Shanley Allen

Shanley Allen
Technische Universität Kaiserslautern | TUK · Psycholinguistics and Language Development Group, Department of Social Sciences

PhD, McGill University

About

95
Publications
20,059
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,683
Citations

Publications

Publications (95)
Article
Full-text available
Previous cross-linguistic studies have shown that object relative clauses (ORCs) are typically harder to parse than subject relative clauses (SRCs). The cause of difficulty, however, is still under debate, both in the adult and in the developmental literature. The present study investigates the on-line processing of SRCs and ORCs in Greek-speaking...
Article
Full-text available
Caretakers tend to repeat themselves when speaking to children, either to clarify their message or to redirect wandering attention. This repetition also appears to support language learning. For example, words that are heard more frequently tend to be produced earlier by young children. However, pure repetition only goes so far; some variation betw...
Article
Full-text available
We argue for a perspective on bilingual heritage speakers as native speakers of both their languages and present results from a large-scale, cross-linguistic study that took such a perspective and approached bilinguals and monolinguals on equal grounds. We targeted comparable language use in bilingual and monolingual speakers, crucially covering br...
Article
The manuscript provides readers with a basic methodological toolset for experimental psycholinguistic studies on translation. Following a description of key methodological concepts and the rationale behind experimental designs in psycholinguistics, we discuss experimental paradigms adopted from bilingualism research, which potentially constitute a...
Article
In the current study we used the gaze-contingent moving window paradigm to directly compare the second language (L2) English perceptual span of two groups that speak languages with essentially the same lexicon and grammar but crucially with different writing directions (and scripts): Hindi (read left to right) and Urdu (read right to left). This is...
Article
Full-text available
The category “native speaker” is flawed because it fails to consider the diversity between the speaker groups falling under its scope, as highlighted in previous literature. This paper provides further evidence by focusing on the similarities and differences between heritage speakers (HSs) and monolingually-raised speakers (MSs) of their heritage a...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we investigated parafoveal processing by L1 and late L2 speakers of English (L1 German) while reading in English. We hypothesized that L2ers would make use of semantic and orthographic information parafoveally . Using the gaze contingent boundary paradigm, we manipulated six parafoveal masks in a sentence ( Mark found th*e wood for th...
Article
In two visual world experiments we disentangled the influence of order of mention (first vs. second mention), grammatical role (subject vs object), and semantic role (proto-agent vs proto-patient) on 7- to 10-year-olds’ real-time interpretation of German pronouns. Children listened to SVO or OVS sentences containing active accusative verbs ( küssen...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster focuses on referent introduction of heritage speakers and monolinguals.
Presentation
Full-text available
This presentation focuses on the usage of three clause types (independent main clauses, coordinate main clauses, and subordinate clause) in various registers by heritage speakers of German in the USA.
Article
Full-text available
Much reading research has found that informative parafoveal masks lead to a reading benefit for native speakers (see, Schotter et al., 2012). However, little reading research has tested the impact of uninformative parafoveal masks during reading. Additionally, parafoveal processing research is primarily restricted to native speakers. In the current...
Article
Full-text available
Research has shown that suprasegmental cues in conjunction with visual context can lead to anticipatory (or predictive) eye movements. However, the impact of speech rate on anticipatory eye movements has received little empirical attention. The purpose of the current study was twofold. From a methodological perspective, we tested the impact of spee...
Chapter
The role of text characteristics like information density for the comprehension and future retrieval of academic texts is far from understood. For instance, complex concepts can be summarized in a concise but ambiguous way using complex nominal compounds or explained in more detail using propositions detailing the precise relationship between the c...
Article
Full-text available
How does a child map words to grammatical categories when words are not overtly marked either lexically or prosodically? Recent language acquisition theories have proposed that distributional information encoded in sequences of words or morphemes might play a central role in forming grammatical classes. To test this proposal, we analyze child-direc...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this study, we started to investigate the impact of different layouts in scientific papers using eye tracking technology. At this step, we constrict our study to have a comparison between layout formats inside Computer Science Community. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) proceeding as the double-column format and Springer Lecture Notes i...
Article
In two cross-linguistic priming experiments with native German speakers of L2 English, we investigated the role of constituent order and level of embedding in cross-linguistic structural priming. In both experiments, significant priming effects emerged only if prime and target were similar with regard to constituent order and also situated on the s...
Article
Although virtually all Inuit children in eastern Arctic Canada learn Inuktitut as their native language, there is a critical lack of tools to assess their level of language ability. This article investigates how mean length of utterance (MLU), a widely-used assessment measure in English and other languages, can be best applied in Inuktitut. The aut...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews the literature on preschool children’s sensitivity to cognitive accessibility in selecting linguistic forms to realize referents in speech. Both spontaneous speech and experimental production studies are reviewed, encompassing thirteen languages for monolingual children and five different language pairs for bilingual children....
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT The acquisition of systematic patterns and exceptions in different languages can be readily examined using the causative construction. Persian allows four types of causative structures, including one productive multiword structure (i.e. the light verb construction). In this study, we examine the development of all four structures in Persia...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews the literature on preschool children’s sensitivity to cognitive accessibility in selecting linguistic forms to realize referents in speech. Both spontaneous speech and experimental production studies are reviewed, encompassing thirteen languages for monolingual children and five different language pairs for bilingual children....
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has demonstrated that children as young as 2;0 are sensitive to discourse-pragmatic context when selecting referring expressions. If a referent is present in the discourse context and/or jointly attended to by the listener, a child will be more likely to omit a referring expression or use a pronominal form. To date, most research...
Article
New referents are typically introduced into adult discourse with lexical nouns. This makes new referents maximally clear for listeners, and helps the listeners direct their attention appropriately. A different trend is observed in child language, where new referents may be realised with demonstratives or pronouns, or they may be omitted altogether....
Article
Full-text available
Previous research has shown that children attend to discourse-pragmatics (e.g. newness, joint attention) when they produce referential forms in both languages that permit subject omission and those that do not. However, studies in languages that do not permit subject omission have been limited to only one or two discourse-pragmatic features, biling...
Chapter
One potential challenge for children learning Inuktitut comes from the ergative case marking system, because of the contrast between the ergative system in morphology and the accusative system governing syntax. However, no studies have yet been published focusing on how Inuktitut-speaking children acquire ergativity. In this chapter, we investigate...
Article
Full-text available
The way adults express manner and path components of a motion event varies across typologically different languages both in speech and cospeech gestures, showing that language specificity in event encoding influences gesture. The authors tracked when and how this multimodal cross-linguistic variation develops in children learning Turkish and Englis...
Article
Gestures that accompany speech are known to be tightly coupled with speech production. However little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie this link. Previous cross-linguistic research has provided preliminary evidence for online interaction between the two systems based on the systematic co-variation found between how different lan...
Article
Full-text available
Inuktitut, the Eskimo language spoken in Eastern Canada, is one of the few Canadian indigenous languages with a strong chance of long-term survival because over 90% of Inuit children still learn Inuktitut from birth. In this paper I review existing literature on bilingual Inuit children to explore the prospects for the survival of Inuktitut given t...
Article
Different languages map semantic elements of spatial relations onto different lexical and syntactic units. These crosslinguistic differences raise important questions for language development in terms of how this variation is learned by children. We investigated how Turkish-, English-, and Japanese-speaking children (mean age 3;8) package the seman...
Article
Full-text available
Children who are native speakers of minority languages often experience stagnation or decline in that language when exposed to a majority language in a school or community situation. This paper examines such a situation among the Inuit of arctic Quebec. All 18 participants in the study were native speakers of Inuktitut, living in home environments...
Presentation
Full-text available
A presentation on language acquisition in Inuktitut-English bilinguals.
Article
Full-text available
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
Full-text available
What are the relations between linguistic encoding and gestural representations of events during online speaking? The few studies that have been conducted on this topic have yielded somewhat incompatible results with regard to whether and how gestural representations of events change with differences in the preferred semantic and syntactic encoding...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates subject omission in six English-Inuktitut simultaneous bilingual children, aged 1;8-3;9, to examine whether there are cross-language influences in their language development. Previous research with other language pairs has shown that the morphosyntax of one language can influence the development of morphosyntax in the other...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We examined the development of linguistic and gestural expressions of direct causation (where a direct relation exists between the causer and the causee) in motion events in two typologically different languages. 120 American and Turkish adults and children (aged 3, 5 and 9) narrated clips of direct causation. Linguistic descriptions of causal even...
Article
Full-text available
In his review of Crain & Thornton's (C&T) (1998) Investigations in Universal Grammar (IUG), Drozd raises many substantial concerns that call into question the correctness and usefulness of the Modularity Matching Model, and the adequacy of the experimental designs put forth to support it. My comments will focus on Modularity Matching. First, I elab...
Article
Full-text available
KARMILOFF, K. & KARMILOFF-SMITH, A., Pathways to language: from fetus to adolescent. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001. Pp. ix+256. - Volume 30 Issue 1 - SHANLEY E. M. ALLEN
Article
Full-text available
L'inuktitut est une langue eskimo-aleut parlee dans les parties nord-est du Canada. L'A. presente des donnees empiriques de cette langue inuit du Quebec arctique, pour mettre en valeur l'usage conversationnel des structures verbales elliptiques dans lesquelles il manque la base verbale. Ces structures elliptiques consistent seulement en une base po...
Article
Full-text available
The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
Article
Full-text available
The importance of discourse-pragmatics in acquisition - Volume 4 Issue 1 - Shanley Allen
Article
Full-text available
A stage of optional infinitive (OI) production has been identified in typically devel-oping (TD) children learning languages that do not permit null subjects (Wexler (1994; 1998; 1999)), and this stage has been shown to be extended in at least Eng-lish-and German-speaking children with specific language impairment (SLI; Rice, Noll, and Grimm (1997)...
Article
Full-text available
This paper assesses discourse pragmatics as a potential explanation for the production and omission of arguments in early child language. It employs a set of features that characterize typical situations of informativeness (Greenfield and Smith 1976; Clancy 1993, 1997) to examine argument status in data from four children aged 2;0 through 3;6 learn...
Article
Full-text available
Parents in communities experiencing rapid language and culture change face particular discourse issues as they construct their homes' language and culture. This article discusses particular language decisions and influences faced by families from two Inuit communities in Arctic Quebec. In most homes, there were fluid boundaries with no conscious st...
Article
Full-text available
How children learn the category "verb" as a grammatical construct has been the focus of much research over the past two decades. However, less attention has been paid to acquisition of smaller categories within the verb category. This paper uses data concerning the acquisition of causatives in Imtktitut to address the question of how smaller catego...
Book
This book discusses the first language acquisition of three morphosyntactic mechanisms of transitivity alternation in arctic Quebec Inuktitut. Data derive from naturalistic longitudinal spontaneous speech samples collected over a nine-month period from four Inuit children. Both basic and advanced forms of passive structures are shown to be used pro...
Article
Full-text available
Passive structures are typically assumed to be one of the later acquired constructions in child language. English-speaking children have been shown to produce and comprehend their first simple passive structures productively by about age four and to master more complex structures by about age nine. Recent crosslinguistic data have shown that this p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available