Sieb Nooteboom

Sieb Nooteboom
Utrecht University | UU · Utrecht Institute of Linguistics OTS (UiL OTS)

Prof. Dr.

About

90
Publications
20,423
Reads
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2,352
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2004 - present
Utrecht University
Position
  • Guest Researcher
Description
  • Research on the generation of speech errors and self-monitoring for speech errors, in cooperation with Prof. Dr Hugo Quené.
January 1988 - April 2004
Utrecht University
Position
  • Professor of Phonetics
September 1986 - December 1987
Technical University of Eindhoven
Position
  • Part-time professor of experimental linguistics

Publications

Publications (90)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper we attempt to answer the question why in self-monitoring some segmental speech errors are detected in internal, some in external speech, and others not at all. This was done by re-analyzing data obtained in two earlier published SLIP experiments. It is hypothesized that detection of errors that are similar to the correct target takes...
Article
This paper focuses on the source of self-repairs of segmental speech errors during self-monitoring. A potential source of repairs are candidate forms competing with the form under production. In the time interval between self-monitoring internal and overt speech, activation of competitors probably decreases. From this theory of repairing we derived...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The within-word and within-utterance time course of internal and external self-monitoring is investigated in a four-word tongue twister experiment eliciting interactional word initial and word medial segmental errors and their repairs. It is found that detection rate for both internal and external self-monitoring decreases from early to late both w...
Article
Two experiments are reported, eliciting segmental speech errors and self-repairs. Error frequencies, detection frequencies, error-to-cutoff times and cutoff-to-repair times were assessed with and without auditory feedback, for errors against four types of segmental oppositions. Main hypotheses are (a) prearticulatory and postarticulatory detection...
Chapter
Full-text available
Self-repairs of segmental speech errors come in two varieties: repairs of early and of late-detected errors. Early-detected errors are detected in inner, late-detected errors in overt speech. Late-detected errors are those in which the word or phrase containing the error is completed before the repair is made. We made acoustic measurements of both...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates self-monitoring for speech errors by means of consonant identification in speech fragments excised from speech errors and their correct controls, as obtained in earlier experiments eliciting spoonerisms. Upon elicitation, segmental speech errors had been either not detected, or early detected or late detected and repaired by...
Article
Full-text available
In most collections of segmental speech errors, exchanges are less frequent than anticipations and perseverations. However, it has been suggested that in inner speech exchanges might be more frequent than either anticipations or perseverations, because many half-way repaired errors (Yew…uhh..New York) are classified as repaired anticipations, but m...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper it is argued that monitoring for speech errors is not the same in inner speech and in overt speech. In inner speech it is meant to prevent the errors from becoming public, in overt speech to repair the damage caused by the errors. It is expected that in inner speech, but not in overt speech, more nonword errors are detected than real-...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports two experiments designed to investigate whether lexical bias in phonological speech errors is caused by immediate feedback of activation, by self-monitoring of inner speech, or by both. The experiments test a number of predictions derived from a model of self-monitoring of inner speech. This model assumes that, after an error in...
Article
Full-text available
Alaryngeal speakers (speakers in whom the larynx has been removed) have inconsistent control over acoustic parameters such as F(0) and duration. This study investigated whether proficient tracheoesophageal and oesophageal speakers consistently convey phrase boundaries. It was further investigated if these alaryngeal speakers used the same hierarchy...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is concerned with the relation between our capacity for alphabetic reading and writing the sound forms of languages on the one hand, and the structure of speech and language on the other. It starts from two questions: (1) What structural properties of human languages enable us to read and write their sound forms with a handful of alphabe...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates how listeners cope with gradient forms of deletion of word-final /t/ when recognising words in a phonological context that makes /t/-deletion viable. A corpus study confirmed a high incidence of /t/-deletion in an /st#b/ context in Dutch. A discrimination study showed that differences between released /t/, unreleased /t/ and...
Article
Full-text available
This paper confirms and exploits the observation that early overt self-interruptions and repairs of phonological speech errors very likely are reactions to inner speech, not to overt speech. In an experiment eliciting word–word and nonword–nonword phonological spoonerisms it is found that self-interruptions and repairs come in two classes, one clas...
Article
Full-text available
According to Levelt (1989) and Levelt, Roelofs, and Meyer (1999) (a) selfmonitoring of speech production employs the speech comprehension system, (b) on the phonological level the speech comprehension system has no information about the lemmas and forms chosen in production, and (c) lexical bias in speech errors stems from the same perception-based...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I present evidence from both completed and interrupted and both elicited and spontaneous speech errors and their repairs that (1) self-monitoring for speech errors can be directed at inner and at overt speech, and (2) self-monitoring employs different criteria for inner and overt speech. It is suggested that self-monitoring of inner a...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we investigate whether speakers, in line with the predictions of the Hyper- and Hypospeech theory, speed up most during the least informative parts and less during the more informative parts, when they are asked to speak faster. We expected listeners to benefit from these changes in timing, and our main goal was to find out whether ma...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Proceedings of DiSS’03 – Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech. Robert Eklund, editor. ISSN 0349-1021.
Article
Full-text available
Highly proficient alaryngeal speakers are known to convey prosody successfully. The present study investigated whether alaryngeal speakers not selected on grounds of proficiency were able to convey pitch accent (a pitch accent is realized on the word that is in focus, cf. Bolinger, 1958). The participating speakers (10 tracheoesophageal, 9 esophage...
Chapter
Full-text available
1. Why this volume? “The lexicon is really an appendix of the grammar, a list of basic irregularities”. These words, written a long time ago by Leonard Bloomfield (Bloomfield, 1933, p. 274), have set the stage for focusing linguistic and psycholinguistic research on the compositional nature of linguistic objects, a view that has culminated, from th...
Book
Every now and again I receive a lengthy manuscript from a kind of theoretician known to psychiatrists as the "triangle people" - kooks who have independently discovered that everything in the universe comes in threes (solid , liquid, gas; protons, neutrons, electrons; the Father, the Son, the Holy Ghost ; Moe, Larry, Curly; and so on) . At the risk...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper it is argued, on the basis of a quantitative analysis of spontaneous speech errors and their corrections in Dutch, that the mechanism leading to lexical bias in speech errors cannot be same as that leading to overt self-corrections. Although spontaneous speech errors show a strong lexical bias, overt self-corrections do not. Lexical b...
Article
Full-text available
Crossmodal semantic priming is often considered to be a valid technique for measuring the activation of multiple word candidates, particularly if used with auditory prime words cut off before their offset. In previous studies, the technique has been used to show that the activation of multiple candidates is modulated by preceding context. However,...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This study investigates whether subjects use a strategy of word recognition in a rhyme-monitoring task. Results suggest that this is indeed the case. In addition, however, the task introduces an effect of phonological priming of the cue word
Article
Full-text available
Research Institute for Language and Speech (OTS) 3512 JK UTRECHT The Netherlands Many years ago, at a meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Katherine Harris asked me whether declination of pitch in speech could provide information on the amount of preprogramming in speech production. I do not recall my answer, but it must have been very uns...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports some production and perception experiments challenging the idea that the rate of articulation of interpause intervals of speech is solely conditioned by internal phonological factors. The results reported demonstrate that, at least for one professional newsreader, rate of articulation in interpause intervals is conditioned by con...
Article
Full-text available
A study was done on whether a voice?source model, in particular the Liljencrants?Fant model, codes information that is used by listeners to identify speakers by their voices. Automatic analysis/resynthesis techniques were used to generate so?called hybrid vowels for which the voice?source characteristics of one speaker are combined with the vocal?t...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports two experiments examining whether or not auditory word recognition is more sensitive to word‐initial than to word‐final stimulus information. In the first experiment the contributions of prefixes and suffixes to word recognition were compared. These affixes carried widely varying amounts of lexical information and were added to...
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on an experiment examining some perceptual consequences of correspondences between accent patterns, the distribution of plus and minus focus, and the distribution of new and given information in Dutch spoken sentences. "Accent patterns" refer here to the distribution of intonational accents over spoken sentences. Each accent ma...
Article
Full-text available
Accentuation results in faster recognition of words expressing new (focal) information. To find out whether accentuation speeds up the comprehension of words expressing given information as well, the presence or absence of accents was varied independently for these categories in three experiments. Degree of Givenness was varied across experiments....
Article
Full-text available
Knowing the position of lexical stress in a polysyllabic word may considerably limit the number of lexically possible responses. Thus perceptual cues may contribute to a higher probability of correct recognition and faster recognition of words in the perception of speech of less than optimal quality. Probability correct was assessed for 30 three?sy...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper attempts to explain some aspects of prosodie timing in speech. Current explanatory principles such as ›isochrony‹, ›anticipatory shortenings‹ and ›time compression of motor commands in short-term storage‹ are blamed for begging the question. An alternative, functional, view is proposed, relating prosodie timing to requirements of efficie...
Article
Full-text available
Timing patterns in speech show a number of regularities which have been established many times for many different languages, such as the shorter average duration and greater durational variability of unstressed as compared to stressed syllables, the decrease of syllable duration with increasing word length, anticipatory shortening of syllables in w...
Article
Full-text available
The present paper reports on an experiment which was set up to examine whether we can make a speaker either accent or de-accent particular words by systematically varying the objective probability that a particular referent will be mentioned (and therewith the referent's predictability for speaker and listener). In the experiment each of 24 speaker...
Article
Full-text available
In Exp I, 10 Ss were exposed to resynthesized speech with completely monotonous pitch. It was shown that intelligibility of the target message could be manipulated by introducing an artificial constant difference in pitch between target speech and interfering speech. Intelligibility increased with increasing difference in pitch. In Exp II with 20 c...
Article
Full-text available
At the Institute for Perception Research (IPO) speech is studied with the aid of a system called 'SPARX', for SPeech Analysis and Resynthesis eXperiments. It is based on the commonly accepted 'synthesis model' for speech production, consisting of a sound source that produces a 'voiced' pulse series or 'unvoiced' noise both with a flat spectral enve...
Article
Full-text available
Earlier research has led to a ?grammar of Dutch intonation,? i.e., a set of rules for generating a suitable pitch contour for any to be synthesized Dutch sentence. However, before these rules can be applied the location of the pitch accents and prosodic boundaries must be specified. As a first step towards accent location rules, the accentuation be...
Article
Full-text available
Reports on an experiment with 60 Dutch-speaking college students in which each stimulus was either an initial or final fragment and contained just enough information to distinguish the intended word uniquely from all other words in the lexicon. The main findings support a model of lexical access based on first-order context-sensitive coding of spee...
Article
Full-text available
A series of experiments was conducted to determine (1) the accuracy with which vowel segment durations in spoken sentences can be represented in auditory sensory storage and (2) the extent to which phoneme boundaries in the identification of phonemic vowel length in Dutch are affected by syntactic and/or auditory-phonetic context. In a preliminary...
Chapter
Full-text available
What we know best about speech perception is what it is not. It is most unlike the process to which one is forced in deciphering a letter in almost illegible handwriting.In the strategy adopted with this kind of emergency the analytical knowledge obtained in studying the end of the letter is used to understand the beginning and vice versa, the orig...
Article
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Article
Full-text available
A basic assumption of the research reported upon here is that measurable vowel duration is at least partly controlled by an independent phonetic feature of vowel length. We have studied manifestations of this feature by measuring articulatory segment durations of a number of Dutch short vowels, long vowels and diphthongs, in nonsense words of the f...
Article
Full-text available
Mental preparation for production is supposed to be more automatic for phrasal lexical items (PLIs) than for novel phrases (NPs). Automatic processes are thought to be less error prone and less closely monitored than novel processes. From this it is predicted that speech errors are less often detected and repaired by speakers when made in PLIs than...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Inspontaneous,speech stock phrases like idioms and clichés are very frequent. It is a reasonable ,assumption ,that uttering such stock phrases is more ,routine than uttering new ,expressions. The main assumption tested here is that, due to this routine-like character, the production of stock phrases is less closely monitored,for speech ,er...
Article
Full-text available
Dominant models of speech production have employed linguistic components with a high degree of functional specialization, positing that phonological processing occurs only after semantic and syntactic processing has been completed. It has also been claimed, however, that processing at the phonological level can affect syntactic structure. The exper...
Article
Full-text available
This paper attempts to answer two questions: (a) What is the cause of lexical bias in phonological speech errors? (b) Is there phoneme-to-word feedback in speech production? An experiment is reported adapted from Baars, Motley, and MacKay (1), eliciting word-word and nonword-nonword spoonerisms. Three modifications were made: (1) There was ample ti...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I present new evidence, stemming both from an experiment and from spontaneous speech, demonstrating that (a) lexical bias is caused by self-monitoring of inner speech, as proposed by Levelt et al. (6), and (b) that there is phoneme-to- word feedback in the mental programming of speech, as supposed by Dell (2) and Stemberger (10). It i...
Article
Full-text available
In a classical SLIP task spoonerisms are elicited with either a lexical or a nonlexical outcome. If the frequency of a particular class of responses is affected by the lexicality of the expected spoonerisms, this indicates that many such responses have replaced elicited spoonerisms in inner speech. This is shown in early interrupted speech errors a...
Article
Full-text available
This chapter proposes some improvements on a method for eliciting speech errors, the so-called SLIP technique, including the use of multi-level logistic regression for data analysis. This is demonstrated in an experimental test of a new theory of self- monitoring as the main cause of lexical bias in phonological speech errors.
Article
Seminar Department of Linguistics, University of Canterbury

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Projects (2)
Project
Self-monitoring of speech errors
Project
1) Provide observational evidence that speech errors are detected by self-monitoring both internal and overt speech. 2) Provide observational evidence that there are two strategies for repairing speech errors, viz. fast repairs employing activated correct target forms, and slow repairs employing re-planning of de-activated correct target forms. 3) Exploring to what extent self-monitoring of overt speech depends on auditory feedback.