Silvia Amicone

Silvia Amicone
University of Tuebingen | EKU Tübingen · Applied Mineralogy, CCA-BW

Doctor of Philosophy

About

48
Publications
6,770
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Introduction
I am a research scientist within the Archaeometry group of the University of Tübingen and an active member of the Ceramic Technology Research Network at the Institute of Archaeology (University College London). Material culture and archaeometry are my primary fields of research. My teaching covers different aspects of archaeological science and theory and I am leading courses on material science and archaeological ceramics.

Publications

Publications (48)
Article
Full-text available
This study applies thin-section petrography to a wide selection of ceramic and geological samples from four archaeological sites (Belovode, Pločnik, Gradište-Iđjoš, and Potporanj) belonging to both the Neolithic and Chalcolithic phases of the Vinča culture phenomenon (c. 5350 to 4600 BCE) to track intra- and interregional traditions of pottery prod...
Article
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The present paper re-examines the purported relationship between Late Neolithic/Early Chalcolithic pottery firing technology and the world's earliest recorded copper metallurgy at two Serbian Vinča culture sites, Belovode and Pločnik (c. 5350 to 4600 BC). A total of eighty-eight well-dated sherds including dark-burnished and graphite-painted potter...
Article
Full-text available
The island of Tavolara off the coast of northeastern Sardinia (Italy) was intermittently occupied from Neolithic to modern times, and recent excavations at the site of Spalmatore di Terra have revealed the presence of Villanovan ceramics on the island dating to the 9th century BCE (according to the traditional chronology). Contacts between Etruria...
Article
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Addressing ceramic pyrotechnology plays a key role in understanding a wide range of cultural and social behaviours associated to pottery production. Firing is the process which transforms clay into ceramic, which is one of the most frequently preserved materials in the majority of Neolithic and later archaeological sites. Though firing temperatures...
Article
Although the chaîne opératoire approach was introduced more than half a century ago, it has seldom been employed to reconstruct the techniques and tools involved in the production of Iron Age pottery (c. 1200–600 BC) from Iraqi Kurdistan. One of the reasons why this method is so seldomly applied is that only rarely can archaeologists rely on enough...
Article
Full-text available
The Carpathian Basin was a highly influential centre of metalworking in the 2nd mil. BC. Nevertheless, despite the abundance of metal objects from the Late Bronze Age, the scarcity of contextually associated metalworking remains representing distinct phases of the metalworking cycle from this region is striking. Here, we explore Late Bronze Age met...
Chapter
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This chapter summarises the macroscopic and microscopic analyses of pottery sherds from the sites of Belovode and Pločnik, presented in Chapters 14 and 31, and provides insight into different technological traits in order to aid reconstruction of pottery making recipes in these two Vinča culture communities. Using a multi- pronged scientific approa...
Article
Full-text available
This work investigates the technology of pottery production at the Chalcolithic site of Radovanu-La Muscalu (first half of the fifth millennium BCE), in southern Romania. The excavation of this settlement yielded a rich and well-contextualised archaeological assemblage that represents the last phases of development of Boian material culture, a Chal...
Chapter
'The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia' is a landmark study in the origins of metallurgy. The project aimed to trace the invention and innovation of metallurgy in the Balkans. It combined targeted excavations and surveys with extensive scientific analyses at two Neolithic-Chalcolithic copper production and consumption sites, Belovode and Pločnik, in Se...
Chapter
'The Rise of Metallurgy in Eurasia' is a landmark study in the origins of metallurgy. The project aimed to trace the invention and innovation of metallurgy in the Balkans. It combined targeted excavations and surveys with extensive scientific analyses at two Neolithic-Chalcolithic copper production and consumption sites, Belovode and Pločnik, in Se...
Chapter
Full-text available
A well-preserved arrowhead of the Bodkin type was investigated by micro-X-ray computed tomography, and shown to be made from bloomery iron forged into shape. Some really nice images were obtained and are presented here. As discussed in more detail in the main chapter on Iron arrowheads from the Dinka Settlement Complex, 2015-2019, by A Hellmuth Kra...
Article
Full-text available
Despite the importance of wine in the Iron Age Mediterranean, known structures associated with its production are rare. Recent excavations at Phoenician Tell el-Burak have now revealed the first Iron Age wine press in Lebanon. Its remarkable state of preservation enables a systematic study of its plaster to be made as well as a comparison with two...
Article
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The study analyses through an interdisciplinary approach the wattle‐and‐daub building technique used on the Po Plain of northern Italy, focusing on the archaeological evidence from the Etruscan site of Forcello, near Bagnolo San Vito (Mantua) (540–375 bce). Wattle and daub is widespread across different times and periods, and is particularly common...
Article
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This paper contextualizes analyses of a collection of metal artifacts and ostensible metallurgical slag from the prehistoric settlement of Su Coddu in south-central Sardinia (ca. 3400–2850 BCE). To characterize the types of metals and associated alloys utilized by the earliest residents of Su Coddu, two pins and an unshaped lump of unknown composit...
Chapter
This paper presents first results of the Tuebingen Mortar Project on the research of ancient mortar and plaster and related building materials. In a case study, archaeometric data from lime mortars, sampled in the Casa di Arpocrate in the Hellenistic-Roman city of Solunto, are discussed concerning their mineralogical composition and their chronolog...
Book
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n the present-day world order, political disintegration, the faltering of economic systems, the controversial and yet dramatic consequences of global warming and pollution, and the spread of poverty and social disruption in Western countries have rendered ‘collapse’ one of the hottest topics in the humanities and social sciences. In the frenetic ru...
Chapter
The expansion of the so-called Tisza culture from the core areas of its development in the middle portion of the Tisza River in Serbia begins in the period of the fully formed Vinča settlements (5200-5000 cal. BC) in the northern Banat. Individual finds of Tisza pottery style at some Vinča sites could be evidence of pottery circulation in the south...
Book
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Tracing Pottery-Making Recipes in the Prehistoric Balkans 6th-4 th Millennia BC is a collection of twelve chapters that capture the variety of current archaeological, ethnographic, experimental and scientific studies on Balkan prehistoric ceramic production, distribution and use. The Balkans is a culturally rich area at the present day as it was in...
Chapter
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We present the scientific analyses conducted on the ongoing excavation of the late Criș settlement at Tăşnad-‘Sere’, Satu Mare county. The excavation aims to understand the relationship between the occupation layer and sub-surface features. We seek to achieve constant feedback between the scientific analysis and the excavation, adapting our excavat...
Chapter
The discovery of remains of daub, especially burned, is very common in Italian pre- and protohistoric sites. This collective work aims to summarize the researches carried out over the last thirty years in Italian contexts of the Late Prehistory, from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. The subjects considered in this paper will be the selection of raw m...
Thesis
This PhD research focuses on the reconstruction of pottery recipes and their transmission in the Neolithic/Chalcolithic sites of Belovode and Pločnik (c. 5200–4650 BC). These two Vinča culture sites, located respectively in North-East and South Serbia, have recently yielded some of the earliest known copper artefacts in Eurasia. The rich material c...
Article
Full-text available
Accordia is an independent research institute that operates in association with the UCL Institute of Archaeology and with the Institute of Classical Studies, the School of Advanced Study, and the University of London. It is dedicated to the promotion and co-ordination of research in all aspects of Italy, from the earliest settlements to the recent...
Chapter
Full-text available
The study of fourth-century BC black gloss from Iasos offers interesting insights into the appearance of Atticising pottery at this site alongside vessels imported from Attica. In order to evaluate the potential for undertaking a technological approach to answer the complex question of Attic black gloss importation and imitation in Iasos during the...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
https://www.en.ag.geschichte.uni-muenchen.de/research/peshdar-plain-project/index.html
Project
One of the most evident aspects within the far-reaching contacts that characterised the Central Mediterranean in the 3rd mill. BCE is the expansion of the Cetina phenomenon, which represented a common denominator for areas from Dalmatia to the Caput Adriae in the north to Sicily and the Maltese Islands, and the Peloponnese in the south.The diffusion of Cetina pottery is connected to the spread of types of funerary structures and practices, and of other elements of material culture which can be connected to the prestige sphere. However, lacking a comprehensive trans-regional study of the material culture no reliable explanation or thorough interpretation for the Cetina phenomenon has been attempted so far. Combining archaeometric analyses to a trans-regional study of Cetina contexts, mobility, connectivity, economy and cultural-social issues will be understood and explained.