Silvia Camporesi

Silvia Camporesi
King's College London | KCL · Department of Global Health & Social Medicine

PhD, PhD
Bioethicist and sports ethicist working at the intersection of innovative biotechnology, ethics and society.

About

100
Publications
23,322
Reads
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1,600
Citations
Citations since 2017
42 Research Items
864 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023050100150
Introduction
I am a bioethicist with an interdisciplinary training in biotechnology and philosophy of medicine. I write on the ethics of emerging biotechnologies and ethics and law in medicine and sport. I am based at King's College London where I am Director of the MSc in Bioethics & Society. For info about my research: https://silviacamporesiresearch.org/ For info about the Bioethics & Society MSc: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/bioethics-and-society-ma-pg-dip-pg-cert.aspx
Additional affiliations
July 2018 - present
King's College London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Tenured, permanent position.
October 2013 - July 2018
King's College London
Position
  • Lecturer
June 2011 - October 2013
King's College London
Position
  • Blog administrator
Description
  • http://humanitiesandhealth.wordpress.com/
Education
October 2010 - October 2013
King's College, London
Field of study
  • Philosophy of Medicine
January 2006 - October 2010
European School of Molecular Medicine
Field of study
  • Life Sciences: Foundations & Ethics
September 2004 - December 2006
University of Bologna
Field of study
  • Medical Biotechnology

Publications

Publications (100)
Presentation
Full-text available
Our work about how expert advice has been sought, produced and utilized in the Covid-19 health emergency in Italy in 2020, presented at the 19th biennal conference of the European Society of Health and Medical Sociology
Article
Full-text available
This qualitative case study is part of the international research project ESCaPE (Evaluating Scientific Advice in a Pandemic Emergency) and aims at understanding how expert advice has been sought, produced and utilized in the management of the Covid-19 emergency in Italy in 2020. Italy was the first country after China having to face the devastatin...
Article
Full-text available
On September 8th, 2020, the Swiss Federal Supreme Sport dismissed the double appeal by Caster Semenya against the decision of the Court for Arbitration of Sport to uphold the World Athletics regulations restricting testosterone levels in female runners. On February 24th, 2021, Semenya appealed to the European Court of Human Rights. This is the most...
Article
Full-text available
While the world was facing a rapidly progressing COVID-19 second wave, a policy paradox emerged. On the one side, much more was known by Autumn 2020 about the mechanisms underpinning the spread and lethality of Sars-CoV-2. On the other side, how such knowledge should be translated by policymakers into containment measures appeared to be much more c...
Article
This paper aims to bring a novel approach to the discussion of unfair advantages in sport by looking for a local criterion of fairness instead of a universal criterion. A local criterion of fairness would not solve the general dispute over what counts as an unfair advantage, but it would be beneficial in evaluating specific cases and could guide fu...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I discuss the ethical justifiability of the limitation of freedom of movement, in particular of the ban on running outdoors, enforced in Italy as a response to the COVID-19 outbreak in the spring of 2020. I argue that through the lens of public health ethics literature, the ban on running falls short of the criterion of proportionalit...
Article
Sport regulators are conservative. In the Semenya v IAAF dispute in 2019, CAS accepted IAAF’s rationale that the binary classification in athletics exists to protect women’s sports. Their arbitral decision[ii] to dismiss the appeal by Semenya was ‘constrained by the accepted, necessary, binary division of athletics into male and female events’.10 T...
Article
We report here an emerging dispute in Italy concerning triage criteria for critically ill covid-19 patients, and how best to support doctors having to make difficult decisions in a context of insufficient life saving resources. The dispute we present is particularly significant as it juxtaposes two opposite views of who should make triage decisions...
Article
Full-text available
After the lockdown, as measures start to be eased up around the world, who will we trust to see without a mask? Who will we trust with a kiss and hug? Who will we trust to have intimate relationships with? In this piece (1,650 words) published for Institute of Art and Ideas online magazine, I discuss trust and vulnerability and the human condition...
Article
Our obsession with “natural” products and practices is a proxy for other values
Article
The authority of bioethics as a field of inquiry and of bioethicists as scholars with a distinctive expertise is being questioned on various fronts. Sarah Franklin’s 2019 Nature commentary ‘Ethical research – the long and bumpy road from shirked to shared’ is the latest example . In this paper, we respond to these challenges by focusing on two key...
Article
There is a fundamental tension in many sports: human sex is not binary, but there are only two categories in which people can compete: male and female. Over the past 10 years, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) regulations have been at the centre of two notable legal disputes. The Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) reac...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses the possible biofuture in which we are able to grow humanised organs in pigs for the purposes of human transplantation, which has brought xenotransplantation closer to the present thanks to experiments conducted by George Church at MIT, which use CRISPR genome editing technologies to edit out a number of retroviruses that are e...
Book
Advances in genetics and related biotechnologies are having a profound effect on sport, raising important ethical questions about the limits and possibilities of the human body. Drawing on real case studies and grounded in rigorous scientific evidence, this book offers an ethical critique of current practices and explores the intersection of geneti...
Article
Full-text available
This document is designed to give guidance on assessing researchers in bioethics/medical ethics. It is intended to assist members of selection, confirmation and promotion committees, who are required to assess those conducting bioethics research when they are not from a similar disciplinary background. It does not attempt to give guidance on the qu...
Book
Advances in genetics and related biotechnologies are having a profound effect on sport, raising important ethical questions about the limits and possibilities of the human body. Drawing on real case studies and grounded in rigorous scientific evidence, this book offers an ethical critique of current practice and explores the intersection of genetic...
Article
Full-text available
This Bioethics and Biopolitics: Presents and Futures of Reproduction symposium draws together a series of articles that were each submitted independently by their authors to the JBI and which explore the biopower axis in the externalization of reproduction in four contexts: artificial gestation (ectogenesis), PGD for sex selection, women’s (reprodu...
Article
The persistence of doping in professional sports—either by individuals on an isolated basis and by whole teams as part of a systematic doping programme—means that professional sport today is rarely if ever untainted. There are financial incentives in place that incentivise doping and there are data that show that doping is often a systematic, organ...
Article
Full-text available
“Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement” examines the social, cultural, and ethical ramifications of changing public trust in the expert biomedical knowledge systems of emergent and complex global societies. This symposium was conceived as an interdisciplinary project, drawing on bioethics, the social sciences, and the...
Chapter
The focus of this chapter is on the philosophy of Sports Medicine, that is, the practice of medicine in the context of sport. The chapter begins by examining ways in which a distinction in kind can be claimed between Sports Medicine and medicine per se. It does this by focussing first on the goals of medicine. This strategy proves to be indecisive,...
Article
Full-text available
This paper provides an overview of the ethical issues in the international clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) genome editing debate from March 2015 to September 2016. We present the regulatory framework for embryo research in the UK, and explain why CRISPR is not a significant break with the past. We discuss the ethi...
Article
This paper is the result of a collaborative work between researchers based in UK, Italy, China and Brazil, and aims at providing a comprehensive review of practices and meanings of Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) in these countries, while also highlighting the ethical implications that NIPT poses. In the first part of this paper we describe ho...
Article
http://theconversation.com/why-caster-semenya-and-dutee-chand-deserve-to-compete-and-win-at-rio-2016-63727
Article
Full-text available
The increasing tendency to run clinical trials offshore in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has been extensively documented. In parallel, in high-income countries (HICs) as the US, we are witnessing the emergence of new forms of clinical research where un(der)insured fractions of the population are trading access for participation to health...
Article
The Biological Foundations of Bioethics By Tim Lewens Oxford University Press, 2015, 240 pp, £ 30.00 ISBN: 9780198712657 - Volume 91 Issue 4 - Silvia Camporesi
Book
Full-text available
https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138852914 "After the young South African athlete Caster Semenya won the 800m title at the 2009 World Championships she was obliged to undergo gender testing and was temporarily withdrawn from international competition. The way that this controversy unfolded represents a rich and multi-layered example of the c...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we discuss the ethics of genetics-based talent identification programmes in sports. We discuss the validity and reliability of the tests and the claims made by direct to consumer companies, before presenting a range of ethical issues concerning child-parent/guardian relations raised by these tests, which we frame in terms of parental...
Chapter
The focus of this chapter is on the philosophy of Sports Medicine, that is, the practice of medicine in the context of sport. The chapter begins by examining ways in which a distinction in kind can be claimed between Sports Medicine and medicine per se. It does this by focussing first on the goals of medicine. This strategy proves to be indecisive,...
Article
Full-text available
The general consensus among sport and exercise genetics researchers is that genetic tests have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance. Despite the lack of evidence, recent years have witnessed the rise of an emerging market of direct-to-consumer marketing (DTC) tests that clai...
Article
The International Association for Athletics Federations (IAAF) has been granted 2 years to submit further evidence showing a correlation between higher levels of testosterone and a competitive advantage. This article first presents the case of Caster Semenya, which triggered the drafting by IAAF of the regulations on eligibility of female athletes...
Article
If bioethics is the answer, what was the question? Posed by British philosopher Richard Ashcroft (2004), this question influenced Duncan Wilson when writing The Making of British Bioethics, published by Manchester University Press in 2014 in open access form, thanks to support from the Wellcome Trust. Duncan Wilson is a historian of medicine based...
Article
Scientists have been calling for a "voluntary moratorium" to pause and reflect on the technique of germ-line gene editing "until more research is done." References to the 1975 Asilomar (CA) conference as an exemplar of good and responsible scientific practice are ubiquitous. (For example, see the recent blog post by Stanford legal scholar and bioet...
Article
This is an excerpt from the content The Ethics of the New Eugenics, edited by Calum MacKellar and Christopher Bechtel (2014), An introductory “Note on the Text” states: “The research on which this book is based was commissioned by the Scottish Council on Human Bioethics. It is the result of the collective work of many individuals at the Scottish Co...
Chapter
Elite sport has long been the laboratory for the introduction of biomedical technologies aimed at health optimization and performance enhancement (Hoberman 1992). In parallel, the body of the elite athlete has been the locus of experimentation of these technologies. Now, more than ever, with the advancement of biomedical technologies, elite spor...
Article
Full-text available
In light of the World Anti Doping Agency's 2013 Code Revision process, we critically explore the applicability of two of three criteria used to determine whether a method or substance should be considered for their Prohibited List, namely its (potential) performance enhancing effects and its (potential) risk to the health of the athlete. To do so,...
Article
In this paper, we analyse the role of incentives in high-performance sports, borrowing concepts from sustainability policies and applying them to the context of doping in sports. Professional athletes discount their future health in exchange for desired enhanced performances. In the same way, many industrialised societies discount future environmen...
Chapter
The last 15 years have witnessed a boom of genetic tests for sport performance. They relate to both the ability to predict athletes at higher risks for specific injuries, and to the ability to predict athletic talent. They raise scientific and ethical issues related to confidentiality, conflict of interest of the sports physician, informed consent...
Article
Full-text available
The recent boom of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests, aimed at measuring children’s athletic potential, is the latest wave in the ‘pre-professionalization’ of children that has characterized, especially but not exclusively, the USA in the last 15 years or so. In this paper, I analyse the use of DTC genetic tests, sometimes coupled with more tr...
Article
Full-text available
In May 2011, more than a decade after the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) abandoned sex testing, they devised new policies in response to the IAAF's treatment of Caster Semenya, the South African runner whose sex was challenged because of her spectacular win and powerful physiq...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we consider two plausible scenarios in which an individual is seeking treatment with gene transfer tools to cope better with pain. In the first scenario the individual is a patient; in the second an athlete. The general question explored is whether it is ethically justifiable for the individual to seek an experimental gene transfer tr...
Article
Full-text available
San Francisco served as the host city for the 5th Annual Health 2.0 conference on 25-27 September 2011, which gathered more than 1,500 people interested and actively involved in innovation in health care through information technology. The author attended this conference and in this paper is presenting key insights, concepts, and news from the cutt...
Article
A pan-European survey was conducted under the auspices of the FP7 Eurocancercoms project during the period September 2010-March 2011. It was designed to broaden public policy understanding of patients' specific needs when seeking online cancer information and aimed to identify gaps in the online cancer information provision across Europe. In this p...
Article
Full-text available
The assessment of chronic pain is a highly unmet medical need. Chronic pain is also the subject of a large and costly category of legal claims. Yet, with pain cases, the jury always face a doubt: is the claimant faking or malingering? How can we be assured that the claimant is 'really' in pain? Most recently, several new neuroimaging technologies a...
Article
The burden of cancer is growing, and the disease is becoming a major economic expenditure for all developed countries. In 2008, the worldwide cost of cancer due to premature death and disability (not including direct medical costs) was estimated to be US$895 billion. This is not simply due to an increase in absolute numbers, but also the rate of in...
Article
A tutt'oggi non esiste una tradizione disciplinare che vada sotto il nome di "filosofia della medicina molecolare". Il presente lavoro tratteggia le basi per un ampio e sistematico progetto sui fondamenti di questa disciplina, individuando le possibili aree di analisi e le eventuali strategie di approccio: informazione genetica e patologia, organis...
Article
We test the approach outlined by Häyry in his book Rationality and the Genetic Challenge: Making People Better? by applying it to an eighth genetic challenge, namely, a variation of the genetic enhancement challenge discussed by Häyry as it applies to sports. We assess whether genetic enhancement in sports should be conceived as an eighth wonder or...
Article
Full-text available
Overcoming childhood cancers is critically dependent on the state of research. Understanding how, with whom and what the research community is doing with childhood cancers is essential for ensuring the evidence-based policies at national and European level to support children, their families and researchers. As part of the European Union funded EUR...
Article
Full-text available
Caster Semenya, a South African 18-year-old, won the 800-metre track running title at the Berlin World Athletics Championships in 2009. Only 3 h later, her gender was being harshly contested. The investigation of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) was neither discreet nor respectful of her privacy. Caster's case has impli...
Article
Full-text available
These words were written by ethicist Jonathan Glover in his paper “Future People, Disability and Screening” in 1992. Whereas screening and choosing for a disability remained a theoretical possibility 16 years ago, it has now become reality. In 2006, Susannah Baruch and colleagues at John Hopkins University published a survey of 190 American preimpl...
Article
The aim of my PhD project is the analysis of the ethical and regulatory issues of Phase 0 oncological trials. In 2003, the European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) published a concept note followed by a Position Paper on the nonclinical safety studies needed to support human clinical trials with a single microdose of a pharma...
Article
Full-text available
Mounting evidence indicates that the function of members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family extends beyond blood vessel formation. Here, we show that the prolonged intramyocardial expression of VEGF-A(165) and VEGF-B(167) on adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery determined a marked improvement in cardiac function after...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we address the ethical challenges of research on cytoplasmic hybrid embryos, or "cybrids". The controversial pronouncement of the UK's Human Embryology and Fertilisation Authority of September 2007 on the permissibility of this area of research is the starting point of our discussion, and we argue in its favour. By a rigorous definiti...
Article
Full-text available
After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of...
Article
Research on human stem cells and embryos creates ethical issues. Here I discuss ten frequently used arguments against research and point out their weaknesses. These arguments include the possessed potentiality of the embryo per se and, in contrast to other cell systems, the "slippery slope" argument, the right of disposal of parents, totipotency ve...

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Projects

Projects (6)
Project
Comparative and international evaluation of the mechanisms of science advice in the pandemic emergency
Project
Scientific knowledge and expertise is increasingly important in support of effective decision making.. The Coronavirus pandemic has put institutional mechanisms to offer expert advice to the test. This project performs a comparative, international evaluation of mechanisms of science advice in the pandemic emergency. As the pandemic continues, the results of this research will be of potential immediate relevance to institutions that are addressing the continuing need for science advice. https://escapecovid19.org/project_teams/
Project
This project will examine how new biological entities, specifically the making of synthetic human entities with embryo-like features (SHEEFs), present new challenges to assessing and understanding new life forms in the 21st century. By comparing and contrasting the bioethical approaches to ‘synthetic embryos’ in the UK and Germany, this project will establish a knowledge base to examine how democratic control over these new entities touches “the political and cultural nerve centres of industrial nations” .