Shobhana Chelliah

Shobhana Chelliah
University of North Texas | UNT · Linguistics and The College of Information

Professor

About

49
Publications
9,043
Reads
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500
Citations
Citations since 2016
24 Research Items
334 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (49)
Article
Full-text available
Language archives, like other scholarly digital repositories, are built with two major audiences in mind. These are depositors of language data and various potential end-users of these materials: researchers (linguistics and others), language communities, students, educators, artists, etc. Being a relatively new phenomenon, language archives have m...
Conference Paper
Language archives are not only a valuable resource for language communities to tell their stories and to create lasting records of their ways of life, but also for those interested in anthropology, linguistics, agriculture, or art history. This recent emphasis on archiving primary datasets in linguistics has resulted in an abundance of datasets onl...
Article
Language archives are repositories of language data: material about or in a set of languages, including audio and video recordings, transcriptions, translations, and linguistic annotations. Beyond their value for academic applications, digital availability of language data holds potential to support language and cultural revitalization and maintena...
Chapter
This chapter provides vignettes of language endangerment in Nepal, Tasmania, Mexico, northeast India, Hungary, and North America. The cases discussed illustrate factors that contribute to the endangerment of languages, including: natural disasters; local and geopolitics leading to genocide, forced migration, and political instability; government po...
Chapter
We consider how language documentation corpora are created: what is documented, how it is documented, and who is doing the documenting. The methods used in collecting language samples are far-ranging, including techniques used by folklorists, ethnomusicologists, descriptive and typological linguists, and anthropologists. Documentary linguists recor...
Chapter
Throughout this book we have seen that the activities of language documentation (curation, analysis, and archiving) have impacts on language science but also on people, products, and methods. For students of linguistics, language documentation is a way of learning about the world, traveling to new places and making new friends. For native language...
Chapter
This chapter provides an overview of primary motivations for linguistic fieldwork, language description, and language documentation. The work of Franz Boas, Edward Sapir, Mary Haas, John Peabody Harrington, Dell Hymes, and Joel Sherzer continue to influence methods of data collection and the types of data language documenters collect. We discuss th...
Chapter
Where intergenerational transmission of languages and cultures is no longer occurring, language documentation functions as critical intervention. Resources created through documentation serve to link language users to past practices, affirm identity, and support language revitalization and reclamation. Case studies presented in this chapter illustr...
Chapter
The chapter considers examples of how languages frame the location of an entity with respect to the speaker and how this framing reveals ways in which humans encode their experiences and environment. We also discuss how language documentation improves our understanding of language history and change. Finally, we consider how verbal art forms reveal...
Chapter
This chapter reviews efforts at supporting linguistic vitality, including the use of surveys to raise consciousness about the status of language use; catalogs that provide basic facts about low resourced languages; the language archiving movement, which provides state-of-the-art repositories for language materials; funding and other research activi...
Book
This book offers the latest insights on language documentation, a reborn, refashioned, and reenergized subfield of linguistics motivated by the urgent task of creating a record of the world’s fast disappearing languages. Language documentation provides data to challenge and improve existing linguistic theory. In addition, because it requires input...
Article
Lamkang is a Trans-Himalayan language spoken in the Chandel District of Manipur, India by under 10,000 ethnically Naga people. Due to a complex person indexation system in Lamkang clauses, multiple prefixes with the shape C- are attached to a verb stem creating lexemes with the shape CCCCVC. To make such forms pronounceable, speakers insert super-s...
Chapter
Full-text available
There are two exciting facets of language description: the fieldwork experience, which is necessary for data collection, and the process of discovery and analysis that leads to the description of the target language. In order for our record of language structures to be as accurate as possible, data collection is best conducted using rigorous method...
Chapter
Full-text available
The purpose of this chapter is set up a blueprint on how to design and carry out a language documentation project for an endangered spoken language. In reality, no one blueprint will suffice since there are many documenter profiles and a variety conditions for language endangerment. For instance, the documenter may be a leading figure in a communit...
Article
Cambridge Core - Research Methods in Linguistics - edited by Robert J. Podesva
Chapter
Research Methods in Linguistics - edited by Robert J. Podesva January 2014
Article
Full-text available
This paper is a position statement on reproducible research in linguistics, including data citation and attribution, that represents the collective views of some 41 colleagues. Reproducibility can play a key role in increasing verification and accountability in linguistic research, and is a hallmark of social science research that is currently unde...
Article
Linguists continue a longstanding debate about the best methods for data gathering for language description and documentation. Under discussion is whether data gathered through elicitation of targeted structures through translations from a contact language or elicitation of grammaticality judgments gathers data to accurately represent the structure...
Article
We expect linguistic areas in geographically delimited regions because, as has been seen universally, languages tend to influence each other when in contact. In linguistic areas we expect to see shared distinctive traits between some of the languages in the area. This paper reflects on why it is that Manipur (Northeast India), which hosts within it...
Article
Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society: General Session and Parasession on The Place of Morphology in a Grammar (1992), pp. 287-297
Book
Acknowledgements.- Chapter 1. Introduction.- Chapter 2. Definition and Goals of Descriptive Linguistic Fieldwork.- Chapter 3. The History of Linguistic Fieldwork.- Chapter 4: Choosing a Language.- Chapter 5: Field Preparation: Research, Psychological and Practical.- Chapter 6: Fieldwork Ethics: the Rights and Responsibilities of the Fieldworker.- C...
Article
There has been a great deal of discussion in recent years on the responsibilities of the fieldworker with respect to the community whose language is being studied. As Dwyer (2006:50) puts it, “The ethical requirements of fieldwork-based investigation are complex, as they demand that the researcher attend both to a respectful and reciprocal relation...
Article
We define descriptive linguistic fieldwork as the investigation of the structure of a language through the collection of primary language data gathered through interaction with native-speaking consultants. Many other definitions emphasize the notion that the fieldworker must live like and with the native speakers of the language to be studied. For...
Article
Within descriptive linguistic fieldwork, as we define it ( Chapter 2), lexicography or dictionary writing can be considered a tangential activity. This might seem surprising in view of the modern fieldworker’s adoption of the Boasian trilogy, which considers that, for a language to be documented or described, we need a grammar, a collection of text...
Article
There is no single right way of doing fieldwork, but there are some wrong ways. For example, it would be wrong for a fieldworker to begin a data gathering session with no knowledge of the possible grammatical structures that s/he is about to encounter.
Article
Having decided what language to work on and having arrived at the field site, the fieldworker must find native speakers to work with. Here are seven basic questions that s/he should consider when looking for speakers: 1. When should I begin looking for and hiring native speakers for fieldwork? 2. What is the role of each native speaker in my projec...
Article
This chapter focuses on grammar gathering techniques. By “grammar” we mean the morphology and syntax of a language. Phonology and phonetics data gathering techniques were addressed in Chapter 10. In this introduction, we present preliminary questions about grammar gathering techniques (Section 12.1.1), and then discuss issues of terminology and cla...
Article
In this final chapter, we discuss the importance of semantics and pragmatics to descriptive linguistic fieldwork. We also provide a guide to text collection, which we feel should be a central part of the corpus used for language analysis, and which is intimately linked to issues of semantics and pragmatics.
Article
Having decided to undertake descriptive linguistic fieldwork, the researcher must tackle the complex preparations necessary for the trip. First, in addition to general typological study (see Chapter 11), a fieldworker must read materials specific to the language and culture being investigated. Second, a fieldworker must know what to expect from the...
Article
Peter Ladefoged has said that there is, “nothing more ephemeral than the sounds of a language. The sounds will live only as long as the language is spoken. When the sounds are those of elderly speakers whose children belong to another world, then soon those sounds will be gone forever. All that can remain are whatever records we have been able to a...
Article
A full-fledged history of linguistic fieldwork would be an interesting subtopic within the history of linguistics, and would also be relevant to the history of ethnography, the history of European colonization, and the history of Christian missions. Such a study, which could be conceived as a history of human curiosity about other languages, still...
Chapter
Even before fieldwork preparation (which will be dealt with in Chapter 5), it is necessary to choose a language to work on. However, the choice of language may well be out of the hands of the researcher. The language ultimately chosen for fieldwork may be suggested by an advisor or senior linguist (Section 4.1) or, due to special circumstances, a l...
Chapter
This chapter reviews the steps a fieldworker should take to successfully plan, execute and document fieldwork sessions. To ensure success, each fieldwork session needs to be well thought out. We suggest the following steps: Create a flexible plan for each session, with clear objectives and a list of planned activities or tasks Find a convenient tim...
Article
Three styles of personal names are attested for the Meithei (Tibeto-Burman, Manipur State in northeast India): a native-Meithei style, a Hindu style introduced with the eighteenth-century adoption of Hinduism by the Meithei, and a "resistance" style typified by previously unattested structures and clan names. This article shows that those who espou...
Article
In Meithei, a Tibeto-Burman language of Northeast India, the noun pí ‘grandmother’ has undergone divergent paths of semantic change, developing on the one hand into a productive nominalizer and on the other into suffixes whose meanings are derived through metonymical extensions (SMALLER VERSION, BEST EXEMPLAR, SALIENT CHARACTERISTIC, PROJECTION, IN...
Article
This study follows the approach developed in Dendrinos (1992) for EFL textbook analysis, and presents a content analysis of 11 Indian ‘Common Errors in English’ (CEIE) guidebooks to illustrate how access to English is institutionally withheld from large parts of the Indian population. The paper examines seven features: organization, quality and ext...
Chapter
This book is a collection of original essays on the practice of linguistic fieldwork and language documentation. Twelve of the leading field linguists in the world have written personal essays about the study of languages in a natural setting. Drawing on extensive research experience, they pass on the lessons they have learnt, review the techniques...

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