Shane Lishawa

Shane Lishawa
Loyola University Chicago | LUC · Institute of Environmental Sustainability

About

26
Publications
6,511
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595
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2007 - November 2016
Loyola University Chicago
Position
  • Research Associate

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
Detecting newly established invasive plants is key to prevent further spread. Traditional field surveys are challenging and often insufficient to identify the presence and extent of invasions. This is particularly true for wetland ecosystems because of difficult access, and because floating and submergent plants may go undetected in the understory...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive species management typically aims to promote diversity and wildlife habitat, but little is known about how management techniques affect wetland carbon (C) dynamics. Since wetland C uptake is largely influenced by water levels and highly productive plants, the interplay of hydrologic extremes and invasive species is fundamental to understan...
Article
The conservation of many freshwater marsh waterbirds (i.e., waterfowl, shorebirds, wading birds, and secretive marshbirds) in the Laurentian Great Lakes requires managing invasive emergent macrophytes, which degrade waterbird habitat by creating dense, litter‐clogged stands, and excluding plants that produce nutritionally balanced and high‐energy f...
Article
Great Lakes coastal wetlands (GLCWs) provide critical fish habitat. The invasion of GLCWs by hybrid and narrow-leaved cattail, Typha × glauca and Typha angustifolia (hereafter Typha), homogenizes wetlands by out-competing native plant species and producing copious litter. However, the effect of this invasion on fish communities is little known. To...
Article
Full-text available
Aims We examined how mechanical management of invasive macrophyte, Typha × glauca alters plant-soil interactions underlying carbon processes and nutrient cycling, which are important to wetland function but under-represented in restoration research. Methods In the northern Great Lakes, we compared plant biomass, light transmittance, soil nutrient...
Article
Full-text available
Plant-to-plant facilitation is important in structuring communities, particularly in ecosystems with high levels of natural disturbance, where a species may ameliorate an environmental stressor, allowing colonization by another species. Increasingly, facilitation is recognized as an important factor in invasion biology. In coastal wetlands, non-nat...
Article
Full-text available
Typha is an iconic wetland plant found worldwide. Hybridization and anthropogenic disturbances have resulted in large increases in Typha abundance in wetland ecosystems throughout North America at a cost to native floral and faunal biodiversity. As demonstrated by three regional case studies, Typha is capable of rapidly colonizing habitats and form...
Article
Full-text available
Plant invasions result in biodiversity losses and altered ecological functions, though quantifying loss of multiple ecosystem functions presents a research challenge. Plant phylogenetic diversity correlates with a range of ecosystem functions and can be used as a proxy for ecosystem multifunctionality. Laurentian Great Lakes coastal wetlands are id...
Article
Full-text available
In Laurentian Great Lakes coastal wetlands (GLCWs), dominant emergent invasive plants are expanding their ranges and compromising the unique habitat and ecosystem service values that these ecosystems provide. Herbiciding and burning to control invasive plants have not been effective in part because neither strategy addresses the most common root ca...
Article
Full-text available
The ecological impacts of invasive plants increase dramatically with time since invasion. Targeting young populations for treatment is therefore an economically and ecologically effective management approach, especially when linked to post-treatment monitoring to evaluate the efficacy of management. However, collecting detailed field-based post-tre...
Article
Wetland invasion by monotypic dominant plants can alter the physicochemical and biological properties of soils that affect methane emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. We examined the effects of Typha × glauca invasion on soil methane using laboratory incubation and controlled mesocosm experiments. Typha-invaded soils collected from three Midwestern...
Article
Full-text available
Aquatic macroinvertebrates are a critical component of wetland nutrient cycling and food webs, with many fish and wildlife species depending upon them as food resources; but little is known about how invasion by dominant macrophytes may alter community dynamics. We examined the impacts of Typha invasion on aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in t...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive wetland plants are the primary targets of wetland management to promote native communities and wildlife habitat, but little is known about how commonly implemented restoration techniques influence nutrient cycling. We tested how experimental mowing, herbicide application, and biomass harvest (i.e., removal of aboveground biomass) treatment...
Article
Ecological and financial constraints limit restoration efforts, preventing the achievement of desired ecological outcomes. Harvesting invasive plant biomass for bioenergy has the potential to reduce feedback mechanisms that sustain invasion, while alleviating financial limitations. Typha × glauca is a highly productive invasive wetland plant that r...
Article
Full-text available
Wetland ecosystems maintain and improve water quality through the process of denitrification, an increasingly important ecosystem service due to global N pollution. Invasive plants have the potential to disrupt denitrification by altering the environmental conditions that facilitate this process. Great Lakes coastal wetlands are experiencing widesp...
Article
Aim: Determining the spatial-temporal spread of an invasive plant is vital for understanding long-term impacts. However, invasions have rarely been directly documented given the resources required and the need for substantial foresight. One method widely used is historical photography interpretation, but this can be hard to verify. We attempt to im...
Article
A 15N-addition mesocosm experiment was used to study competition for nitrogen (N) between the aggressive cattail species Typha × glauca (T. latifolia × T. angustifolia) Godr. (hybrid cattail) and a suite of native plant species often found in marshes Typha invades. Plant uptake of 15N released from labeled Typha and native-species litter was then m...
Article
Full-text available
The mechanisms by which invasive plants displace native species are often not well elucidated, limiting knowledge of invasion dynamics and the scientific basis for management responses. Typha×glauca Godr. invades wetlands throughout much of North America. Like other problematic wetland invaders, Typha is large, grows densely, and leaves behind copi...
Article
Full-text available
The aggressive cattail species Typha X glauca and Typha angustifolia have established in wetlands across the Great Lakes region, decreasing native plant diversity and altering environmental conditions. We relied on a parallel study in which 80 years of historical aerial photographs from a large Lake Michigan wetland complex were used to map the spr...
Article
Full-text available
Climate change is predicted to reduce Laurentian Great Lakes water levels, altering coastal wetland ecosystems and potentially stimulating invasive macrophytes, like Typha X glauca. Recent prolonged low water levels, which climaxed in 2007, created conditions comparable to those predicted by climate change science. In 2008, we examined ecosystem an...
Article
Full-text available
In regions experiencing harsh winter, eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carriere) is thought to moderate winter conditions and provide cover for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman, 1780). In Vermont, USA, eastern hemlock is the dominant tree in many white-tailed deer wintering areas. Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae Anna...
Article
Hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), Adelges tsugae Annand, an introduced aphid-like insect from Asia, is threatening to eliminate eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr., through- out its range. Among its many ecological functions, eastern hemlock provides winter cover and browse for white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus Zimmerman, in areas expe...
Article
Thesis (M.S.)--University of Vermont, 2005. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 71-78).

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