Shannon M. Hennessey

Shannon M. Hennessey
Arizona State University | ASU · Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science and School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning

PhD

About

17
Publications
2,385
Reads
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210
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Full-text available
The incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) has increased in wildlife populations in recent years and is expected to continue to increase with global environmental change. Marine diseases are relatively understudied compared to terrestrial diseases but warrant parallel attention as they can disrupt ecosystems, cause economic loss, and thre...
Preprint
Full-text available
The incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) has increased in wildlife populations in recent years and is expected to continue to increase with global change. Marine diseases in particular are relatively understudied compared to terrestrial disease, but they can disrupt ecosystem resilience, cause economic loss, or threaten human health. Wh...
Preprint
The incidence of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) has increased in wildlife populations in recent years and is expected to continue to increase with global change. Marine diseases in particular are relatively understudied compared to terrestrial disease, but they can disrupt ecosystem resilience, cause economic loss, or threaten human health. Wh...
Article
Increased recognition of the need for ecosystem-based management has resulted in a growing body of research on the use of indicators to represent and track ecosystem status, particularly in marine environments. While multiple frameworks have been developed for selecting and evaluating indicators, certain types of indicators require additional consi...
Article
Full-text available
Despite evidence that mobile bottom fishing gear causes physical damage to habitat-forming organisms on the seafloor, likely indirectly affecting associated fishes, it is difficult to determine how conservation and management policies influence such effects because researchers do not typically systematically quantify the extent and intensity of gea...
Article
Full-text available
The oceans are changing more rapidly than ever before. Unprecedented climatic variability is interacting with unmistakable long-term trends, all against a backdrop of intensifying human activities. What remains unclear, however, is how to evaluate whether conditions have changed sufficiently to pro- voke major responses of species, habitats, and co...
Article
Full-text available
One of the twenty-first century's greatest environmental challenges is to recover and restore species, habitats and ecosystems. The decision about how to initiate restoration is best-informed by an understanding of the linkages between ecosystem components and, given these linkages, an appreciation of the consequences of choosing to recover one eco...
Article
Full-text available
Despite decades of work in environmental science and ecology, estimating human influences on ecosystems remains challenging. This is partly due to complex chains of causation among ecosystem elements, exacerbated by the difficulty of collecting biological data at sufficient spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. Here, we demonstrate the utility o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite decades of work in environmental science and ecology, estimating human influences on ecosystems remains challenging. This is partly due to complex chains of causation among ecosystem elements, exacerbated by the difficulty of collecting biological data at sufficient spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. Here, we demonstrate the utility o...
Preprint
Full-text available
Despite decades of work in environmental science and ecology, estimating human influences on ecosystems remains challenging. This is partly due to complex chains of causation among ecosystem elements, exacerbated by the difficulty of collecting biological data at sufficient spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. Here, we demonstrate the utility o...
Article
Full-text available
Low dissolved oxygen (DO), or hypoxia, has emerged as a key threat to marine and estuarine ecosystems worldwide. While deep, offshore severe hypoxia (<2 mg l(-1)) can cause mortality, the non-lethal impact of lower DO on the shallow nearshore (<= 30 m) community is not well understood, despite the importance of the habitat for numerous species. We...
Article
Low dissolved oxygen (DO), or hypoxia, has emerged as a key threat to marine and estuarine ecosystems worldwide. While the deep, offshore severe hypoxia (<2mg L-1) can cause mortality, the non-lethal impact of lower DO on the shallow nearshore (≤30m) community is not well understood, despite the importance of the habitat for numerous species. We ev...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Hypoxia [dissolved oxygen (DO) < 2 mg L-1] has emerged as a key threat to marine and estuarine ecosystems around the world. While organisms may suffer direct mortality, mobile species can display patterns of avoidance away from the deep, offshore hypoxia-impacted waters. However, the non-lethal impact of low DO conditi...

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