Silvia Gullino

Silvia Gullino
Birmingham City University | BCU · Birmingham School of the Built Environment

PhD in Spatial Planning MRTPI MArch MSc SFHEA

About

27
Publications
1,205
Reads
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56
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
34 Citations
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Introduction
Silvia is Associate Professor in City Making and Course Leader of the MPlan/BSc Property Development and Planning at Birmingham City University. An Architect and RTPI Chartered Planner, Silvia has more than ten years’ experience in teaching and researching in the UK, US and Italy.
Additional affiliations
August 2017 - September 2020
Birmingham City University
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
January 2017 - July 2017
University of Salford
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2015 - March 2015
UCL
Position
  • Bartlett Visiting Research Fellow
Education
August 2005 - July 2006
Johns Hopkins University
Field of study
  • Urban Policies
March 2002 - July 2005
Politecnico di Milano
Field of study
  • Urban Planning
October 1999 - October 2000
Politecnico di Torino
Field of study
  • Environmental Engineering

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Aim: Studies have explored how mothers and premature babies make the transition from a neonatal unit (NNU) to home, but little is known about how mothers cope with urban life with a vulnerable baby. This controlled trial investigated how first-time mothers with singleton preterm babies handled that experience in the first few months after discharg...
Article
This article explores the potential of a GIS-based approach to city management - Baltimore's CitiStat e-government program - for meeting the goals of sustainable urban regeneration. The argument advocated here builds on the widely held recognition that the application of ICTs in general can lead to both new forms of inclusion and exclusion of citiz...
Article
Full-text available
Current British urban policy reflects the importance of the concept of mixed communities as a means of achieving sustainable communities. This paper will argue that the relationship expressed in UK policies between 'mixed' and 'sustainable' communities tends to refer to the final stage of the (re)development process of a community (the product), wi...
Article
Drawing on Amin and Thrift’s (2002) sense of cities as spaces of movement, flow and everyday practices, in this paper I suggest a broadening of investigation of social sustainability from spaces of community to urban spaces of movement by looking at everyday, ordinary spaces like train stations. I will argue that these places, defined by the routin...
Article
Addressing the under-researched interplay between civic activism and government agencies, this paper focuses on the conditions for broad local support for civic crowdfunding projects and the interaction between proponents of such projects, their associated stakeholders, and traditional urban planning frameworks. Building on Carolina Pacchi’s the wo...
Article
England (and more specifically London) is experiencing a severe housing crisis framed by rising property prices, lack of affordability, reduced rates of homeownership and rising levels of housing inequality (Gallent et al, 2018). This paper focuses on the lack of affordable housing and, more specifically, on how social housing supply is disappearin...
Chapter
The making of future cities involves the challenging of existing models of urban development while promoting alternative processes, practices, and digital technologies to make urban areas more socially sustainable and liveable, and more environmentally resilient. But who takes part in defining and designing the cities of the future? What roles do c...
Article
This article explores the potential of a GIS-based approach to city management – Baltimore’s CitiStat e-government program – for meeting the goals of sustainable urban regeneration. The argument advocated here builds on the widely held recognition that the application of ICTs in general can lead to both new forms of inclusion and exclusion of citiz...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The recent Covid-19 lockdown has forced lecturers to rapidly shift their teaching and modules/courses content online. While the complexity and the effectiveness of such transition is still the object of discussion and reflection, the online switch has also offered interesting opportunities to rethink how to reconfigure blended learning (online/offline, synchronous/asynchronous, and active/passive methods) in order to ensure effective and creative students’ experience and discuss new practices across different academic communities. In light of developing online learning as result of possible lockdowns and/or restricted access to the University campus, it is important to rethink how to enhance online students’ learning experience, how lecturers can enthuse students through a range of learning activities and how to use technology to facilitate an interactive dialogue between students and lecturers (Campbell, 2005; Salmon, 2008). This research proposal draws upon the experience of a final year module taught pre-Covid lockdown within the BSc Property Development and Planning (PDP) course, in which podcasting was used as both a teaching and learning method and as a form of interactive assessment (student-generated podcasts). Not having experienced the inclusion of podcasting in their academic learning before, its use enthused and inspired students and the module resulted in 100% students’ satisfaction. By involving such cohort of Property Development and Planning final year students acting as co-creators of knowledge, this research proposal aims at (1) critically exploring their podcasting experience within their teaching and learning, and the benefits of generating podcasts; (2) exploring their educational potential and encouraging a more systematic use of podcasting in the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Built Environment (teaching, learning and assessment).
Project
The recent Covid-19 lockdown has forced lecturers to rapidly shift their teaching and modules/courses content online. While the complexity and the effectiveness of such transition is still the object of discussion and reflection, the online switch has also offered interesting opportunities to rethink how to reconfigure blended learning (online/offline, synchronous/asynchronous, and active/passive methods) in order to ensure effective and creative students’ experience and discuss new practices across different academic communities. In light of developing online learning as result of possible lockdowns and/or restricted access to the University campus, it is important to rethink how to enhance online students’ learning experience, how lecturers can enthuse students through a range of learning activities and how to use technology to facilitate an interactive dialogue between students and lecturers. This research proposal draws upon the experience of a final year module taught pre-Covid lockdown, in which podcasting was used as both a teaching and learning method and as a form of interactive assessment (student-generated podcasts). Not having experienced the inclusion of podcasting in their academic learning before, its use enthused and inspired students and the module resulted in 100% students’ satisfaction. This research proposal aims at (1) critically exploring their podcasting experience within the module and the benefits of generating podcasts; (2) exploring their educational potential and encouraging a more systematic use of podcasting in hgiher education (teaching, learning and assessment).
Project
This project investigates who are the Student Parents enrolled in Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Built Environment (CEBE) courses at both UG and PG level at BCU, what aspiration and motivation they have to study at University while having dependent children, what barriers they face and what pressures they undergo, and how can they be effectively supported in their teaching and learning. Student Parents (SPs) tend to be an overlooked and diverse group (e.g. not only mature students) in academic debates about inclusivity in Higher Education. Nevertheless, because of their competing and demanding caring responsibilities, Student Parents can be affected by a number of disparities over ‘traditional students’ (e.g. social inclusivity, attendance, group coursework) that can be subsequently reflected in their attainment and retention. The project entails the use of qualitative methods and the collaboration of a team of under and postgraduate students as research partners.