Shyam Pariyar

Shyam Pariyar
University of Bonn | Uni Bonn · Institute of Crop Science and Resource Conservation (INRES) - Plant Nutrition

PhD
Research and Teaching

About

22
Publications
2,444
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394
Citations
Introduction
I am a currently working at INRES-Plant Nutrition, University of Bonn. My research interests are: i) Cropping System shift, yield and quality ii) Supply - demand synchrony in nutrients management, iii) Abiotic stress and stress physiology, iv) Crop residues recycling, high value molecules and Bioeconomy and v) Plant health management, all based in lab to farmers field. My teaching activities include plant health management, crop abiotic stress (& sensing) and recent advances in plant nutrition.
Additional affiliations
April 2015 - present
University of Bonn
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
In times of a constantly growing world population and increasing demand for food, sustainable agriculture is crucial. The rainfastness of plant protection agents is of pivotal importance to reduce the amount of applied nutrients, herbicides, and fungicides. As a result of protective agent wash-off, plant protection is lost, and soils and groundwate...
Article
Full-text available
Tantalum (Ta) is gaining attention as a biomaterial in bone tissue engineering. Although the clinical advantage of Ta-based implants for primary and revision total joint replacement (TJA) has been well documented, few studies investigated the effect of wear products of Ta implants on peri-implant cells, and their potential contribution to aseptic i...
Article
Rain wash-off of foliar-applied agrochemical formulations (i.e. active ingredients) is a key topic to ensure crop protection under rainy conditions and for some regions will gain higher importance due to global climate change. Rain-induced wash-off is determined by intensity and amount of rain, as well as by characteristics of the active ingredient...
Article
Full-text available
Maximize process of pest control reducing loss in the agriculture process is fundamental. The aim this research was to achieve a different way to increase the herbicide activity, using potassium salts. Some experiments were conduct to analyze the efficiency of salts in enhanced the activity of two selected herbicides (paraquat and bromoxynil). Firs...
Article
Full-text available
To reduce pesticide use while preserving crop productivity alternative pest and disease control measures are needed. We thought of an alternative way of functionalizing leaves of the soybean crop to fight its most severe disease, Asian soybean rust (Phakopsora pachyrhizi). To do so, we produced bifunctional peptides that adhere to the soybean leaf...
Article
Anthropogenic aerosol pollution has intensified in (semi)-urban environments. Plant surfaces can accumulate a part of these aerosol particles in the terrestrial ecosystem. The deposition of aerosols on plant surfaces is a continuous process and is expected to be especially high in peri-urban agricultural environments. However, the deposited aerosol...
Article
Adjuvants such as surfactants are commonly incorporated into agrochemical formulations to enhance the biological efficiency of foliar sprays by improving the wetting behavior of the spray and/or the penetration of the active ingredients into the leaf tissues. Penetration accelerating adjuvants are known to increase the cuticular permeability and ma...
Article
Full-text available
Some 40 years ago, air pollution caused widespread forest decline in Central Europe and eastern North America. More recently, high levels of tree mortality worldwide are thought to be driven by rising temperatures and increasing atmospheric drought. A neglected factor, possibly contributing to both phenomena, is the foliar accumulation of hygroscop...
Article
Full-text available
Previous flux measurements in the perhumid cloud forest of northeastern Taiwan have shown efficient photosynthesis of the endemic tree species Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana even under foggy conditions in which leaf surface moisture would be expected. We hypothesized this to be the result of 'xeromorphic' traits of the Chamaecyparis leaves (hy...
Article
The atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (vpd) is the driving force for plant transpiration. Plants have different strategies to respond to this ‘atmospheric drought.’ Deposited aerosols on the surface of plant leaves can interact with plant water relations and may influence the vpd response of plants. We studied the transpiration and water use effic...
Article
Air pollution causes the amorphous appearance of epicuticular waxes in conifers, usually called wax 'degradation' or 'erosion', which is often correlated with tree damage symptoms, e.g., winter desiccation. Previous investigations concentrated on wax chemistry, with little success. Here, we address the hypothesis that both 'wax degradation' and dec...
Article
Aerosols are an ubiquitous component of the atmospheric environment of plants but their ecophysiological role is largely unknown. Here we address this role by comparing the water relations of plants grown in ventilated greenhouses with ambient air (AA), and filtered air (FA) where particle concentrations had been reduced by more than 99%. Beans and...
Article
The recent visualization of stomatal nanoparticle uptake ended a 40-yr-old paradigm. Assuming clean, hydrophobic leaf surfaces, the paradigm considered stomatal liquid water transport to be impossible as a result of water surface tension. However, real leaves are not clean, and deposited aerosols may change hydrophobicity and water surface tension....
Article
Theoretical explanations of dew formation usually consider a pure, plain surface and do not include any contributions of hygroscopic material present on this surface. A significant amount of hygroscopic material, however, is present on most real leaves, due to accumulated deposited aerosols, salt exudations, leached ions, or agricultural sprays. Si...
Conference Paper
Nutrient input by atmospheric particles is important or even essential for forest ecosystems. Many particles will first deposit to leaf surfaces. Competition is avoided by direct foliar uptake, compared to uptake via the soil. While there is meanwhile clear evidence for foliar uptake to happen via the stomata under natural conditions, this requires...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
- Understand interactions between crop plant surfaces, active substances including agriculture additives and biotic stress - enhancce nutrients (or active compounds) uptake and release on crop plants - increase resource use efficiency and reduce environmental contamination
Project
Reducing copper fungicide load in agriculture and environmental contamination