Siddhartha Khare

Siddhartha Khare
Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee | University of Roorkee · Department of Civil Engineering

Ph.D.
Assistant Professor at IIT Roorkee and Academic Associate at Habitat, Canada

About

32
Publications
16,606
Reads
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129
Citations
Introduction
My research interest is to analyse forest diversity using multi-source, multi-temporal remote sensing data . My main research focuses on dense time series analysis of phenology, invasive plant species identification, mapping and biodiversity assessment of moist deciduous forests in the Western Himalaya, India. Current research focuses on for the spatial characterization of tree growth by the integration of spatially-continuous variables and to describe the spatial pattern of tree phenology and radial growth across the boreal forest.
Additional affiliations
February 2022 - present
Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Position
  • Assistant Professor
October 2020 - February 2022
McGill University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • http://gonzalezlab.weebly.com/team.html
October 2019 - November 2019
University of Naples Federico II
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2013 - August 2017
Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Field of study
  • Geomatics Engineering (Remote Sensing and GIS)
July 2010 - June 2012
Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee
Field of study
  • Geomatics Engineering (Remote Sensing and GIS)
July 2005 - June 2009
Shri Vaishanav Institute of Technology & Science
Field of study
  • Electronics and Communication Engineering

Publications

Publications (32)
Article
The resurgent frequency of extreme weather events and their strongly distinctive spatial patterns lead to a growing interest in phenology as an indicator of tree susceptibility. Using a long-term chronology of observations collected in situ, we predicted and investigated the spatial patterns and environmental drivers of spring leaf phenology across...
Article
Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and normalized difference red-edge index (NDRE) are vegetation indices commonly used in agriculture to provide information on crop’s growth and health. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of both indices to management practices in lowbush blueberry fields. Images of the experimental plots were collect...
Data
Supplementary Materials for publication titled as : Comparing Time-Lapse PhenoCams with Satellite Observations across the Boreal Forest of Quebec, Canada (https://www.mdpi.com/2072-4292/14/1/100/htm)
Article
Full-text available
Intercomparison of satellite-derived vegetation phenology is scarce in remote locations because of the limited coverage area and low temporal resolution of field observations. By their reliable near-ground observations and high-frequency data collection, PhenoCams can be a robust tool for intercomparison of land surface phenology derived from satel...
Article
Full-text available
Freely available satellite data at Google Earth Engine (GEE) cloud platform enables vegetation phenology analysis across different scales very efficiently. We evaluated seasonal and annual phenology of the old-growth Hyrcanian forests (HF) of northern Iran covering an area of ca. 1.9 million ha, and also focused on 15 UNESCO World Heritage Sites. W...
Article
Aim In boreal ecosystems, phenological events display seasonal patterns. These patterns allow for the development of tissues during the short time window available for growth in cold climates. Primary and secondary growth, two expensive processes for plants, are supposedly modulated in time to optimize allocation of carbon to bud and woody tissues....
Article
Acer saccharum and Acer rubrum, two main maple species in North America, will be affected by ongoing global warming. Several studies predict a southern limit contraction but limited northward expansion of maple distribution for the future. We aimed to understand the main drivers of current maple distribution to quantify potential changes to maple h...
Code
Khare, Siddhartha (2020), “Data for: A 15-year spatio-temporal analysis of plant β-diversity using Landsat time series derived Rao's Q index”, Mendeley Data, V1, doi: 10.17632/9v72bdyxfk.1
Article
Full-text available
Understanding temporal dynamics of plant biodiversity is crucial for conservation strategies at regional and local levels. The mostly applied hitherto methods are based on field observations of the plant communities and the related taxa. Satellite earth observation time series offer continuous and wider coverage for the assessment of plant diversit...
Article
Full-text available
Intraspecific studies with populations replicated in different sites allow the effects of genotype and environment on wood features and plant growth to be distinguished. Based on climate change predictions, this distinction is important for establishing future patterns in the distribution of tree species. We quantified the effects of genotype and e...
Article
Full-text available
Late frost can cause damage to trees, especially to the developing bud of broadleaf species in spring. Through long-term adaptation, plants adjust leaf phenology to achieve an optimal trade-off between growing season length and frost avoidance. In this study, we aim to assess ecotypic differentiation in leaf development of sugar maple populations p...
Article
Full-text available
Bud and leaf development are important phenological events and help in defining the growing period of trees. Canopy greenness derived from PhenoCam has been used to investigate leaf phenology. Questions remain on how much the continuous records of canopy greenness represent bud developmental phases, and how growing period boundaries are related to...
Article
Full-text available
Satellite remote sensing is a widely accessible tool to investigate the spatiotemporal variations in the bud phenology of evergreen species, which show limited seasonal changes in canopy greenness. However, there is a need for precise and compatible data to compare remote sensing time series with field observations. In this study, fortnightly MODIS...
Conference Paper
In mountainous areas with sparse woody vegetation, tree cover is among the most crucial indicators for landscape conservation and ecosystem stability. It is thus essential to be continuously monitored, which is yet seriously hurdled by harsh topography and inaccessibility. Field-based methods are time consuming and costly and are thus particularly...
Conference Paper
Bud phenology is a sensitive indicator of climate change. Therefore, it's important to understand the direct relationship of canopy greenness and bud phenological events at higher spatial and temporal resolutions. Recently, phenocam based near surface remote sensing methods has been extensively used for time series analysis of canopy greenness to m...
Conference Paper
Accurate and up-to-date monitoring of forests at mountainous regions at regular time interval is a challenging task. Remote sensing derived metrics such as vegetation indices are the most widely used tools for the estimation of forests phenological attributes and ecosystem monitoring. Thus, in this study, assessment of spectral traits has been carr...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive plant species are major threats to biodiversity. They can be identified and monitored by means of high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery. This study aimed to test the potential of multiple very high-resolution (VHR) optical multispectral and stereo imageries (VHRSI) at spatial resolutions of 1.5 and 5 m to quantify the presence of...
Conference Paper
Abstract: Terrorism is an international problem which has raised its ugly head in various places in the world. However State sponsored terrorism is unique to Pakistan where it is being used as an instrument of state to Target India. Kashmir being the bone of contention between India and Pakistan became the perfect ground to breed terrorism. But the...
Poster
Full-text available
It has always been an ecologically challenging task to assess the species diversity in large and inaccessible areas such as mountain forests due to difficulties in covering the entire (or representative) range of available species by insufficient field sampling and limitation of ground based observations to cover spatially larger extents. On the co...
Technical Report
Full-text available
With the availability of very high and high spatial resolution optical stereo-pair datasets such as SPOT-6/7, CARTOSAT-I and II, GeoEye-I, WorldView-2 and 3, it is now possible to generate high accuracy Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). It seems to be a better alternative to LiDAR datasets specifically in those countries where airborne data are eith...
Technical Report
Full-text available
QGIS is an open source software with basic and advance GIS capabilities. This is a hands-on introductory training manual for those who are new to GIS and want to use QGIS and its other plugins for GIS related work.
Article
Full-text available
The health (or greenness) of the mountainous vegetation varies with seasons depending on its type and local topographic and climatic conditions. The forests in the Western Himalayas are influenced by variables such as precipitation and temperatures through seasons with considerable inter-annual variability. This study presents the phenological be...
Article
Full-text available
We used a full remote sensing-based approach to assess plant species diversity in large and inaccessible areas affected by Lantana camara L., a common invasive species within the deciduous forests of Western Himalayan region of India, using spectral heterogeneity information extracted from optical data. The spread of L. camara was precisely mapped...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
To assess the phenological changes in Moist Deciduous Forest (MDF) of western Himalayan region of India, we carried out NDVI time series analysis from 2013 to 2015 using Landsat 8 OLI data. We used the vegetation index differencing method to calculate the change in NDVI (NDVIchange) during pre and post monsoon seasons and these changes were used to...
Article
Full-text available
To assess the phenological changes in Moist Deciduous Forest (MDF) of western Himalayan region of India, we carried out NDVI time series analysis from 2013 to 2015 using Landsat 8 OLI data. We used the vegetation index differencing method to calculate the change in NDVI (NDVI<sub>change</sub>) during pre and post monsoon seasons and these changes w...
Article
Conservation of biodiversity is an essential issue due to increasing climate change and anthropological factors. Various rich biodiversity zones are greatly threatened and degrading with an alarming rate therefore it's required to safeguard these zones and their habitats at regional and local levels. In order to implement significant conservation s...
Presentation
Full-text available
Remote sensing -assisted extraction of biodiversity indices (Simpson Diversity, Diversity Index) using an object-oriented approach. The approach also followed a regression modeling of field-based biodiversity parameters based on NDVI values in forests in west Himalayan region of India.

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Projects

Projects (4)
Project
https://www.mdpi.com/journal/sensors/special_issues/Phenological_Studies#editors The interest in phenological studies has experienced a surprising increase in the last decade, demonstrating the dramatic global effects of climate change on natural ecosystems. Phenology, and the timings of recurrent biological events, represents the close relationships between the organisms and their surrounding environment. Multispectral sensors mounted in remote or near-ground platforms can provide reliable data to estimate phenology at different time (from daily to annual) and spatial (from the individual to the landscape or the ecosystem) scales. The recent availability of visible, multispectral, and hyperspectral sensors offers new opportunities to detect phenology with high resolution and precision. The actual sensors installed for near-surface remote sensing, as well as airborne and satellite remote sensing, are able to collect information in wide spectral bands and capture broad-scale phenological patterns with a suitable degree of homogeneity and standardization. Under this perspective, we expect and welcome high-quality contributions on the evaluation and use of various sensors in phenological studies of plants and animals. Phenological records derived from visible, multispectral, and hyperspectral sensors are involved in numerous applications, including the fields of ecology, biogeography, climatology, forestry, agriculture, climate changes, and wildfire. This Special Issue brings together the recent advancements and development of sensors used for phenological studies. The topics include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Animal and plant phenology; 2. Phenology at the level of individual, stand, community, ecosystem, or biome; 3. Comparison of satellite derived vegetation indices for vegetation phenology; 4. Comparison of time series visible, multispectral, and hyperspectral sensors; 5. Relationship of sensor-derived phenology with direct or field observations; 6. Multi-scale and multi-temporal assessment of phenology; 7. Phenological reconstructions based on sensor measurements; 8. Sensor optimization; 9. Calibration and validation of sensors for phenological investigations; 10. Sensors and phenological networks; 11. Technology and application of PhenoCams; 12. Development of vegetation indices using sensors.
Project
1) To describe the spatial pattern of tree phenology and radial growth across the boreal forest of Quebec, (2) To identify and quantify the effect of climate on these patterns, (3) To construct spatially explicit models of radial growth.