Seyed M. K. Sadr

Seyed M. K. Sadr
University of Exeter | UoE · College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, Centre For Water Systems

PhD in Water and Process Engineering

About

34
Publications
26,405
Reads
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239
Citations
Citations since 2016
21 Research Items
230 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
Additional affiliations
March 2020 - present
University of Exeter
Position
  • Research Associate
March 2017 - February 2018
University of Exeter
Position
  • Fellow
July 2014 - October 2015
University of Exeter
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
April 2011 - November 2014
University of Surrey
Field of study
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering

Publications

Publications (34)
Chapter
Deforestation, severe floods, and other large-scale natural disasters indicate the major effects of human activities on the environment. Water resources as complex systems are stochastic, dynamic, and continuous. The complexity of water resources can significantly be increased by human interventions. The Agent-Based Models (ABMs) are known as an ef...
Article
This paper describes the development and application of a simulation tool to assess the impact of water-efficient appliances and greywater recycling strategies on the domestic water consumption and wastewater generation profiles. Two time-series datasets of domestic water consumption in UK households – each consisting of more than 20,000 observatio...
Article
Full-text available
Despite considerable efforts to improve water management, India is becoming increasingly water stressed due to multiple factors, including climate change, increasing population, and urbanization. We address one of the most challenging problems in the design of water treatment plants: how to select a suitable technology for a specific scenario or co...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging threats such as climate change and urbanisation pose an unprecedented challenge to integrated management of urban wastewater systems, which are expected to function in a reliable, resilient and sustainable manner regardless of future conditions. Traditional long term planning is rather limited in developing no-regret strategies that avoid...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Water recycling and reuse has become a common practice in order to alleviate pressures on the existing water sources. Over the last few years, Emerging Contaminants (ECs), such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, have been increasingly detected in the treated wastewater in Wastewater Treatment (WWT) plants across the world. This is due t...
Article
The aim of this study was to produce optimal wastewater treatment solutions to calculate the removal of different contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) found in developing countries. A new methodology was developed for a decision support tool (WaStewater Decision support OptiMiser, WiSDOM), which focuses on producing treatment solutions suited to...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The selection of suitable wastewater treatment solutions is a complex problem that requires the careful consideration of many factors. With water at a premium and water consumption increasing, India is facing a challenging time ahead, requiring effective water treatment solutions. The Wastewater Decision Support Optimizer (WiSDOM) presented here is...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Over the past decade the research surrounding the occurrence, source, fate and removal of emerging pollutants has been increasing. The aim of this study was to create an add-on program which analyses the removal of emerging pollutants, to an existing decision support tool (WiSDOM). The tool was also used to evaluate the performance of each optimal...
Article
Full-text available
Wastewater Treatment (WWT) for water reuse applications has been accepted as a strategic solution in improving water supplies across the globe; however, there are still various challenges that should be overcome. Selection of practical solutions is then required whilst considering technical, environmental, socio-cultural, and financial factors. In...
Article
Full-text available
Reliability, resilience and sustainability are key goals of any urban drainage system. However, only a few studies have recently focused on measuring, operationalizing and comparing such concepts in a world of deep uncertainty. In this study, these key concepts are defined and quantified for a number of gray, green and hybrid strategies, aimed at i...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster introduces a major UK-India collaborative research project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) UK and the Department of Science and Technology (DST) India. The aim of the project is to study the fate of emerging contaminants (ECs) in two major Indian rivers, wastewater treatment works and groundwater. The project a...
Article
Full-text available
An estimated one-third of water points in rural sub-Saharan Africa are non-functioning at any one time because of lack of upkeep. Communities are left without access to clean drinking water and this has multiple knock-on developmental impacts. An innovative pre-payment and Internet-of-Things enabled “e-Tap” based water technology and management sys...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging contaminants have been increasingly studied over the past decade to improve the understanding of their fate, occurrence and toxicological effects on the environment and human health. Originally wastewater treatment plants were not designed to remove these pollutants of emerging concern. However, research is now focusing on determining whic...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: To explore the relation between water consumption and water use behaviour and attitudes, and devices applied in households in urban areas in India. Methodology and study site: This paper presents the results of a domestic water consumption survey carried out in Jaipur, India. A questionnaire containing over 60 questions was developed to collec...
Conference Paper
Rising water demands, deficits in wastewater treatment and changing climatic conditions have led to water scarcity and pollution in many Indian regions, threatening society and ecosystems. In the EU Water4India project drinking water treatment options are studied to develop smart and cost-effective solutions and decision support for Indian communit...
Poster
Full-text available
India is facing a number of significant challenges to its capacity to provide safe water throughout the country. Its historically poor water infrastructure, combined with high economic growth, quickly rising population and rapid urbanisation has led to serious pressure upon the water resources of the country. India must now invest in its centralise...
Poster
Full-text available
Decision making for the context specific selection of wastewater treatment technologies at different scales is a complex process requiring consideration to several factors including: influent water quality, intended use of effluents, available resources (land, technical ability of locally available manpower, local availability of chemicals and capi...
Conference Paper
Freshwater scarcity has become one of the most challenging issues and it needs worldwide attention. Although a considerable progress has been made to develop sustainable water management strategies and fit for the purpose water treatment alternatives, their cost effective implementation and long run smooth operation still remains a challenge in dev...
Article
Aim: To explore the relation between water consumption and water use behaviour and attitudes, and devices applied in households in urban areas in India. Methodology and study site: This paper presents the results of a domestic water consumption survey carried out in Jaipur, India. A questionnaire containing over 60 questions was developed to collec...
Conference Paper
The water resources in India are under increasing pressure with rapidly dropping groundwater levels and growing water scarcity due to rising demands and climate change. The EU FP7 Project Water4India (www.water4india.eu/) aims at studying different centralized and decentralized options for drinking water treatment in India and at developing smart a...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aim: To explore the relation between water consumption and water use behaviour and attitudes, and devices applied in households in urban areas in India. Methodology and study site: This paper presents the results of a domestic water consumption survey carried out in Jaipur, India. A questionnaire containing over 60 questions was developed to collec...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Aims: This study aims to provide a Decision Support Software (DSS) tool for the water and energy-efficient design of water treatment works (WTWs) in India and to compare two alternative methods of optimisation of the treatment options for all unit processes and stages in the WTW. This applies to both potable water and wastewater treatment solution...
Chapter
The occurrence of emerging or newly identified contaminants in water resources is becoming a great concern for public health. The worldwide freshwater scarcity is also increasing. These have resulted in rapid growth in the demand for nonconventional water resources and sophisticated approaches to wastewater treatment. Existing conventional water tr...
Article
Full-text available
Water scarcity, pertaining to many interrelated issues e.g. rapid urbanisation and increasing water pollution, has been acknowledged around the world. Water reuse has emerged as a viable water conservation measure to satisfy water demand in many communities. Among the diversity of wastewater treatment processes, membrane assisted treatment technolo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The problem of water scarcity has been admitted across the globe. Water reuse opens opportunities for natural water quality improvement, and an improved management of competing water demands. In recent years, membrane assisted technologies have been reasoned to be decidedly reliable in various water reuse scenarios (Shannon et al., 2008). Consideri...
Article
Full-text available
The problem of fresh water scarcity is becoming a global issue, due to rapid urbanisation,population growth, water pollution, climate change and compounded effects. The incorporation of water reuse in upcoming urban water systems will not only satisfy a large part of water demand but also create a situation where wastewater treatment will be essent...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Nanofiltration (NF) is an effectual and ecologically convenient technology for decontamination and water reuse. NF in a large number of studies has shown the capability of removing different emerging organic micro-pollutants such as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs). The major problems involved in nan...
Article
In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) method was applied to model the electrical conductivity (EC) of drainage water, based on the effects of irrigation water quality parameters such as HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, Ca2+, Ma2+, Na+, area information (leaching area and planted area), weather conditions (temperature, evaporation and precipitation) a...
Conference Paper
The problem of water scarcity is becoming global issue, especially under the current situation with rapid urbanisation, population growth, water pollution, climate change and compounded effects. From sustainability point of view, the incorporation of water reuse in upcoming urban water systems will not only satisfy a large part of water demand but...

Questions

Questions (2)
Question
Any project like Newater, which is  the brand name given to reclaimed water produced by Singapore's Public Utilities Board. , it is treated wastewater that has been purified using microfiltration, reverse osmosis and ultraviolet technologies, in addition to conventional water treatment processes. 
Question
I am aware that there are a number of reasons e.g.
·       Fuzzy Logic describes systems in terms of a combination of numeric and linguistic (symbolic). This has advantages over pure mathematical (numerical) approaches or pure symbolic approaches because very often system knowledge is available in such a combination.
·       The fuzzy logic measures the certainty or uncertainty of membership of element of the set. Analogously the man makes decision during the mental and physical activities. The solution of certain case is found on the principle of rules that were defined by fuzzy logics for similar cases.
·       Fuzzy algorithms are often robust, in the sense that they are not very sensitive to changing environments and erroneous or forgotten rules.
·       The reasoning process is often simple, compared to computationally precise systems, so computing power is saved. This is a very interesting feature, especially in real time systems.
·       Fuzzy methods usually have a shorter development time than conventional methods.
 but I am 100% sure which one comes first and why? Thanks

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Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
To study the sources and fate of emerging contaminants and their interactions in receiving waters and wastewater treatment facilities in India and develop novel and sustainable management strategies for improved water quality.
Project
SARASWATI: Supporting consolidation, replication and up-scaling of sustainable wastewater treatment and reuse technologies for India SARASWATI aims to assess the sustainability and potential of technologies already existing in India for wastewater treatment, reclamation and reuse, as well as newly piloted EU technologies. In order to assess the potential of new EU technologies to solve the real water challenges in India, it is crucial to have detailed knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of the technologies that already exist in India. SARASWATI will further investigate in detail the reasons that have led to either successful or unsuccessful technology implementations. Based on a thorough understanding of the performance of existing technologies and the reasons that led to success or failure, SARASWATI will be able to develop sound recommendations on how the sustainability and potential of the studied technologies can be (further) increased to make them more suitable to solve the water challenges in India. The key objectives of the full project include: to provide a comprehensive documentation of existing wastewater treatment, reclamation and reuse technologies in India; to pilot proven EU technologies that have the potential to solve real water challenges in India; to conduct an independent and integrated assessment of the existing technologies in India; to suggest strategies for measures to further improve the sustainability of both EU and non-EU technologies for solving water challenges in India and to assess the overall potential of all of the technologies; to provide tools to facilitate replication and large-scale deployment of the technologies with the best potential to cope with the targeted real life water problems in India; and to synthesise the research results and to achieve effective dissemination and take-up in practice, and the mainstreaming of results.