Shane Lahman Hogle

Shane Lahman Hogle
University of Turku | UTU · Department of Biology

Ph.D

About

24
Publications
8,770
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
657
Citations
Citations since 2016
19 Research Items
617 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120140
Introduction
I am a microbial evolutionary ecologist seeking to understand how microorganisms interact and how those interaction networks change through time. I am particularly interested in how microbial ecological dynamics scale to influence whole ecosystems and how this may change in a higher CO2 world. My science links experimental manipulations of idealized model microbial communities in the laboratory with field observations and the synthesis of datasets.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
University of Turku
Position
  • Researcher
April 2016 - October 2018
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2014 - December 2014
University of California, San Diego
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Teaching assistant for undergraduate level class SIO40: Life and Climate on Earth
Education
July 2010 - April 2016
University of California, San Diego
Field of study
  • Oceanography
August 2006 - May 2010
Earlham College
Field of study
  • Chemistry

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
Subsurface chlorophyll maximum layers (SCMLs) are nearly ubiquitous in stratified water columns and exist at horizontal scales ranging from the submesoscale to the extent of oligotrophic gyres. These layers of heightened chlorophyll and/or phytoplankton concentrations are generally thought to be a consequence of a balance between light energy from...
Article
Full-text available
A popular idea in ecology is that trait variation among individuals from the same species may promote the coexistence of competing species. However, theoretical and empirical tests of this idea have yielded inconsistent findings. We manipulated intraspecific trait diversity in a ciliate competing with a nematode for bacterial prey in experimental m...
Article
Full-text available
Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the most abundant photosynthesizing organisms in the oceans. Gene content variation among picocyanobacterial populations in separate ocean basins often mirrors the selective pressures imposed by the region’s distinct biogeochemistry. By pairing genomic datasets with trace metal concentrations from across the gl...
Article
Full-text available
Significance Phosphonates are a class of phosphorus metabolites characterized by a highly stable C-P bond. Phosphonates accumulate to high concentrations in seawater, fuel a large fraction of marine methane production, and serve as a source of phosphorus to microbes inhabiting nutrient-limited regions of the oligotrophic ocean. Here, we show that 1...
Preprint
Full-text available
In dynamic and spatially heterogeneous microbial communities, pairs of locally coevolved species interact between themselves and other species across multiple spatial and temporal scales. We currently do not understand how local pairwise coevolutionary processes scale to influence whole microbial communities and how local coevolutionary processes a...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prochlorococcus is one of the most abundant photosynthesizing organisms in the oligotrophic oceans. Gene content variation among Prochlorococcus populations in separate ocean basins often mirrors the selective pressures imposed by the region's distinct biogeochemistry. By pairing genomic datasets with trace metal concentrations from across the glob...
Preprint
Full-text available
Horizontal gene transfer accelerates microbial evolution, promoting diversification and adaptation. The globally abundant marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus has a highly streamlined genome with frequent gene exchange reflected in its extensive pangenome. The source of its genomic variability, however, remains elusive since most cells lack the co...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phosphonates, organic compounds with a C-P bond, constitute 20-25% of phosphorus in high molecular weight dissolved organic matter and are a significant phosphorus source for marine microbes. However, little is known about phosphonate sources, biological function, or biogeochemical cycling. Here, we determine the biogeographic distribution and prev...
Article
Full-text available
Due to a typesetting error, 25 rows were omitted from Table 3 in the original version of this Data Descriptor. These missing rows correspond to the following sample names:
Article
Full-text available
Prochlorococcus and SAR11 are among the smallest and most abundant organisms on Earth. With a combined global population of about 2.7 × 1028 cells, they numerically dominate bacterioplankton communities in oligotrophic ocean gyres and yet they have never been grown together in vitro. Here we describe co-cultures of Prochlorococcus and SAR11 isolate...
Preprint
Full-text available
Prochlorococcus and SAR11 are among the smallest and most abundant organisms on Earth. With a combined global population of about 2.7 x 10 ²⁸ cells, they numerically dominate bacterioplankton communities in oligotrophic ocean gyres and yet they have never been grown together in vitro . Here we describe co-cultures of Prochlorococcus and SAR11 isola...
Article
Full-text available
Recent advances in understanding the ecology of marine systems have been greatly facilitated by the growing availability of metagenomic data, which provide information on the identity, diversity and functional potential of the microbial community in a particular place and time. Here we present a dataset comprising over 5 terabases of metagenomic da...
Article
Full-text available
Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the dominant primary producers in marine ecosystems and perform a significant fraction of ocean carbon fixation. These cyanobacteria interact with a diverse microbial community that coexists with them. Comparative genomics of cultivated isolates has helped address questions regarding patterns of evolution and d...
Preprint
Full-text available
Subsurface chlorophyll maximum layers (SCMLs) are nearly ubiquitous in stratified water columns and exist at horizontal scales ranging from the submesoscale to the extent of oligotrophic gyres. These layers of heightened chlorophyll and/or phytoplankton concentrations are generally thought to be a consequence of a balance between light energy from...
Article
Full-text available
Iron is an essential micronutrient and can limit the growth of both marine phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of heme transport, an organic iron acquisition pathway, in phytoplankton-associated Roseobacter bacteria and explored the potential role of bacterial heme uptake in the marin...
Article
Full-text available
Although marine bacteria were identified nearly two decades ago as potential sources for strong iron-binding organic ligands detected in seawater, specific linkages between ligands detected in natural water and the microbial community remain unclear. We compared the production of different classes of iron-binding ligands, dissolved iron and macronu...
Article
Full-text available
Heterotrophic bacteria in the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages shape the marine carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur cycles, yet do so having adopted divergent ecological strategies. Currently, it is unknown whether these globally significant groups partition into specific niches with respect to micronutrients (e.g. trace metals), and how that m...
Article
Full-text available
Transitions in community genomic features and biogeochemical processes were examined in surface and subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) microbial communities across a trophic gradient from mesotrophic waters near San Diego, California to the oligotrophic Pacific. Transect end points contrasted in thermocline depth, rates of nitrogen and CO2 uptake...
Article
Full-text available
Hemes are iron containing heterocyclic molecules important in many cellular processes. In the marine environment, hemes participate as enzymatic cofactors in biogeochemically significant processes like photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrate assimilation. Further, hemoproteins, hemes, and their analogs appear to be iron sources for some marine bac...
Article
Full-text available
Hopanoids are pentacyclic triterpenoid lipids produced by many prokaryotes as cell membrane components. The structural variations of composite hopanoids, or bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs), produced by various bacterial genera makes them potentially useful molecular biomarkers of bacterial communities and metabolic processes, in both modern and ancien...
Article
Full-text available
The bioavailability and utilization of porphyrin bound iron, specifically heme, by marine microorganisms has rarely been examined. This study used Ruegeria sp. TrichCH4B as a model organism to study heme acquisition by a member of the Roseobacter clade. Analogs of known heme transporter proteins were found within the Ruegeria sp. TrichCH4B genome....
Article
Full-text available
On April 20, 2010, the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig resulted in the loss of 11 lives and the largest oil spill in US history (Graham et al., 2010) and perhaps the second largest in the world, after the first Gulf War Oil Spill from Kuwait. Over the 84 days following the explosion, an estimated 6.7 x 105 mT of Louisiana Sweet Cru...

Network

Cited By