Shirani Widanagamage

Shirani Widanagamage
University of Ruhuna · Department of Botany

PhD, University of Queensland, Australia
Senior Lecturer, Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, University of Ruhuna, Matara, Sri Lanka

About

26
Publications
2,976
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113
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
108 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
2016201720182019202020212022010203040
Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (26)
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Pseudanabaena is a frequently found bloom-forming filamentous cyanobacteria in Sri Lankan freshwater reservoirs. Bacteria-mediated controlling measures are effective approaches to curb these nuisance blooms. During a cyanolytic process, antagonist bacteria lyse cyanobacterial cells and interfere with their normal metabolism. However, detailed studi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Maussakelle reservoir provides the main water supply to the Laxapana Hydroelectric Power Station, one of the main hydropower stations in Sri Lanka. The villagers nearby depend on this reservoir for drinking water and fishing. The presence of algal blooms in reservoirs may cause health problems as well as they can interfere with operational procedur...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cyanolytic bacteria inhabited in freshwaters play a major role in controlling cyanobacterial blooms. Disruption of photosynthesis processes, synthesis, and maintenance of photosynthetic pigments in cyanobacteria leading to death is one of the major strategies utilized by cyanolytic bacteria in controlling cyanobacterial blooms. However, the mechani...
Article
Outbreaks of cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters have been increasingly reported worldwide during the last few decades. One of the major problems with cyanobacterial blooms is that some species can be toxic. Their toxins (cyanotoxins) can have mild to serious health effects on humans and animals due to direct contact or ingestion with drinking wat...
Article
Full-text available
Following publication of the original article [1], the authors would like to remove the phrase ‘vertically transmitted’ from the last sentence in the fourth paragraph under the heading Background. The sentence originally read: In addition to serving as crop disease vectors, thrips support vertically transmitted, facultative bacterial symbionts that...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Contamination of soil with Used Lubricant oil (ULO) has become an emerging environmental threat due to possible negative impacts of ULO on different ecological receptors. Bioremediation has been considered as a green technological approach with a potential to decontaminate ULO contaminated soil. However, bioremediation efficiency and success are sp...
Article
Full-text available
Background The western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), is a globally invasive pest and plant virus vector on a wide array of food, fiber, and ornamental crops. The underlying genetic mechanisms of the processes governing thrips pest and vector biology, feeding behaviors, ecology, and insecticide resistance are largely unknown....
Article
Full-text available
Thrips palmi is a widely distributed major agricultural pest in the tropics and subtropics, causing significant losses in cucurbit and solanaceous crops through feeding damage and transmission of tospoviruses. Thrips palmi is a vector of capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) in Australia. The present understanding of transmission biology and potential ef...
Data
Sequences of oligonucleotide primers used in qPCR. (DOCX)
Article
Full-text available
Tospoviruses are among the most devastating viruses of horticultural and field crops. Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) has emerged as an important pathogen of capsicum and tomato in Australia and South-east Asia. Present knowledge about CaCV protein functions in host cells is lacking. We determined intracellular localization and interactions of CaCV...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the m...
Article
Full-text available
Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the type species of the genus Tospovirus has long been reported infecting economically important horticultural crops such as tomato, groundnut, pepper, potato and soybean, all over the world. In Sri Lanka, characteristic tospovirus symptoms such as bud necrosis, axillary shoot proliferation and ring spots were obse...
Article
Full-text available
The first complete genome sequence of capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) from Australia was determined using a combination of Illumina HiSeq RNA and Sanger sequencing technologies. Australian CaCV had a tripartite genome structure like other CaCV isolates. The large (L) RNA was 8913 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a single open reading frame...
Article
Full-text available
Papaya ( Carica papaya) is a very popular fruit crop in Sri Lanka, grown as a home garden and commercial crop for local and export markets. Papaya is commercially cultivated in Sri Lanka in about 8,000 ha with production of about 32,000 …
Article
Leek (Allium porrum) has become one of the major leafy vegetable export crops in Sri Lanka during last few years. This year-round crop is cultivated in open fields at elevations between 1,000 and 2,000 m on approximately 1,600 ha with a production of 27,000 t per year (2). In August 2009, straw-colored spots (2 to 3 mm in diameter), surrounded by a...

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Project (1)