term data sets. As a po‐ tential rapid alternative, we can measure variables correlated to age, allowing the compilation of population age distributions, from which mortality rates can be de‐ rived. However,...
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The tracking of birds using light-level geolocators has become a relatively frequent technique in the study of migratory shorebirds. The geolocator program, commenced in Australia by the Victorian Wader Studies Group in 2009, has provided insights into many of the strategies and outcomes of the species studied. The most numerous of these studies ha...
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Birds that are long-distance migrants partition their annual cycle among a number of locations over a large spatial range. The conservation of these species is particularly complex because it requires attention to a number of different and distant habitats based on knowledge of migratory phenology, routes and staging areas. In the case of the globa...
Article
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Solar geolocation has become one of the most frequently used tools in wader migration research. Geolocators provide location estimates based on recorded light intensities, and more specifically, on the changes in light during the twilight periods, allowing an increase in knowledge on how waders migrate across the globe. Yet, quite a number of speci...
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Seabirds face diverse threats on their breeding islands and while at sea. Human activities have been linked to the decline of seabird populations, yet over-wintering areas typically receive little or no protection. Adult survival rates, a crucial parameter for population persistence in long-lived species, tend to be spatially or temporally restrict...
Article
Thousands of species migrate [1]. Though we have some understanding of where and when they travel, we still have very little insight into who migrates with whom and for how long. Group formation is pivotal in allowing individuals to interact, transfer information, and adapt to changing conditions [2]. Yet it is remarkably difficult to infer group m...
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Common Terns (Sterna hirundo) breeding at inland lakes in North America have experienced significant population declines since the 1960s. Although management actions aimed at mitigating effects of habitat loss and predation have been largely effective, numbers continue to decline, which suggests that the population may be limited during the nonbree...
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The Paddyfield Warbler Acrocephalus agricola has recently expanded its breeding range westwards to the western coast of the Black Sea. Although its non-breeding range is known (southern Iran to northern Myanmar), current knowledge on how individual birds migrate and how their routes evolve alongside range expansion processes is very limited. Data f...
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Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD), a highly contagious cancer, has decimated Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) numbers in the wild. To ensure its long-term survival, a captive breeding program was implemented but has not been as successful as envisaged at its launch in 2005. We therefore investigated the reproductive success of 65 captive dev...
Article
In their 2015 Current Biology paper, Streby et al. [1] reported that Golden-winged Warblers (Vermivora chrysoptera), which had just migrated to their breeding location in eastern Tennessee, performed a facultative and up to “>1,500 km roundtrip” to the Gulf of Mexico to avoid a severe tornadic storm. From light-level geolocator data, wherein geogra...
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Background Migrants have been hypothesised to use different migration strategies between seasons: a time-minimization strategy during their pre-breeding migration towards the breeding grounds and an energy-minimization strategy during their post-breeding migration towards the wintering grounds. Besides season, we propose body size as a key factor i...
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Migration is a common phenomenon across many animal taxa. Understanding how migration scales with body size across species is fundamental in the development of migration theory and in making size-related predictions. Although aerodynamic theory and ecophysiological scaling laws have assisted greatly in generating such predictions, their verificatio...
Article
Seasonality is a critically important aspect of environmental variability, and strongly shapes all aspects of life for organisms living in highly seasonal environments. Seasonality has played a key role in generating biodiversity, and has driven the evolution of extreme physiological adaptations and behaviors such as migration and hibernation. Fluc...
Article
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The Blackcap Sylvia atricapilla is a model species for the evolution of bird migration in a time of global change. However, many assumptions about putative changes to their migratory paths have not been verified because, until recently, it has not been possible to track individual small passerines throughout the entire migration cycle. With the rec...
Article
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As global climate change progresses, the occurrence of potentially disruptive climatic events such as storms are increasing in frequency, duration and intensity resulting in higher mortality and reduced reproductive success. What constitutes an extreme climatic event? First we point out that extreme climatic events in biological contexts can occur...
Article
Migratory birds encounter a broad range of pathogens during their journeys, making them ideal models for studying immune gene evolution. Despite the potential value of these species to immunoecology and disease epidemiology, previous studies have typically focused on their adaptive immune gene repertoires. In this study, we examined the evolution o...
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Background: Predicting the consequences of continuing anthropogenic changes in the environment for migratory behaviours such as phenology remains a major challenge. Predictions remain particularly difficult, because our knowledge is based on studies from single-snapshot observations at specific stopover sites along birds’ migration routes. However,...
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The previous discoveries of the rock bunting Emberiza cia in Jena, beginning with the by now con rmed observations by J. M. Bechstein (1795), are described. On July 13th 1996 hahn und Rein- haRdt (1997) were able to record the rst breeding observation in Thuringia on a limestone slope in the Saale valley near Jena, the second evidence of nesting wa...
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Seabirds show remarkable variability in migration strategies among individuals and populations. In this study we analysed 47 migrations of 28 brown skuas Catharacta antarctica lonnbergi breeding on King George Island in the Maritime Antarctic. Brown skuas from this population used a large area during the non-breeding period north of 55°S, including...
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The Great Knot Calidris tenuirostris is one of the iconic long-distance migratory species of the East Asian-Australasian Flyway. However, despite extensive flagging and banding efforts, very little is known about the migratory strategies and the breeding grounds of this species that spends the non-breeding season mainly on the northern shorelines o...
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Seasonal changes in environmental drivers – such as temperature, rainfall, and resource availability – have the potential to shape infection dynamics through their reverberating effects on biological processes including host abundance and susceptibility to infection. However, seasonality varies geographically. We therefore expect marked differences...
Article
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The East Asian–Australian Flyway spans from North Asia to Australia and is the world's richest birds' flyway because it involves >40% of global migratory bird species. However, information is lacking on individual migratory routes and non-breeding grounds for small land birds using this flyway. Here, we present the first migration tracks of the son...
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Consequences conferred at a distance Migratory animals have adapted to life in multiple, sometimes very different environments. Thus, they may show particularly complex responses as climates rapidly change. Van Gils et al. show that body size in red knot birds has been decreasing as their Arctic breeding ground warms (see the Perspective by Wikelsk...
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Reductions in body size are increasingly being identified as a response to climate warming. Here we present evidence for a case of such body shrinkage, potentially due to malnutrition in early life. We show that an avian long-distance migrant (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), which is experiencing globally unrivaled warming rates at its high-Ar...
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Marine ecosystems face a variety of threats induced by environmental changes and anthropogenic activities. Seabirds are predators often used as indicator species to monitor the status and health of their communities and the environment. Here, we present the results from a 35-year monitoring time series of Brown Skuas (Catharacta antarctica lonnberg...
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Most migratory shorebird populations around the world are in jeopardy, none more so than those of the East Asian Australasian Flyway (EAAF). In order to preserve these highly mobile species detailed understanding of their use of fuelling and resting sites along the flyway is required. In this study we used light-level geolocators and new analytical...
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In migratory animals, protandry (earlier arrival of males on the breeding grounds) prevails over protogyny (females preceding males). In theory, sex differences in timing of arrival should be driven by the operational sex ratio, shifting toward protogyny in female-biased populations. However, empirical support for this hypothesis is, to date, lacki...
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Migratory connectivity can have important consequences for individuals, populations and communities. We argue that most consequences not only depend on which sites are used but importantly also on when these are used and suggest that the timing of migration is characterised by synchrony, phenology, and consistency. We illustrate the importance of t...
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Background Avian influenza viruses (AIVs) are found worldwide in numerous bird species, causing significant disease in gallina- ceous poultry and occasionally other species. Surveillance of wild bird reservoirs provides an opportunity to add to the understand- ing of the epidemiology of AIVs. Methods This study examined key findings from the Nation...
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Migration detours, the spatial deviation from the shortest route, are a widespread phenomenon in migratory species, especially if barriers must be crossed. Moving longer distances causes additional efforts in energy and time, and to be adaptive, this should be counterbalanced by favorable condition en route. We compared migration patterns of nighti...