Shinya Yamamoto

Shinya Yamamoto
Kyoto University | Kyodai

Ph.D. of Science (Kyoto University)

About

38
Publications
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Introduction
I currently work at Kyoto University, as a comparative cognitive psychologist. I'm studying the evolution of sociality and its related intelligence in humans and non-human animals, developing a two-by-two research paradigm: experiments and fieldwork with chimpanzees and bonobos. Recently I’ve been expanding this to our socially closest animals: dogs and horses, again both in captivity and in natural environment. My main research topic is the evolution of cooperative society, altruism, and understanding others. My main research places are Kumamoto Sanctuary (chimpanzees and bonobos), Wamba and Mbali/Mbalebo (DR Congo: wild bonobos), Bossou (Guinea: wild chimpanzees), horse riding clubs in Japan, Serra d’Arga (Portugal: feral horses), dog nursery in Japan, and Taiwan for free-ranging dogs.

Publications

Publications (38)
Article
Full-text available
Feral horses form relatively stable harems over time that are characterized by long-lasting bonds among their members, a characteristic that makes them an exceptional case of a social system among terrestrial ungulates. Their social system has been described as uniform despite the wide differences in their environment and demography. Horse populati...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural synchrony among individuals is essential for group-living organisms. The functioning of synchronization in a multilevel society, which is a nested assemblage of multiple social levels between many individuals, remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to build a model that explained the synchronization of activity in a m...
Preprint
Full-text available
Behavioural synchrony among individuals is essential for group-living organisms. It is still largely unknown how synchronization functions in a multilevel society, which is a nested assemblage of multiple social levels between many individuals. Our aim was to build a model that explained the synchronization of activity in a multilevel society of fe...
Article
Full-text available
The study of non-human multilevel societies can give us insights into how group-level relationships function and are maintained in a social system, but their mechanisms are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to apply spatial association data obtained from drones to verify the presence of a multilevel structure in a feral horse socie...
Article
In animal groups, individual interactions achieve coordinated movements to maintain cohesion. In horse-harem groups, herding is a behaviour in which stallions chase mares from behind; it is considered to assist with group cohesiveness. The mechanisms of the group cohesion were studied using the methods of drone filming and video tracking during her...
Article
In animal groups, individual interactions achieve coordinated movements to maintain cohesion. In horse harem groups, herding is a behavior in which males chase females from behind; it is considered to assist with group cohesiveness. However, the mechanisms by which the individuals move to maintain group cohesion are unknown. We applied novel non-in...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioural lateralisation is an effective way for animals to manage daily tasks by specialising behaviour to either side of the body. Many types of lateralisation are linked to the function of each brain hemisphere. Lateralisation of monitoring behaviour in mother–infant relationships occurs in a wide range of mammals, where infants frequently use...
Article
Full-text available
In the Abstract section, “Distribution of distance between individuals” and “Social network analysis” some typographical errors were corrected.
Article
Spatial positioning of individuals in animal groups has been studied from numerous perspectives. However, although many studies have focused on spatial position in flocks of birds and schools of fish, relatively few studies have been conducted in mammals with high accuracy. Because some mammal species form societies, we wondered how social relation...
Chapter
Food sharing has played an important role in the evolution of cooperation, especially in hominization. Evolutionary theories regarding food sharing have been based mainly on chimpanzee meat sharing. However, in bonobos, our other closest evolutionary relatives, food sharing occurs in considerably different ways than it does in chimpanzees. Bonobos...
Article
Recent studies have revealed similarities and differences among hominids: humans, chimpanzees and bonobos. Cooperation is one of the human hallmarks, but its evolutionary basis can be found both in chimpanzees and bonobos. Comparison among the three evolutionary closest relatives would tell us about how cooperative society evolved. For this purpose...
Article
Horses are phylogenetically distant from primates, but considerable behavioral links exist between the two. The sociality of horses, characterized by group stability, is similar to that of primates, but different from that of many other ungulates. Although horses and primates are good models for exploring the evolution of societies in human and non...
Article
Full-text available
Some domestic animals are thought to be skilled at social communication with humans due to the process of domestication. Horses, being in close relationship with humans, similar to dogs, might be skilled at communication with humans. Previous studies have indicated that they are sensitive to bodily signals and the attentional state of humans; howev...
Article
Empathy as a research topic is receiving increasing attention, although there seems some confusion on the definition of empathy across different fields. Frans de Waal (de Waal FBM. Putting the altruism back into altruism: the evolution of empathy. Annu Rev Psychol 2008, 59:279–300. doi:10.1146/annurev.psych.59.103006.093625) used empathy as an umbr...
Article
Full-text available
Human behavior is affected by various social cues. Studies have revealed that cues of being watched affect both social and non-social behavior. A subsequent question is whether one’s own image in a mirror has a noticeable effect on behavior and decision-making. Previous studies suggest that people behave in accordance with social desirability in th...
Article
This Special Issue of Behaviour includes twelve novel empirical papers focusing on the behaviour and cognition of both captive and wild bonobos (Pan paniscus). As our species less known closest relative, the bonobo has gone from being little studied to increasingly popular as a species of focus over the past decade. We suggest that bonobos are read...
Article
Food sharing is considered to be a driving force in the evolution of cooperation in human societies. Previously postulated hypotheses for the mechanism and evolution of food sharing, e.g., reciprocity and sharing-under-pressure, were primarily proposed on the basis of meat sharing in chimpanzees. However, food sharing in bonobos has some remarkably...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper first reviews data collected from 1976 to 2013 regarding the life histories of members of the main E1 study group of bonobos (Pan paniscus) in Wamba. The E1 group exhibited strong tendencies toward female dispersal and male residence during the entire study period, thereby exemplifying the typical characteristics of a male-philopatric an...
Article
Full-text available
Background: The evidence for culture in non-human animals has been growing incrementally over the past two decades. However, the ability for cumulative cultural evolution, with successive generations building on earlier achievements, in non-human animals remains debated. Faithful social learning of incremental improvements in technique is consider...
Data
Tool transfer upon recipient's request. In this scene in experiment 1, Mari (right booth) was in the straw-use situation and was supplied with a stick. Puchi (left booth) was in the stick-use situation and was supplied with a straw. After a human experimenter supplied a stick and a straw from the ceiling, Puchi poked her arm through the hole, and M...
Data
Close observation and subsequent switch in technique used. Pal (out of sight in the first view) closely observes the demonstrator, then fetches a tube from the floor (out of sight), and then proceeds to suck the remainder of the juice in the bottle container. Pal had just performed the “dipping” technique prior to observing the alternate technique...
Article
In the past, prosociality has been considered a hallmark of humans; however, recently, accumulating data have empirically revealed that non-human animals also show prosocial behavior. In situations in which animals cannot predict return benefits, prosocial behavior is probably driven by other-regarding motivation. A sense of fairness and empathy co...
Article
Full-text available
Humans extensively help others altruistically, which plays an important role in maintaining cooperative societies. Although some nonhuman animals are also capable of helping others altruistically, humans are considered unique in our voluntary helping and our variety of helping behaviors. Many still believe that this is because only humans can under...
Chapter
Wild chimpanzees are known to have a different repertoire of tool-use unique to each community. For example, “ant-dipping” is a tool-use behavior known in several chimpanzee communities across Africa targeted at army ants (Dorylus spp.) on the ground, whereas “ant-fishing,” which is aimed at carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.) in trees, has primarily...
Article
We investigated the evolutionary origin of other-regarding preferences, one of the strong underlying motivations for altruism, in the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes. Although altruism is expected theoretically to be kin biased and frequent in a reciprocal context, few experimental studies to date have specifically tested these hypotheses from the view...
Article
Full-text available
[This corrects the article on p. e7416 in vol. 4.].
Article
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Background: The evolution of altruism has been explained mainly from ultimate perspectives. However, it remains to be investigated from a proximate point of view how and in which situations such social propensity is achieved. We investigated chimpanzees' targeted helping in a tool transfer paradigm, and discuss the similarities and differences in...
Article
Full-text available
Chimpanzees can flexibly use tokens in cognitive tasks, but it is still unknown if they can share and/or compete over tokens as they do for food. This study aimed to evaluate the interactions spontaneously occurring between mother and offspring chimpanzees when tokens exchangeable for food were provided. Forty tokens were scattered on the floor in...
Article
Reciprocity is considered to be an explanation for altruism toward nonkin. Although there have been many theoretical studies and reciprocity is arguably prevalent in humans, little experimental work has investigated the proximate mechanism of reciprocity in nonhuman animals. The authors tested whether pairs of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) would ac...
Article
Full-text available
Humans employ various strategies, including selfish and altruistic strategies, depending on the situation. In order to examine whether non-human animals show such flexibility or not, we analyzed chimpanzees' selfish and cooperative behavior in two types of social problem situations. In this study, we tested chimpanzee mother-infant pairs in two adj...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of altruism and reciprocity has been explained mainly from ulti-mate perspectives. However, in order to understand from a proximate perspec-tive how humans evolved to be such cooperative animals, comparative studies with our evolutionary relatives are essential. Here we review several recent ex-perimental studies on chimpanzees' altru...
Article
The evolution of altruism and reciprocity has been explained mainly from ultimate perspectives. However, in order to understand from a proximate perspective how humans evolved to be such cooperative animals, comparative studies with our evolutionary relatives are essential. Here we review several recent experimental studies on chimpanzees' altruism...
Article
Wild chimpanzees are known to have a different repertoire of tool use unique to each community. For example, "ant-dipping" is a tool use behavior known in several chimpanzee communities across Africa targeted at driver ants (Dorylus spp.) on the ground, whereas "ant-fishing," which is aimed at carpenter ants (Camponotus spp.) in trees, has primaril...
Article
The present study investigated vigilance in Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in reference to some social factors. Previous studies have suggested that social factors among conspecifics should be important for vigilance in primates. This study explored the relationship between individual's social rank and vigilance in estrous and non-estrous perio...
Article
Kyoto University (京都大学) 0048 新制・課程博士 博士(理学) 甲第14452号 理博第3449号 新制/理/1503 UT51-2009-D164 2009-03-23 京都大学大学院理学研究科生物科学専攻 (主査)教授 松沢 哲郎, 准教授 友永 雅己, 准教授 田中 正之 学位規則第4条第1項該当

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