Shai Agmon

Shai Agmon
University of Oxford | OX · Department of Politics and International Relations

Phd Candidate Department of Politics and International Relations

About

7
Publications
223
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
18
Citations
Citations since 2017
6 Research Items
18 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
20172018201920202021202220230246810
Introduction
Shai does research in political theory, public policy and jurisprudence. His most recent publication is 'Undercutting Justice - Why Legal Representation Should Not Be Allocated by the Market'.
Education
September 2015 - October 2016
The London School of Economics and Political Science
Field of study
  • Philosophy and Public Policy
January 2014 - April 2014
New York University
Field of study
  • Paths to Peace Program
September 2012 - September 2017
Tel Aviv University
Field of study
  • Law

Publications

Publications (7)
Article
Full-text available
Thomas Jefferson’s famous proposal, whereby a state’s constitution should be re-enacted every 19 years by a majority vote, purports to solve the intergenerational problem caused by perpetual constitutions: namely that laws which were enacted by people who are already dead bind living citizens without their consent. I argue that the model fails to f...
Article
Full-text available
A well-known objection to prioritarianism, famously levelled by Mike Otsuka and Alex Voorhoeve, is that it wrongly ignores the unity of the individual in treating intra-personal cases like inter-personal cases. In this paper we accept that there should be a moral shift between these cases, but argue that this is because autonomy is a relevant consi...
Article
Full-text available
The adversarial legal system is traditionally praised for its normative appeal: it protects individual rights; ensures an equal, impartial, and consistent application of the law; and, most importantly, its competitive structure facilitates the discovery of truth – both in terms of the facts, and in terms of the correct interpretation of the law. At...
Article
Despite being largely overlooked in the literature, Israel provides a rare example of what a full decade of twenty-first century populism in power looks like. Based on an examination of rhetoric and policymaking between 2009 and 2019, this article brings the writing on the subject up to date and highlights the unique traits of Israeli populism. In...
Article
I offer a novel distinction between two concepts of competition. The first, parallel competition, is designed to create separate pathways for each competitor wherein they can maximize their performance. The second, friction competition, is designed to facilitate a clash between competitors. Each concept is utilized as an institutional mechanism to...
Article
Full-text available
The adversarial legal system is traditionally praised for its normative appeal: it protects individual rights; ensures an equal, impartial, and consistent application of the law; and, most importantly, its competitive structure facilitates the discovery of truth – both in terms of the facts, and in terms of the correct interpretation of the law. At...

Network

Cited By