Sherman Swanson

Sherman Swanson
University of Nevada, Reno | UNR · Agriculture, Veterinary and Rangeland Science

About

31
Publications
3,017
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288
Citations
Citations since 2016
7 Research Items
189 Citations
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
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The commenter’s key argument is that Diamond Lake’s problem is strictly one of biomass, i.e., introduction of the invasive Tui Chub fish. There are a few things to note in that respect. The Tui Chub is a bait fish. It is a lower-order prey fish for higher-order trout/salmonid species. Tui Chub is zooplanktivorous. Since the Tui Chub feed on zooplan...
Article
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Effective stream and wetland Best Management Practices (BMPs) restore the physical processes associated with ecological functions to their Proper Functioning Condition (PFC, i.e., the highest attainable ecological status of a riparian area without consideration of economic, administrative, or social constraints). Ecological functions connect stream...
Article
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The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) uses Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) calculations, and the associated regulatory process, to manage harmful cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) attributable to non-point source (NPS) pollution. TMDLs are based on response (lagging) indicators (e.g., measurable quantities of NPS (nutrients: nitroge...
Article
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• Over 400,000 km² of the Intermountain West is colonized by cheatgrass and other annual grasses.• Planning and management actions designed to foster perennial grass health throughout the region have never addressed how annual grasses would respond.• For decades, the most significant landscape-level management approach toward invasive annual grasse...
Article
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Fire kills Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) and promotes cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), a highly flammable and invasive annual in sagebrush communities with compromised resistance. To focus management on resistance and resilience of Wyoming big sagebrush communities with varying species compositi...
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Many Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis) communities are invaded by exotic annuals, especially cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), promoting larger and more frequent wildfires. Mowing sagebrush can reduce fire risk. To identify community features favoring regeneration of native perennials over exotic annuals, we compar...
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Stream and wetland riparian areas are able to sustain a state of resiliency based on the ecosystem’s ability to attain the functions of its ecological potential. This resiliency allows an area to provide and produce desired and valued water quality and aquatic habitat ecosystem services. Maintaining healthy aquatic and riparian habitats depends on...
Article
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Cattle grazed a cheatgrass-dominated pasture during the fall dormant period for four years (2006-2009) and were provided a protein nutrient supplement to improve their distribution, uptake of dry feed and production performance. Cheatgrass standing crop was reduced by 43 percent to 80 percent each year, and cattle weight and body condition score in...
Article
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Wildfire is a major concern in the Intermountain West. Fuels management can lower the potential for negative wildfire effects. Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), a nonnative annual grass, invasion has resulted in a buildup of highly flammable fine fuels that promote frequent wildfire. Removal of cheatgrass standing crop through targeted, prescriptive...
Article
Prioritizing total maximum daily load (TMDL) development starts by considering the scope and severity of water pollution and risks to public health and aquatic life. Methodology using quantitative assessments of in-stream water quality is appropriate and effective for point source (PS) dominated discharge, but less so in watersheds with mostly nonp...
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In a previous article, Beschta et al. (Environ Manag 51(2):474-491, 2013) argue that grazing by large ungulates (both native and domestic) should be eliminated or greatly reduced on western public lands to reduce potential climate change impacts. The authors did not present a balanced synthesis of the scientific literature, and their publication is...
Article
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Since 1961, The Nevada Youth Range Camp (NYRC) has provided a week-long camping and instructional experience for high school-age youth from across Nevada and occasionally Northeastern California. Nevada Youth Range Camp goals focus on relationships between people and rangeland. Campers learn that land managers need information about plants, wildlif...
Article
Until recently, most contemporary ecologists have ignored or diminished anecdotal historical accounts and anthropologists' reports about aboriginal fire in the Great Basin. Literature review shows that Indians practiced regular use of fire for many purposes, including the obvious reasons of increasing the availability of desired plants, maintaining...
Article
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In 1999—2001 wildfires burned 1.13 million ha across northern Nevada, burning through many grazed riparian areas. With increases in wildfire frequency and extent predicted throughout the Great Basin, an understanding of the interactive effects of wildfire, livestock grazing, and natural hydrologic characteristics is critical. A comparison of pre- a...
Article
In the Great Basin, frequency of large-fire is increasing. To better understand fire and riparian system interactions, we studied pre- to post-fire changes in ten riparian attributes of a randomly sampled reach of forty three streams burned within a three-year period. Post-fire data were collected four to six relatively dry years after late-summer...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Cooperative permittee monitoring (CPM) is embraced by US Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management at the national level and the livestock industry at the organizational level through the Public Lands Council. Memorandums of Understanding between these federal agencies and the Public Lands Council provide the basis for developing and implementin...
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The SRM conducted the 'Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts' conference and workshops in Reno, Nevada, in partnership with 26 other organizations in December 2008. Participants who benefited from this 2.5-day event included 309 registrants representing 17 states and 77 different universities, federal and state agencies, tribal agencies...
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The panel discussion 'Overcoming Obstacles to Fuels Management at the Landscape Scale,' at Workshop IV addressed questions about Restore New Mexico and woodland expansion. The workshop was moderated by Brad Washa, Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Jason Davison of the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension spoke about a 'Case Study of the Murphy...
Article
Since the mid-1980s, sagebrush rangelands in the Great Basin of the United States have experienced more frequent and larger wildfires. These fires affect livestock forage, the sagebrush/grasses/forbs mosaic that is important for many wildlife species (e.g., the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)), post-fire flammability and fire freque...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
For almost four years, the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension has led a team of educators, combining science and common sense to teach a " Range Management School " (RMS) curriculum to agricultural producers and land managers across rural Nevada. Other teaching partners include the Bureau `and the Nevada ranching industry. The curriculum in...
Article
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The state of Nevada initiated a statewide planning process for sage-grouse in August 2000. The initial planning team of 28 members developed a conservation strategy focused around the development of six local (but multi-county) conservation plans that would be merged into one statewide plan. The development of the local plans began in November 2001...
Article
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Since settlement by Euro-Americans, many changes have occurred on the Great Basin landscape. Examining land-use in the context of history provides a reference point for land managers. An increasing number of scientists and bioregional historians have recently indicated that active vegetation management of landscapes, particularly where wildland fir...
Article
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It is obvious that the diverse array of wildlife species using sagebrush habitats has a similarly wide range of habitat requirements. Vegetation management for biological diversity on a landscape scale should take these diverse habitat requirements into consideration. Management for any one species may or may not provide the habitat requirements fo...
Article
Full-text available
It is obvious that the diverse array of wildlife species using sagebrush habitats have a similarly wide range of habitat requirements. Vegetation management for biological diversity (“biodiversity”) on a landscape scale should take these diverse habitat requirements into consideration. Management for any one species may or may not provide the habit...

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