Sharon E Kessler

Sharon E Kessler
University of Stirling · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

42
Publications
3,725
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244
Citations
Additional affiliations
May 2014 - April 2015
McGill University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (42)
Article
Full-text available
Mammalian captive dietary specialists like folivores are prone to gastrointestinal distress and primate dietary specialists suffer the greatest gut microbiome diversity losses in captivity compared to the wild. Marmosets represent another group of dietary specialists, exudivores that eat plant exudates, but whose microbiome remains relatively less...
Article
Full-text available
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed an urgent need for a comprehensive, multidisciplinary understanding of how healthcare systems respond successfully to infectious pathogens –and how they fail. This paper contributes a novel perspective that focuses on the selective pressures that shape healthcare systems over evolutionary time. We use a comparativ...
Article
Full-text available
The media is a powerful force that can affect the welfare of the domiciled dog population. Dogs have long been in human stories and their depictions can create demand for the breeds shown. While previous research has found that this effect can last for up to ten years after the release of a movie, how this phenomenon occurs is unknown. This paper e...
Article
Full-text available
Female primates signal impending ovulation with a suite of sexual signals. Studies of these signals have focussed on visual, and to a lesser extent, acoustic signals, neglecting olfactory signals. We aimed to investigate the information content of female olfactory signals in captive olive baboons ( Papio anubis ) and relate these to the female fert...
Article
Eight species of ectoparasites were collected during 225 gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus (J. F. Miller), captures, in Ankarafantsika National Park, Madagascar, in 2010-2011. The ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis lemuris Hoogstraal, was the most common ectoparasite and was mostly represented by nymphs. Other ectoparasites recorded include the polyplac...
Article
Full-text available
Acoustic phenotypic variation is of major importance for speciation and the evolution of species diversity. Whereas selective and stochastic forces shaping the acoustic divergence of signaling systems are well studied in insects, frogs, and birds, knowledge on the processes driving acoustic phenotypic evolution in mammals is limited. We quantified...
Article
Members of the sucking louse genus Pedicinus are ectoparasites of cercopithecid primates in Africa, Asia, and Gibraltar. Pedicinus gabonensis n. sp. is described based on adult male and female specimens collected from the mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) in Gabon. The new species is compared morphologically with other members of the genus Pedicinus, an...
Article
Full-text available
One of the striking features of human social complexity is that we provide care to sick and contagious individuals, rather than avoiding them. Care-giving is a powerful strategy of disease control in human populations today; however, we are not the only species which provides care for the sick. Widespread reports occurring in distantly related spec...
Article
Full-text available
A new chigger mite species, Schoutedenichia microcebi n. sp. is described from the grey mouse lemur Microcebus murinus (J.F. Miller) from Madagascar. The new species is closely related to S. dutoiti (Radford, 1948), a species described from a single specimen collected on a rodent in South Africa. Examination of the holotype and new material on S. d...
Preprint
Microbiome studies show that host taxon, diet, and environment influence gut bacteria. However, these factors are rarely studied in animal hybrids and exudivores (which nutritionally exploit indigestible oligosaccharides). To investigate the effects of host taxon, hybridization, and environment on gut microbiota, we conducted 16S V4 ribosomal seque...
Article
Full-text available
Frequent kin-biased coalitionary behaviour is a hallmark of mammalian social complexity. Furthermore, selection to understand complex social dynamics is believed to underlie the co-evolution of social complexity and large brains. Vocalisations have been shown to be an important mechanism with which large-brained mammals living in complex social gro...
Article
Full-text available
Humans are the only species to have evolved cooperative care-giving as a strategy for disease control. A synthesis of evidence from the fossil record, paleogenomics, human ecology, and disease transmission models, suggests that care-giving for the diseased evolved as part of the unique suite of cognitive and socio-cultural specializations that are...
Article
Lemurpediculus madagascariensis sp. nov. (Phthiraptera: Anoplura: Polyplacidae) is described from the Gray Mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus (J. F. Miller) (Primates: Cheirogaleidae), from Ankarafantsika National Park, Madagascar. Lemurs were trapped using Sherman Live Traps and visually inspected for lice, which were preserved in 90% ethanol. Adults...
Article
The emergence of providing care to diseased conspecifics must have been a turning point during the evolution of hominin sociality. On a population level, care may have minimized the costs of socially transmitted diseases at a time of increasing social complexity, although individual care-givers probably incurred increased transmission risks. We pro...
Chapter
Capture–recapture techniques have contributed greatly to primatology. This entry provides an overview of how researchers conduct capture–recapture studies of primates, what data can be collected, and what can be learned from that data. Capture–recapture studies enable researchers to study the distribution and movement of individuals throughout a ha...
Article
Full-text available
Social complexity is argued to be a driving factor in the evolution of communicative complexity. Complex social systems require individuals to form relationships with many conspecifics and interact in a wide variety of contexts over time, thus selecting for acoustic communication systems complex enough to facilitate these relationships. To better u...
Article
Full-text available
Many factors can influence the parasite load of animal hosts, but integrative studies that simultaneously investigate several factors are still rare in many taxonomic groups. This study investigates the influence of host species, host population density, parasite transmission mode, sex, and two temporal (month, year) factors on gastrointestinal par...
Conference Paper
Though matriline-based social complexity is widespread across mammals and believed to be a product of kin selection, exactly how this evolved is unknown. The transition from the ancestral mammalian state of asociality to group-living is thought to have occurred through solitary foraging, in which animals forage alone, but maintain a social network...
Conference Paper
Kin selection is a driving force in the evolution of mammalian social complexity and requires that kin are distinctive from nonkin. The transition from the ancestral state of asociality to the derived state of complex social groups is thought to have occurred via solitary foraging, in which individuals forage alone, but, unlike the asocial ancestor...
Article
Full-text available
Maternal kin selection is a driving force in the evolution of mammalian social complexity and it requires that kin are distinctive from nonkin. The transition from the ancestral state of asociality to the derived state of complex social groups is thought to have occurred via solitary foraging, in which individuals forage alone, but, unlike the asoc...
Conference Paper
Social complexity is argued to be a driving factor in the evolution of communicative complexity. Complex social systems require individuals to form relationships with many individuals and interact in a wide variety of contexts over time, thus selecting for acoustic communication systems complex enough to facilitate these relationships. However, the...
Article
Full-text available
Background Kin selection is a driving force in the evolution of mammalian social complexity. Recognition of paternal kin using vocalizations occurs in taxa with cohesive, complex social groups. This is the first investigation of paternal kin recognition via vocalizations in a small-brained, solitary foraging mammal, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus...
Conference Paper
Paternal kin recognition can facilitate inbreeding avoidance and kin selection, but how such recognition evolves is not well understood. We aimed to conduct the first investigation of how paternal kinship is conveyed and recognized in the communication calls of a nongregarious nocturnal primate with a dispersed social system, the grey mouse lemur (...
Conference Paper
Students frequently question the relevance of science lessons to complex, “real world” issues. As a graduate fellow working with fifth and sixth grade science students in Lowell Elementary School in Phoenix, Arizona, I have found that incorporating lessons about my field research on wild primates has been an effective way to engage students. Studen...
Article
Full-text available
This is the first detailed analysis of allonursing in a galago, a relatively nongregarious African strepsirrhine. Existing data on allonursing in galagos are scarce due to the difficulties of observing wild infant behavior in nocturnal species that frequently raise young in nests, and to the rarity of colonies with multiple co-housed lactating fema...

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