Sietze Norder

Sietze Norder
Leiden University | LEI · Leiden University Centre for Linguistics

MSc

About

29
Publications
20,496
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Introduction
I am a biogeographer with a deep fascination for the relationship between people and nature.
Additional affiliations
June 2011 - February 2015
University of Amsterdam
Position
  • Junior Lecturer

Publications

Publications (29)
Article
Full-text available
Despite islands contributing only 6.7% of land surface area, they harbor ~20% of the Earth’s biodiversity, but unfortunately also ~50% of the threatened species and 75% of the known extinctions since the European expansion around the globe. Due to their geological and geographic history and characteristics, islands act simultaneously as cradles of...
Article
Islands are among the last regions on Earth settled and transformed by human activities, and they provide replicated model systems for analysis of how people affect ecological functions. By analyzing 27 representative fossil pollen sequences encompassing the past 5000 years from islands globally, we quantified the rates of vegetation compositional...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research in island biogeography has highlighted the important role of late Quaternary sea‐level fluctuations in shaping biogeographic patterns in insular systems but focused on oceanic systems. Through this study, we aim investigate how late Quaternary sea‐level fluctuations shaped species richness patterns in continental‐shelf island system...
Article
Full-text available
The reptile fauna of Tinhosa Grande islet, Gulf of Guinea, comprises an endemic skink, Trachylepis adamastor, and an unidentified species of gecko of the genus Hemidactylus. Until recently, no molecular data were available for either species, impeding their phylogenetic placement. However, due to several synapomorphic characters, it was suggested t...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Mountains and islands are both well known for their high endemism. To explain this similarity, parallels have been drawn between the insularity of “true islands” (land surrounded by water) and the isolation of habitats within mountains (so‐called “mountain islands”). However, parallels rarely go much beyond the observation that mountaintops are...
Article
Islands contribute enormously to global biodiversity, but their species and ecosystems are highly threatened and often confined to small patches of remaining native vegetation. Islands are thus ideal microcosms to study the local dimensions of global change. While human activities have drastically transformed most islands, the extent to which socie...
Article
Full-text available
Ongoing work shows that species richness patterns on volcanic oceanic islands are shaped by surface area changes driven by longer time scale (>1 ka) geological processes and natural sea level fluctuations. A key question is: what are the rates and magnitudes of the forces driving spatial changes on volcanic oceanic islands which in turn affect evol...
Article
Aim To quantify the influence of past archipelago configuration on present‐day insular biodiversity patterns, and to compare the role of long‐lasting archipelago configurations over the Pleistocene to configurations of short duration such as at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the present‐day. Location 53 volcanic oceanic islands from 12 archipe...
Article
Full-text available
Past sea level fluctuations have shaped island area and archipelago configuration. The availability of global high-resolution data on bathymetry and past sea levels allows reconstruction of island palaeo-geography. Studies on the role of palaeo-area often consider only the Last Glacial Maximum, which neglects the dynamics of island fusion and fissi...
Article
Full-text available
Fire was rare on Mauritius prior to human arrival (AD 1598); subsequently three phases of elevated fire activity occurred: ca 1630–1747, 1787–1833, and 1950–modern. Elevated fire frequency coincided with periods of high human impact evidenced from the historical record, and is linked to the extinction of island endemics.
Article
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Temporal couplings, such as historical interactions between deforestation and soil loss, are responsible for the current state of a wide range of ecosystem services of the social-ecological system on Mauritius. Islands are suitable study sites for understanding temporal couplings and telecouplings because of their: (1) clearly defined physical boun...
Article
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In this paper, we present the outline of an interdisciplinary undergraduate course entitled: " Islands: Models for our Planet – Metaphors for our World " , and will reflect on insights gained during its development and teaching in two consecutive academic years (2014-2015; 2015-2016). The main challenge faced during the development and teaching of...
Article
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How do organisms arrive on isolated islands, and how do insular evolutionary radiations arise? In a recent paper, Wilmé et al. (2016a) argue that early Austronesians that colonized Madagascar from Southeast Asia translocated giant tortoises to islands in the western Indian Ocean. In the Mascarene Islands, moreover, the human-translocated tortoises...
Article
Full-text available
Although the role that Pleistocene glacial cycles have played in shaping the present biota of oceanic islands world-wide has long been recognized, their geographical, biogeographical and ecological implications have not yet been fully incorporated within existing biogeographical models. Here we summarize the different types of impacts that glacial...
Article
Full-text available
The study of islands as model systems has played an important role in the development of evolutionary and ecological theory. The 50th anniversary of MacArthur and Wilson's (December 1963) article, ‘An equilibrium theory of insular zoogeography’, was a recent milestone for this theme. Since 1963, island systems have provided new insights into the fo...
Data
Aim We assessed the biogeographical implications of Pleistocene sea-level fluctuations on the surface area of Macaronesian volcanic oceanic islands. We quantified the effects of sea-level cycles on surface area over 1000-year intervals. Using data from the Canarian archipelago, we tested whether changes in island configuration since the late Pleis...
Article
Aim: We assess the biogeographic implications of changing surface areas of volcanic oceanic islands by Pleistocene sea level fluctuations. We quantify the effects of sea level cycles over 1000 year intervals on surface areas. We test whether changes in island configuration since the Late Pleistocene explain species distribution patterns using data...
Chapter
Full-text available
The MacArthur and Wilson island biogeography theory relates species diversity on islands as the result of equilibrium between extinctions and colonization events which rates depend on island size and isolation. Although island size and isolation can be considered static on ecological timescales (<100 years) they are not static on longer time scales...

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