Shaopeng Li

Shaopeng Li
East China Normal University | ECNU · School of Ecological and Environmental Sciences

PhD

About

41
Publications
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883
Citations

Publications

Publications (41)
Article
Full-text available
Darwin's naturalisation conundrum describes the paradox that the relatedness of exotic species to native residents could either promote or hinder their success through opposing mechanisms: niche pre-adaptation or competitive interactions. Previous studies focusing on single snapshots of invasion patterns have provided support to both sides of the c...
Article
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Whether plant communities in a given region converge towards a particular stable state during succession has long been debated, but rarely tested at a sufficiently long time scale. By analysing a 50-year continuous study of post-agricultural secondary succession in New Jersey, USA, we show that the extent of community convergence varies with the sp...
Article
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There is increasing awareness of invasion in microbial communities worldwide, but the mechanisms behind microbial invasions remain poorly understood. Specifically, we know little about how the evolutionary and ecological differences between invaders and natives regulate invasion success and impact. Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis suggests that t...
Article
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Microbes, similar to plants and animals, exhibit biogeographic patterns. However, in contrast with the considerable knowledge on the island biogeography of higher organisms, we know little about the distribution of microorganisms within and among islands. Here, we explored insular soil bacterial and fungal biogeography and underlying mechanisms, us...
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Elton's biotic resistance hypothesis, which posits that diverse communities should be more resistant to biological invasions, has received considerable experimental support. However, it remains unclear whether such a negative diversity–invasibility relationship would persist under anthropogenic environmental change. By using the common ragweed (Amb...
Article
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Since Darwin’s time, degree of ecological similarity between exotic and native species has been assumed to affect the establishment success or failure of exotic species. However, a direct test of the effect of exotic‐native similarity on establishment of exotics is scarce because of the difficulty in recognizing failures of species to establish in...
Article
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Purpose Nitrogen (N) deposition and increased precipitation were widely reported to promote plant productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. However, few studies have explored the effects of historical resource supplements on plant communities (legacy effects). Methods Based on a field experiment, we examined the legacy effects of N deposition and in...
Article
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Species mean trait values are the common currency of current trait-based community ecology, in which species are approximated by a set of constant mean trait values and are assumed to be passively selected by abiotic and biotic filters according to these values. However, species mean trait values can respond to both species interactions and the env...
Article
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It has been increasingly recognized that plant traits and their intraspecific variation play pivotal roles in determining how ecosystem structure and function respond to a changing environment. Yet, it remains unclear how and which plant traits regulate the assembly process and thus affect ecosystem structure and function under climate changes. Her...
Article
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Aim Biological invasions threaten biodiversity globally. Large‐scale studies of non‐native plant species invasiveness typically focus on identifying ecological differences between naturalized and invasive species that account for their spread from sites of initial establishment (i.e., invasion success). However, invasive species differ widely in th...
Article
Soil microbes play critical roles in re-establishing plant diversity and ecosystem functioning after disturbance events. However, the influence of deterministic and stochastic processes in shaping microbial community assembly during long-term ecosystem recovery are poorly understood. We characterized soil prokaryotic and fungal communities along tw...
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The niche dimension hypothesis predicts that more species can coexist given a greater number of niche axes along which they partition the environment. Although this hypothesis has been broadly supported by nutrient enrichment experiments, its applicability to other ecological factors, such as natural enemies and abiotic stresses, has not been vigor...
Article
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Climate change is known to affect many facets of the Earth's ecosystems. However, little is known about its impacts on phylogenetic and functional properties of ecological communities. Here we studied the responses of plant communities in an alpine grassland on the Tibetan Plateau to environmental warming across taxonomic, phylogenetic and function...
Article
The study of islands has made substantial contributions to the development of evolutionary and ecological theory. However, we know little about microbial community assembly on islands. Using soil microbial data collected from 29 lake islands and nearby mainland, we examined the assembly mechanisms of soil bacterial and fungal communities among and...
Article
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Plant community may provide products and services to humans. However, patterns and drivers of community stability along a precipitation gradient remain unclear. A regional‐scale transect survey was conducted over a 3‐year period from 2013 to 2015, along a precipitation gradient from 275 to 555 mm and spanning 440 km in length from west to east in a...
Article
1. Anthropogenic environmental changes are known to affect the Earth's ecosystems. However, how these changes influence assembly trajectories of the impacted communities remains a largely open question. 2. In this study, we investigated the effect of elevated nitrogen (N) deposition and increased precipitation on plant taxonomic and phylogenetic β...
Article
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Winter snowfall is an important water source for plants during summer in semiarid regions. Snow, rain, soil water, and plant water were sampled for hydrogen and oxygen stable isotopes analyses under control and increased snowfall conditions in the temperate steppe of Inner Mongolia, China. Our study showed that the snowfall contribution to plant wa...
Article
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The nitrogen (N) cycle in terrestrial ecosystems is strongly influenced by resorption before litter fall and by mineralization after litter fall. Although both resorption and mineralization make N available to plants and are influenced by climate, their linkage in a changing environment remains largely unknown. Here, our synthesis study shows that,...
Article
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The response of plant diversity to increased snowfall, i.e., precipitation that falls in a solid state rather than a liquid state, is unclear. We investigated the potential effects of 12 year snowfall augmentation on species richness using coordinated distributed experiments, including ten sites across a rainfall gradient of 211–354 mm and spanning...
Article
1.A central aim of invasion biology has been to identify key functional differences between native and exotic species to determine which traits may be responsible for invasion success and impacts. There are two primary ways that differences may exist between native and exotic species ‐ the traits of the local species pools may differ, or the way th...
Article
Predicting which nonnative species become invasive is critical for their successful management, and Charles Darwin provided predictions based on species' relatedness. However, Darwin provided two opposing predictions about the relatedness of introduced nonnatives to indigenous species. First, environmental fit is the dominant factor determining inv...
Article
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Although much research has explored changes in ecosystem functions associated with global environmental changes, the mechanistic pathways behind the observed changes remain poorly understood. 2.Using an 11-year experiment that increased growing season precipitation and nitrogen deposition in a temperate steppe, we explored the relative importance o...
Article
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Understanding the origins and introduction pathways of invasive species is a fundamental issue for invasion biology, which is necessary for predicting and preventing future invasion. Once an invasive species is established in a new location, this location could serve as a stepping-stone for further invasions. However, such “stepping-stone” effect h...
Article
Darwin's naturalization hypothesis (DNH), which predicts that alien species more distantly related to native communities are more likely to naturalize, has received much recent attention. The mixed findings from empirical studies that have tested DNH, however, seem to defy generalizations. Using meta-analysis to synthesize results of existing studi...
Article
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Ecological communities often transition from phylogenetic and functional clustering to overdispersion over succession as judged by space-for-time substitution studies. Such a pattern has been generally attributed to the increase in competitive exclusion of closely related species with similar traits through time, although colonisation and extinctio...
Data
Full-text available
Ecological communities often transition from phylogenetic and functional clustering to overdispersion over succession as judged by space-for-time substitution studies. Such a pattern has been generally attributed to the increase in competitive exclusion of closely related species with similar traits through time, although colonisation and extinctio...
Article
Full-text available
1.Identifying the factors determining the success of invasive species is critical for management of biological invasions. Darwin's naturalization conundrum states that exotic species closely related to natives should be successful because of a shared affinity for local environmental conditions, but at the same time close relatives often compete mor...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Darwin’s naturalization conundrum states that invader species closely related to natives should be successful because of a shared affinity for local environmental conditions, but that close relatives often compete the most, limiting niche opportunities for the invaders. Previous studies have generally considered these tw...
Article
Full-text available
1. An important factor limiting the wider application of constructed ecosystems for bioremediation of sites contaminated by toxic chemicals is their relatively low efficiency of contaminant removal. Although there is growing evidence that species-rich ecosystems may out-perform species-poor ecosystems in removing excessive nutrients from water thro...
Article
Full-text available
Naturalization (the establishment of a self-sustaining population for at least a decade) is a fundamental precondition for plant invasion and so compiling a complete inventory of naturalized alien species is necessary for predicting and hence preventing such invasion. However, nationwide information on naturalized plants in China is still lacking....
Data
Appendix S2. The proportion of naturalized plant species per family (for families with more than five naturalized plant species): total naturalized species compared between China and the average of 26 naturalized floras for elsewhere in the world determined by Pyšek
Data
Appendix S1. Supplementary information regarding list of the naturalized alien plants in China. This file contains the names, geographic origins, life forms of the naturalized plants, and references are also attached.
Article
1. Human activities are greatly changing the conditions of ecosystems. One of these major changes is that more and more ecosystems are facing increasing concentrations of highly toxic heavy metals like cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg). Previous studies have shown this type of pollution may be associated with the loss of biodiversity, leavin...

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