Shams Quader

Shams Quader
Mount Saint Vincent University · Sociology/Anthropology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

10
Publications
820
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20
Citations
Introduction
I am a Communications Researcher with academic and research training in Media and Communications, Cultural and Creative Industries, and Gender and Cultural Studies across multiple degrees, specializing in transnational music scenes, sustainable independent cultural production, musician labour, and the night-time economy. My research is informed by qualitative methods to explore transnational, diasporic, and transcultural approaches that problematize traditional hemispheric binaries.

Publications

Publications (10)
Article
Full-text available
This article examines how members of the Central Sydney independent music scene practice independence within its cultural economy. Based on qualitative strategies of inquiry including semistructured interviews with 15 individuals over the age of 18 who are involved with the scene, and participant observation at live gigs recording detailed field no...
Article
Full-text available
This article discusses how the Central Sydney independent musicians’ ‘online DIY’ (do-it yourself) practices not only provide additional opportunities for practising ‘independence’, but such practices, established pre-COVID- 19, allow them to sustain their networking during the pandemic. Empirical findings that inform this article are based on qual...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper explores how independent musicians in Central Sydney, Australia organise the cultural production of their self and personality on online social media, as a part of larger strategies to promote their music and brand. It is based on my PhD research – a part of which focuses on how digital technologies provide different opportunities for Ce...
Thesis
Full-text available
Independent music is a complex concept. It has meant different things at different historical moments of popular music and within academic, music press and industry discourses. Even though what independent music refers to might not be substantive, it has tended to signify an oppositional ethos comprising practices related to maintaining distinction...
Article
Full-text available
This article examines the metal scene in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and attempts to explain how the resources crucial to its birth and continued existence can be understood through Bourdieu’s different forms of capital. This local metal scene, which is part of a larger alternative music, is a youth-based male-dominated, non-commercial and non-professional...
Article
This article aims to examine how and why the urban metal scene in Bangladesh came into existence. Based on interviews with key figures in the scene, ethnographic observation and textual analysis, the article proposes that urban youths’ frustration with the poor state of conditions in the country is channeled into a passion to build an alternative s...
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to shed light on how and why the underground urban metal scene in Bangladesh came into existence, and why it takes the forms it takes in this post-colonial country. Consistent with much recent work about alternative rock, it is argued that the concept of scene is helpful in this task because it allows a framework through which to...
Article
Full-text available
E-commerce is emerging as powerful tool for gender empowerment in developing countries. There are many small and medium e-commerce projects which are operated by women through social media in Bangladesh. This article investigates the use of ICTs as an empowerment tool by women entrepreneurs operating online bakery stores on Facebook in Dhaka city....
Article
Full-text available
In a country like Bangladesh, Internet accessibility and usage capacity is still limited only to people of major cities, where the number of young urban adults using online social network sites (SNS) is on the rise. This study tried to explore the reasons private university undergraduate students of Dhaka city are using online SNS, what they do on...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Archived project
This thesis is about understanding the birth, development and maintenance of a subcultural alternative music scene located in the unique urban socio-historic milieu of the postcolonial developing country of Bangladesh. Locally dubbed the underground, this cultural phenomenon is a youth based male dominated, non-commercial and non-professional music scene, based on international genres of metal as well as other foreign alternative music genres. This alternative music scene revolves around the activities of largely middle-class, part-time, male musicians who share particular economic, cultural and social resources that afford their participation in it. The main focus of this research is to understand these social, cultural and economic conditions of possibility of the scene that explain why it exists in its current form. Questions about the usefulness and limitations of theoretical frameworks based on alternative rock related youth cultures will be assessed by the empirical study of this local alternative music scene. These theoretical models, largely developed in Western Anglophone countries, explain distinctive configurations of symbolic, social and economic elements through which a particular scene is mobilized. Are these Western theoretical models enough to explain this local alternative music scene, or are local contextual factors of paramount importance? This is one of the notions that are explored in detail in this thesis. In the locale of post-colonial Bangladesh, the actors involved express their sentiments towards local situations with the resources available to them through the motivations of ‘local factors’ which accentuate a rather unique discourse of an alternative music scene. Studies of appropriation, impact and function of metal genres in other Asian countries like China, Japan, Nepal, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore have been done before, but never in Bangladesh, where there is an overall lacking of music related scholarly work in English. Based upon interviews with key figures of the scene, ethnographic observation and textual analysis, this research suggests that the urban youth’s frustration towards the poor situation of the country is channeled into desires to develop an alternative liberal space of artistic autonomy through the exploration of foreign music styles and the fantasy worlds of metal. While participants assert aesthetic distinction of their music from mainstream rock, one of the main findings shows that they are not concerned about ideas of selling out to the corporate music industry if they become popular without sacrificing aesthetic integrity. Emphasis is placed on translocal connections with other alternative music scenes elsewhere. The empirical findings from this thesis raises questions about the extent to which this local scene represents Western discourses of alternative rock and whether its transnationalism is properly explained through hybridization of international cultural forms.