Sha Ni

Sha Ni
Lund University | LU · Centre for Environmental and Climate Research

Doctor of Philosophy

About

6
Publications
1,525
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18
Citations
Citations since 2016
6 Research Items
18 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220123456

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Full-text available
Climate during the Last Interglacial period (LIG, Marine Isotope Stage 5e) was on average warmer than the present, with a higher global sea level but also more unstable conditions. Today, the Baltic Sea interacts strongly with conditions in the North Atlantic region, and this interaction was likely even stronger during the LIG. We here present a re...
Article
Full-text available
Hypoxia is of increasing concern in marine areas, calling for a better understanding of mechanisms leading to decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations ([O2]). Much can be learned about the processes and implications of deoxygenation for marine ecosystems using proxy records from low‐oxygen sites, provided proxies, such as the manganese (Mn) to ca...
Article
Full-text available
The chemical composition of foraminiferal calcite is widely used for studying past environmental conditions and biogeochemistry. However, high rates of microbial organic matter degradation and abundant dissolved metal sources in sediments and pore waters may impede the application of foraminifera-based proxies due to formation of secondary carbonat...
Article
Full-text available
Deoxygenation affects many continental shelf seas across the world today and results in increasing areas of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen concentration ([O2]) <1.4 ml/L). The Baltic Sea is increasingly affected by deoxygenation. Deoxygenation correlates with other environmental variables such as changing water temperature and salinity and is directly l...
Article
Full-text available
The calcareous tubeworm Spirorbis spirorbis is a widespread serpulid species in the Baltic Sea, where it commonly grows as an epibiont on brown macroalgae (genus Fucus). It lives within a Mg-calcite shell and could be affected by ocean acidification and temperature rise induced by the predicted future atmospheric CO2 increase. However, Spirorbis tu...
Article
Full-text available
The calcareous tubeworm Spirorbis spirorbis is a wide-spread serpulid species in the Baltic Sea, where it commonly grows as an epibiont on brown macroalgae (genus Fucus). It lives within a Mg-calcite shell and could be affected by ocean acidification and temperature rise induced by the predicted future atmospheric CO2 increase. However, Spirorbis t...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
Human activities in coastal areas are accelerating in the last 200 years, increasing pressures as warming, oxygen depletion, and ocean acidification on organisms and ecosystems. These environmental changes can lead to multiple social-ecological problems. To better understand these potential future threats, we need to develop tools to compare our present situation and events that happened in the past. Foraminifera are tiny marine microorganisms. Their shells are made of calcium carbonate and abundantly fossilized in marine sediments. Foraminifera are currently used as recorders of the past as the chemical composition of their shells reflects environmental conditions. Their changes in morphology are recently used thanks to the 3D development imagery acquired with microtomography. However, the current method used is time-consuming and allows a few specimens analyzed (one specimen every 24h). This project aims to develop protocols and post-data analysis by using synchrotron facilities, allowing to generate long time series of hundreds of specimens (one specimen every 30min) required to obtain statistically valid conclusions. Thus, we hypothesize that the foraminiferal calcite will respond to the changed environmental conditions by having changed shell morphology (size, weight, volume, pore density).