Silja Klepp

Silja Klepp
Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel | CAU · Department of Geography

Professor of Human Geography
Working on radical soicio-ecological transformation based on social and environmental justice"

About

30
Publications
16,476
Reads
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470
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
386 Citations
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Introduction
Silja Klepp is a professor of human geography at Kiel University, Germany. Our research group deals with human-environment relations in the Anthropocene. We use political ecology, critical social theory and postcolonial approaches to investigate topics such as the consequences of climate change (politics), resource conflicts, adpatation interventions and emancipatory strategies for environmental and climate migrants. We have co-founded the environmental justice network EnJust (www.enjust.net).

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Change triggered by natural hazards such as pluvial and coastal floods, sea-level rise as well as risks resulting from water scarcity are highly dynamic and related to the effects of ongoing climate change. Whether and how societies adapt, adjust, change, or transform because of climate change and related risks, is a currently debated topic. This q...
Research Proposal
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Research brief on salient issues and approaches concerning the nexus between climate change and migration.
Article
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Reducing vulnerabilities is at the core of climate change adaptation interventions. This goal is usually approached from the perspective of increasingly universal adaptation methodologies, tools and services that are grounded in Western scientific thought and knowledge. Questions of (in-)justices and new or reproduced vulnerabilities play a margina...
Article
Full-text available
This special issue (SI) shows that environmental justice perspectives are especially useful for analysing current socio-ecological conflicts. These perspectives help to bridge epistemological and ontological gaps in inter- and transdisciplinary settings and promote normative and justice-oriented discussions on environmental struggles within and bey...
Article
Due to anthropogenic climate change and the ongoing integration of agriculture into the world market economy, access to arable and habitable land has become an urgent issue within current transnational debates on environmental (in)justice. In particular, the emerging calls for 'food sovereignty' (FS) and 'migrate with dignity' (MWD) show how most v...
Article
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In this intervention, we reflect on the potential of environmental justice and climate justice approaches to reveal the politics of climate change adaptation. Taking the attempts at dealing with extreme flooding events in Venice as an example, we illustrate that different dimensions at the core of the environmental justice concept (distributive and...
Article
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This special issue explores underrepresented aspects of the political dimensions of global warming. It includes post- and decolonial perspectives on climate-related migration and conflict, intersectional approaches, and climate change politics as a new tool of governance. Its aim is to shed light on the social phenomena associated with anthropogeni...
Article
Full-text available
Long-term adaptation planning for sustainable coast, Editorial Speical Issue
Chapter
So-called “climate migration” has been presented as a phenomenon causing a multitude of crises on different levels, in the worst case leading to political instability and violence. Oceania is considered a prime example for this assumed linear causality, since sea level rise is threatening to displace large numbers of people. The chapter outlines ho...
Article
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Climate-induced migration" is often perceived as potentially leading to political instability and violence, and thus, as critical. Oceania is considered a prime example for this assumed linear causality, since sea level rise and other effects of anthropogenic climate change are threatening to displace large numbers of people in the region. The poli...
Article
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Kiribati is among the many islands in Oceania that are highly affected by anthropogenic climate change and has, as such, adopted a proactive role to deal with adaptation. The article analyses how the government brings together climate change discourses with its struggle for new rights and resources for the country. The awareness of anthropogenic cl...
Book
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This edited volume brings together critical research on climate change adaptation discourses, policies, and practices from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Drawing on examples from countries including Colombia, Mexico, Canada, Germany, Russia, Tanzania, Indonesia, and the Pacific Islands, the chapters describe how adaptation measures are interpret...
Chapter
Full-text available
1 Governing climate changeThe power of adaptation discourses, policies, and practices1Silja Klepp and Libertad Chavez- RodriguezIntroductionClimate change adaptation is an influential discourse and a powerful polit-ical concept linked to many material practices. It has the power2 to set political agendas and policies and to reframe development prog...
Article
Climate change is increasingly challenging the ability of millions of people to sustain livelihoods as the places where they live become uninhabitable. The relocation of populations as individuals, households, and communities within countries and across international borders demonstrates the complexity of climate change impacts. Looking at the lite...
Article
Full-text available
Starting from a critical discussion of current arguments and concepts in research on the environment–migration nexus, the article analyses how environmental migration is discussed in the Pacific region. In the first section we provide a short overview of the academic debates on environmental migration and describe their limitations. We suggest that...
Article
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Zusammenfassung Der Artikel thematisiert die strukturellen Probleme, die zu teilweise unhaltbaren Zuständen in den italienischen Haftzentren für Migrant_innen führen. Auch auf Grund hoher Anlandungszahlen seit 2013 gibt es eine Überlastung des italienischen Aufnahmesystems. Die unsichere und fragmentierte Gesetzeslage und ökonomische Interessen von...
Chapter
Full-text available
In recent decades, the margins of Europe’s Mediterranean region have gone through enormous changes: national borders previously taken for granted have become contested external borders of the European Union (EU). Effects of the relocation of borders and of the European refugee protection system have been especially strong around the Mediterranean S...
Chapter
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Immer wieder wird betont, dass in den globalen Verhandlungen zur Eindämmung des Klimawandels Aspekte der Klimagerechtigkeit (climate justice) eine größere Rolle spielen müssten, um den Stillstand in den Einigungsgesprächen zu überwinden (Parks/ Roberts 2010). Dies gilt sowohl in Bezug auf die internationalen Klimaverhandlungen im Rahmen der UNFCCC...
Article
The paper presents the results of ethnographic fieldwork carried out in the Mediterranean border region in 2006 and 2007, in Libya, Malta and Southern Italy. Combining the empirical study of border regions with a legal anthropological perspective, new parameters for refugee protection, developing at the European Union's external borders, are shown...
Book
Die Außengrenzen sind zu einem umkämpften Raum der EU-Politik zwischen Grenzkontrollen und Flüchtlingsrechten geworden. Silja Klepp stellt diese Aushandlungskämpfe in einer Ethnographie der Seegrenze dar. Forschungsreisen entlang der Küsten von Libyen, Italien und Malta verbinden sich zu einem einzigartig dichten Blick auf die Zwänge und Handlungsl...
Article
Full-text available
This paper discusses research results from anthropologica-fieldwork carried out in Malta in 2007. The island, which is situated in the centra-Mediterranean Sea between Tunisia, Libya and Italy, is a foca-point regarding the continuing refugee situation. One of the research aims was to investigate the situation at sea concerning Search and Rescue (S...
Article
Full-text available
During the past few years the border waters between Europe and Africa have become an EU-policy crucible. In the midst of the tightening of EU border controls and refugee protection claims, supranational, national and local actors find themselves in a phase of legal insecurity and negotiation. This article is based on ethnographical research carried...
Article
Recently Libya has developed from a country of immigration to one of the most important transit countries to Europe. Italy has been mostly affected by the trend of African migrants crossing the Mediterranean by boat starting off in Libya. Therefore, Italy has pushed for negotiating several cooperation agreements in migration issues with the former...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (3)
Project
COLLAB encourages a playful reflection on different backgrounds in interdisciplinary teams in order to improve communication and collaboration. With COLLAB, you can address, discuss, compare, and exchange ideas about disciplinary principles and foundations. This allows you and your research team to create good and effective communication and gain new insights. You can play COLLAB with your colleagues in research settings or at graduate schools. It is especially helpful for new interdisciplinary research teams and when developing a new project idea. We can also facilitate workshops for conferences or help you set up your own COLLAB workshop. https://www.interdisciplinarygames.net/
Project
We are a vibrant network that raises awareness for issues of environmental justice and strengthens the democratic participation of those affected by environmental problems. We connect actors from research, policy and planning, and civil society. We believe that research should address real, pressing challenges and be undertaken in collaborative ways with partners and stakeholders. We create analogue and digital spaces of communication and initiate collaborative research. Mission statement The deteriorating climate and multiple environmental crises affect different demographic groups in diverse ways, creating poor health outcomes and poverty traps for billions. In many places, low-income tenants who live in the neighbourhood of busy roads are exposed to significantly higher emissions than the rest of the local population. All over the world, students and their parents are taking to the streets in order to demand effective measures against climate change, arguing for intergenerational and climate justice. In France, on the other hand, tens of thousands of people are protesting against the introduction of carbon taxes. And at a Regional Court in Germany a Peruvian smallholder is suing the energy group RWE for threatening his livelihood with all the CO2 emitted by the company in Germany. These examples show: environmental and climate crises have arrived in our everyday lives. They raise new questions of distribution and justice that are not easy to answer and that need to be discussed with broad participation of societal actors. This is because the roadmap to more desirable futures for the many (not the few) questions everyone’s ways of life, the predominant models of development, and fundamentally challenge the existing power dynamics controlled by the few. Specifically, the EnJust network wants to encourage innovative research, multi-stakeholder dialogue and effective action on the following questions of environmental and climate justice: Who or what is experiencing new or exacerbated forms of injustice as a result of rapid climate and/or environmental change? Which policies, which social and economic processes – at which scales – can contribute to more just ways of sharing the burden of climate and environmental change? What are innovative ways of communicating both environmental injustice as well as justice-based responses to climate and environmental crises? History of the network The EnJust network was initiated in 2018 at the Geography Department at the Christian-Albrechts-University of Kiel. The founding members, most of whom are academics, include geographers, lawyers, philosophers and political scientists. As a first step, this group organised an international conference on environmental justice, which brought practitioners, artists and scientists from various disciplines to Kiel in June 2019. This conference, at which the website also officially went online, created a first analogue communication space. In the future, we hope for a lively exchange both online and offline. We are very happy about welcoming new members. To learn more, please visit: https://www.enjust.net
Project
Far-reaching social effects of anthropogenic climate change can be currently observed in some countries and regions of the world. These social effects can be conceptualized as second order effects of climate change as they are often not linked to changes of the physical environment; they are rather related to the debates and discourses around climate change and linked to anticipatory strategies and practices that aim at impact mitigation. Especially in the Small Island States of the South Pacific second order effects of climate change influence many processes of public decision-making and international relations. An outstanding example for these developments is the Republic of Kiribati: the island nation is globally perceived as one of the first “victims of climate change” and has been recently developing innovative “climate migration” strategies. The research project aims to examine these innovative strategies, their political and social context and the impacts these policies and practices have on the island state and its citizens. Negotiation processes of rule-setting and law-making “bottom up” and the more general change of values in the context of climate change are the focus. Referring to theoretical concepts of legal anthropology and of legal pluralism, the project participants will develop a legal anthropology of emergence that assesses the second order effects of climate change on the local, national and transnational level and their interconnections. On the one hand, the project seeks to identify transforming attitudes of decision makers and other citizens evolving in the context of climate change in the South Pacific. On the other hand, it seeks to identify changing laws, altering power structures and resource entitlements because of climate change politics in the region. Here, Kiribati is a good research ground as it is taking the lead in developing innovative “climate migration” strategies and policies, asking for solidarity and fair solutions for environmental migrants.