Sibel Bargu

Sibel Bargu
Louisiana State University | LSU · Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences (DOCS)

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34
Publications
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Introduction
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Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Full-text available
Louisiana estuaries are important habitats in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a region undergoing significant and sustained human- and climate-driven changes. This paper synthesizes data collected over multiple years from four Louisiana estuaries – Breton Sound, Terrebonne Bay, the Atchafalaya River Delta Estuary, and Vermilion Bay – to characterize t...
Article
Full-text available
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are increasing globally in frequency, persistence, and geographic extent, posing a threat to ecosystem and human health. To date, no occurrences of marine phycotoxins have been recorded in Mozambique, which may be due to absence of a monitoring program and general awareness of potential threats. This study is the first d...
Article
Full-text available
The Deepwater Horizon oil spill of 2010 brought the ecology and health of the Gulf of Mexico to the forefront of the public's and scientific community's attention. Not only did we need a better understanding of how this oil spill impacted the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, but we also needed to apply this knowledge to help assess impacts from perturbati...
Article
Full-text available
Domoic acid (DA) is a potent food web transferred algal toxin that has caused dramatic mortality events involving sea birds and sea lions. Although no con®rmed DA toxicity events have been reported in whales, here we present data demonstrating that humpback and blue whales are exposed to the toxin and consume DA contaminated prey. Whale fecal sampl...
Article
Deltaic and coastal ecosystems are changing in response to natural and anthropogenic forces that require ecosystem-level restoration efforts to avoid habitat degradation or loss. Models that link ecosystem components of hydrodynamics, morphodynamics, nutrient and vegetation dynamics to represent essential processes and feedbacks are advancing the f...
Preprint
Full-text available
Frequent blooms of phytoplankton occur in coastal upwelling zones creating hotspots of biological productivity in the ocean. As cold, nutrient-rich water is brought up to sunlit layers from depth, phytoplankton are also transported upwards to seed surface blooms that are often dominated by diatoms. The physiological response of phytoplankton to thi...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in iron (Fe) bioavailability influence diatom physiology and community composition, and thus have a profound impact on primary productivity and ecosystem dynamics. Iron limitation of diatom growth rates has been demonstrated in both oceanic and coastal waters of the Northeast Pacific Ocean and is predicted to become more pervasive in future...
Article
Full-text available
Pesticides may enter water bodies in areas with a high proportion of agricultural land use through surface runoff, groundwater discharge, and erosion and thus negatively impact nontarget aquatic organisms. The herbicide atrazine is used extensively throughout the Midwest and enters the Mississippi River through surface runoff and groundwater discha...
Article
Full-text available
The presence of domoic acid (DA) toxin from multiple species of Pseudo-nitzschia is a concern in the highly productive food webs of the northern Gulf of Mexico. We documented the Pseudo-nitzschia presence, abundance, blooms, and toxicity over three years along a transect ∼100 km west of the Mississippi River Delta on the continental shelf. Pseudo-n...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure of phytoplankton to the water-accommodated fraction of crude oil can elicit a number of stress responses, but the mechanisms that drive these responses are unclear. South Louisiana crude oil was selected to investigate its effects on population growth, chlorophyll a (Chl a) content, antioxidative defense, and lipid peroxidation, for the ma...
Article
Full-text available
A literature review demonstrates that crude oil spills can affect phytoplankton, favoring the growth of some while inhibiting the growth of others. Subsequently, the phytoplankton assemblage can change as a result of exposure to crude oil. Studies of phytoplankton responses to the Macondo (Deepwater Horizon) oil spill indicate that the phytoplankto...
Article
Full-text available
Impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on phytoplankton, particularly, the tolerability and changes to the toxin profiles of harmful toxic algal species remain unknown. The degree to which oil-affected sympatric Karenia brevis, Prorocentrum minimum, and Heterosigma akashiwo, all of which are ecologically important species in the Gulf of Mexico,...
Article
Full-text available
We conducted controlled laboratory exposure experiments to assess the toxic effects of water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of South Louisiana sweet crude oil on five phytoplankton species isolated from the Gulf of Mexico. Experiments were conducted with individual and combinations of the five phytoplankton species to determine growth inhibitions to...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines the potential effects of exposure to South Louisiana sweet crude oil (LSC), Corexit(®) EC9500A, and dispersed oil on enclosed phytoplankton communities under different nutrient regimes. Three distinct microcosm experiments were conducted for 10 days to assess changes to the structure of natural communities from the Gulf of Mexic...
Article
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are major components of crude oil, are responsible in large part for the toxicity of crude oil to phytoplankton. This study addressed the following question. Can reliable predictions of the aquatic toxicity of crude oil, a multi-component mixture, be described from toxicity data on individual PAH compo...
Article
Blooms of the toxin-producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia commonly occur in Monterey Bay, California, resulting in sea lion mortality events. The links between strandings of California sea lions suffering from domoic acid (DA) toxicity, toxic cell numbers, and their associated DA concentration in Monterey Bay and in sea lion feces were examined from 20...
Article
Full-text available
Short-term effects of two consecutive hurricanes on physical, chemical, and biological factors were examined in a Louisiana coastal lagoon (Bay Champagne) with a focus on effects to basal food resources. Hurricanes Gustav and Ike made landfall on Louisiana's coast on 1 and 13 September 2008, respectively. Water column and sediment chlorophyll a (Ch...
Article
Full-text available
Although many advanced hydrodynamic models have been developed in the last several decades, the exchange of water and waterborne materials in coastal waters can only be accurately quantified by continuous and long-term observations. A good and reliable model product also relies on accurate observations for boundary and initial conditions, as well a...
Chapter
Toxic algal blooms are occurring on a more frequent basis and have been shown to cause harm in higher trophic levels. The diatom toxin domoic acid, produced by the genus Pseudo-nitzschia, has been shown to be responsible for the contamination of shellfish, zooplankton, and fish around the world. Contaminations have impacted various economical marke...
Article
Full-text available
Inlets provide a critical ecological link between restricted bays and estuaries to the coastal ocean. The net fluxes of water and suspended sediment are presented in this study. These fluxes are obtained based on data from a multidisciplinary, full tidal cycle survey across Barataria Pass in southern Louisiana on 31 July to 1 August 2008. The veloc...
Article
Full-text available
Near-surface waters ranging from the Pacific subarctic (58°N) to the Southern Ocean (66°S) contain the neurotoxin domoic acid (DA), associated with the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. Of the 35 stations sampled, including ones from historic iron fertilization experiments (SOFeX, IronEx II), we found Pseudo-nitzschia at 34 stations and DA measurable at 14...
Article
The loading of nitrogen to coastal aquatic ecosystems can result in increased algal production and subsequent low dissolved oxygen. In April 2008, predictions for extreme flood stage for the Lower Mississippi River triggered the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway which is a major release valve for the river which empties into Lake Pontchartrain,...
Article
High nitrogen (N) loading to coastal aquatic systems can be expressed as increased algal production and subsequent low dissolved oxygen. In April, 2008, predictions for extreme flood stage for the Lower Mississippi River triggered the opening of the Bonnet Carré Spillway, a major release valve for the river. The spillway diverted approximately 8 km...
Article
Domoic acid is a glutaminergic neurotoxin produced by marine algae such as Pseudo-nitzschia australis. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) ingest the toxin when foraging on planktivorous fish. Adult females comprise 60% of stranded animals admitted for rehabilitation due to acute domoic acid toxicosis and commonly suffer from reproductive...
Article
Over the past decade diatom blooms of domoic acid (DA)-producing Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have been responsible for numerous marine mammal and bird mortalities in Monterey Bay, CA. One possible toxin vector is the market squid, Loligo opalescens, a small pelagic mollusk that plays an important role in the near-shore food web of the California Current...
Article
Both the interactions between toxic phytoplankton and their grazers, and the transport of these toxins through the food chain are relatively poorly understood. Recently, species of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia have been found to produce the neurotoxin domoic acid, which has caused detrimental effects to higher trophic levels in the food web. One of...
Article
Krill are important grazers on diatoms and critical prey items for many high level carnivores in Monterey Bay and elsewhere along the California coast. Here, some of the higher level consumers have recently been shown to be severely affected by the toxin, domoic acid (DA), a secondary metabolite of some species of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. To un...
Article
Domoic acid (DA) is a potent food web transferred algal toxin that has caused dramatic mortality events involving sea birds and sea lions. Although no confirmed DA toxicity events have been reported in whales, here we present data demonstrating that humpback and blue whales are exposed to the toxin and consume DA contaminated prey. Whale fecal samp...
Article
Full-text available
Several species of the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia H. PeragalIo in H. & M. PeragalIo, 1897-1908 are known to produce domoic acid (DA), a neurotoxic amino acid that has been shown to be responsible for deaths of higher trophic-level organisms, including humans, in many areas around the world. In this study, one of the potentially toxic Pseudo- nitzschia...
Article
Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Santa Cruz 2001. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 118-130).
Article
Typescript. Thesis (M.S.)--University of California, Santa Cruz, 1998. Includes bibliographical references.

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