Seth G N Grant

Seth G N Grant
The University of Edinburgh | UoE · Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences

About

316
Publications
41,970
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
27,936
Citations
Citations since 2017
37 Research Items
9793 Citations
201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,500
201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,500
201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,500
201720182019202020212022202305001,0001,500
Additional affiliations
January 2011 - December 2012
University of Nottingham
January 2011 - present
National Institutes of Health
January 2010 - December 2012

Publications

Publications (316)
Article
Full-text available
Neurodevelopmental disorders of genetic origin delay the acquisition of normal abilities and cause disabling phenotypes. Nevertheless, spontaneous attenuation and even complete amelioration of symptoms in early childhood and adolescence can occur in many disorders, suggesting that brain circuits possess an intrinsic capacity to overcome the deficit...
Article
Full-text available
The lifetime of proteins in synapses is important for their signaling, maintenance, and remodeling, and for memory duration. We quantified the lifetime of endogenous PSD95, an abundant postsynaptic protein in excitatory synapses, at single-synapse resolution across the mouse brain and lifespan, generating the Protein Lifetime Synaptome Atlas. Excit...
Preprint
Full-text available
Cellular inclusions of hyperphosphorylated TAR-DNA-Binding Protein 43 (TDP-43) are a key hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). ALS is characterised by a loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord that is preceded by early-stage changes in synaptic function that may be associated with TDP-43 path...
Article
Full-text available
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Separate lines of evidence suggest that synapses and astrocytes play a role in the pathological mechanisms underlying ALS. Given that astrocytes make specialised contacts with some synapses, called tripartite synapses, we hypothesise that tripartite synapses could act as the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Neurodevelopmental disorders of genetic origin delay the acquisition of normal abilities and cause disabling phenotypes. Spontaneous attenuation and even complete amelioration of symptoms in early childhood and adolescence occur in many disorders, suggesting that brain circuits possess an intrinsic capacity to repair themselves. We examined the mol...
Preprint
Full-text available
Protein turnover is required for synapse maintenance and remodelling and may impact memory duration. We quantified the lifetime of postsynaptic protein PSD95 in individual excitatory synapses across the mouse brain and lifespan, generating the Protein Lifetime Synaptome Atlas. Excitatory synapses have a wide range of protein lifetimes that may exte...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Genes encoding synaptic proteins are highly associated with neuronal disorders many of which show clinical co-morbidity. We integrated 58 published synaptic proteomic datasets that describe over 8000 proteins and combined them with direct protein–protein interactions and functional metadata to build a network resource that reveals the shar...
Preprint
Glutamatergic synapses form the vast majority of connections within neuronal circuits but how these subcellular structures are molecularly organized within the mammalian brain is poorly understood. Conventional electron microscopy using chemically fixed, metal-stained tissue has identified a proteinaceous, membrane-associated thickening called the...
Preprint
Full-text available
Altered brain energy metabolism associated with increase in lactate levels and the resultant decrease in pH have been increasingly implicated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism spectrum disorder and neurodegenerative disorders. Although it is controversial, change of pH/ lactate level as a primar...
Article
Full-text available
The postsynaptic terminal of vertebrate excitatory synapses contains a highly conserved multiprotein complex that comprises neurotransmitter receptors, cell‐adhesion molecules, scaffold proteins and enzymes, which are essential for brain signalling and plasticity underlying behaviour. Increasingly, mutations in genes that encode postsynaptic protei...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies have shown an unexpectedly high degree of synapse diversity arising from molecular and morphological differences among individual synapses. Diverse synapse types are spatially distributed within individual dendrites, between different neurons, and across and between brain regions, producing the synaptome architecture of the brain. Th...
Article
Full-text available
Determining the number of synapses that are present in different brain regions is crucial to understand brain connectivity as a whole. Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that are expressed in excitatory glutamatergic synapses. We used genetic labeling of two of these proteins (PSD95 and SAP102), and...
Article
Brain synapses through the life span Excitatory synapses connect neurons in the brain to build the circuits that enable behavior. Cizeron et al. surveyed synapses in the mouse brain from birth to old age and present the data as a community resource, the Mouse Lifespan Synaptome Atlas (see the Perspective by Micheva et al. ). Molecular and morpholog...
Article
Full-text available
Mapping the molecular composition of individual excitatory synapses across the mouse brain reveals high synapse diversity with each brain region showing a distinct composition of synapse types. As a first step toward systematic mapping of synapse diversity across the human brain, we have labelled and imaged synapses expressing the excitatory synaps...
Article
Full-text available
Functionally distinct synapses exhibit diverse and complex organisation at molecular and nanoscale levels. Synaptic diversity may be dependent on developmental stage, anatomical locus and the neural circuit within which synapses reside. Furthermore, astrocytes, which align with pre and post-synaptic structures to form “tripartite synapses”, can mod...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the remarkable molecular complexity of synapses has been revealed, with over 1000 proteins identified in the synapse proteome. Although it is known that different receptors and other synaptic proteins are present in different types of neurons, the extent of synapse diversity across the brain is largely unknown. This is mainly due t...
Article
Full-text available
Aims: Synaptic Ras GTPase-activating protein 1 (SYNGAP1) regulates synaptic plasticity through AMPA receptor trafficking. SYNGAP1 mutations have been found in human patients with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Almost every individual with SYNGAP1-related ID develops epilepsy, and approximately 50% have ASD. SYNGAP...
Article
Full-text available
Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites that receive most of the excitatory synaptic inputs, and thus provide the structural basis for synaptic function. Here, we describe an accurate method for measurement and analysis of spine morphology based on structured illumination microscopy (SIM) and computational geometry in cultured neurons. Surface...
Article
The purpose of this article is to outline a new molecular and synaptic theory of behavior called the "synaptomic theory," named because it is centered on the synaptome-the complement of synapses in the brain. Synaptomic theory posits that synapses are structures of high molecular complexity and vast diversity that are observable in maps of the brai...
Article
Inhibition of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) decouples N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor downstream signaling and results in neuroprotection after focal cerebral ischemia. We have previously developed UCCB01-144, a dimeric PSD-95 inhibitor, which binds PSD-95 with high affinity and is neuroprotective in experimental stroke. Here, we in...
Preprint
Full-text available
Although molecular mechanisms underpinning specific behaviors have been described, whether there are mechanisms that orchestrate a behavioral repertoire is unknown. To test if the postsynaptic proteome of excitatory synapses could impart such a mechanism we conducted the largest genetic study of mammalian synapses yet undertaken. A repertoire of si...
Preprint
Full-text available
How is the information encoded within patterns of nerve impulses converted into diverse behavioral responses? To address this question, we conducted the largest genetic study to date of the electrophysiological and behavioral properties of synapses. Postsynaptic responses to elementary patterns of activity in the hippocampal CA1 region were measure...
Article
Full-text available
The GluN2 subtype (2A versus 2B) determines biophysical properties and signaling of forebrain NMDA receptors (NMDARs). During development, GluN2A becomes incorporated into previously GluN2B-dominated NMDARs. This “switch” is proposed to be driven by distinct features of GluN2 cytoplasmic C-terminal domains (CTDs), including a unique CaMKII interact...
Chapter
The synapse is composed of ∼2000 proteins, and mutations and genetic variants in these proteins result in a large number of disorders, collectively known as synaptopathies. A major subset of synapse proteins assemble with membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins into multiprotein complexes known as MAGUK-associated signaling complexes...
Article
Full-text available
The molecular features of synapses in the hippocampus underpin current models of learning and cognition. Although synapse ultra-structural diversity has been described in the canonical hippocampal circuitry, our knowledge of sub-synaptic organisation of synaptic molecules remains largely unknown. To address this, mice were engineered to express Pos...
Article
Full-text available
How neuronal proteomes self-organize is poorly understood because of their inherent molecular and cellular complexity. Here, focusing on mammalian synapses we use blue-native PAGE and 'gene-tagging' of GluN1 to report the first biochemical purification of endogenous NMDA receptors (NMDARs) directly from adult mouse brain. We show that NMDARs partit...
Article
Full-text available
The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression...
Article
Full-text available
How the sophisticated vertebrate behavioural repertoire evolved remains a major question in biology. The behavioural repertoire encompasses the set of individual behavioural components that an organism uses when adapting and responding to changes in its external world. Although unicellular organisms, invertebrates and vertebrates share simple refle...
Article
Full-text available
The cell types that trigger the primary pathology in many brain diseases remain largely unknown. One route to understanding the primary pathological cell type for a particular disease is to identify the cells expressing susceptibility genes. Although this is straightforward for monogenic conditions where the causative mutation may alter expression...
Article
Full-text available
Unlabelled: Previous studies have hypothesized that diverse genetic causes of intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) converge on common cellular pathways. Testing this hypothesis requires detailed phenotypic analyses of animal models with genetic mutations that accurately reflect those seen in the human condition (i.e.,...
Article
Full-text available
Development of effective therapies for brain disorders has been hampered by a lack of translational cognitive testing methods. We present the first example of using the identical touchscreen-based cognitive test to assess mice and humans carrying disease-related genetic mutations. This new paradigm has significant implications for improving how we...
Article
Full-text available
The function of the nervous system depends on the integrity of synapses and the patterning of electrical activity in brain circuits. The rapid advances in genome sequencing reveal a large number of mutations disrupting synaptic proteins, which potentially result in diseases known as synaptopathies. However, it is also evident that every normal indi...
Article
Full-text available
Neurotransmission and synaptic strength depend on expression of post-synaptic receptors on the cell surface. Post-translational modification of receptors, trafficking to the synapse through the secretory pathway, and subsequent insertion into the synapse involves interaction of the receptor with A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) and scaffolding prot...
Article
Full-text available
Background Neural circuits can spontaneously generate complex spatiotemporal firing patterns during development. This spontaneous activity is thought to help guide development of the nervous system. In this study, we had two aims. First, to characterise the changes in spontaneous activity in cultures of developing networks of either hippocampal or...
Article
Full-text available
Traumatic fear memories are highly durable but also dynamic, undergoing repeated reactivation and rehearsal over time. Although overly persistent fear memories underlie anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder, the key neural and molecular mechanisms underlying fear memory durability remain unclear. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95)...
Article
Full-text available
Background Synapses are fundamental components of brain circuits and are disrupted in over 100 neurological and psychiatric diseases. The synapse proteome is physically organized into multiprotein complexes and polygenic mutations converge on postsynaptic complexes in schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability. Directly characterising human...
Data
Full-text available
Mendelian ratio of Fltp intercrosses on different backgrounds.(A–C) Fltp animals are born roughly at the expected Mendelian ratio in C57Bl6/6NCrl, 129S6/SvEvTac, or CD1 background. Note: FltpZV/ZV animals are slightly underrepresented on the C57Bl6 and 129S6 background.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03842.004
Preprint
Full-text available
Background: Neural circuits can spontaneously generate complex spatiotemporal firing patterns during development. This spontaneous activity is thought to help guide development of the nervous system. In this study, we had two aims. First, to characterise the changes in spontaneous activity in cultures of developing networks of either hippocampal or...
Article
ABSTRACT Excessive activation of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) mediate neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration under many neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by the preferential loss of medium spiny projection neuron...
Conference Paper
The brain is the most complex organ, yet the molecular principles underlying its organisation are poorly understood. Transcriptome analysis provides insight into expressed proteins but offers no information on their higher-order assembly into multiprotein complexes and larger molecular machines. These protein assemblies confer sophisticated propert...
Article
Full-text available
Inherited alleles account for most of the genetic risk for schizophrenia. However, new (de novo) mutations, in the form of large chromosomal copy number changes, occur in a small fraction of cases and disproportionally disrupt genes encoding postsynaptic proteins. Here we show that small de novo mutations, affecting one or a few nucleotides, are ov...
Article
Full-text available
Schizophrenia is a common disease with a complex aetiology, probably involving multiple and heterogeneous genetic factors. Here, by analysing the exome sequences of 2,536 schizophrenia cases and 2,543 controls, we demonstrate a polygenic burden primarily arising from rare (less than 1 in 10,000), disruptive mutations distributed across many genes....
Article
The neural and genetic factors underlying chronic tolerance to alcohol are currently unclear. The GluN2A N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) subunit and the NMDAR-anchoring protein PSD-95 mediate acute alcohol intoxication and represent putative mechanisms mediating tolerance. We found that chronic intermittent ethanol exposure (CIE) did not pro...
Article
Full-text available
Differences in general cognitive ability (intelligence) account for approximately half of the variation in any large battery of cognitive tests and are predictive of important life events including health. Genome-wide analyses of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms indicate that they jointly tag between a quarter and a half of the variance in in...
Article
Association studies implicate multiple PDZ domain protein (MPDZ/MUPP1) sequence and/or expression in risk for alcoholism in humans and ethanol withdrawal (EW) in mice, but confirmation has been hindered by the dearth of targeted genetic models. We report the creation of transgenic (MPDZ-TG) and knockout heterozygote (Mpdz(+/-) ) mice, with increase...
Article
The CYFIP1/SRA1 gene is located in a chromosomal region linked to various neurological disorders, including intellectual disability, autism, and schizo-phrenia. CYFIP1 plays a dual role in two apparently unrelated processes, inhibiting local protein synthe-sis and favoring actin remodeling. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF...
Article
Full-text available
The CYFIP1/SRA1 gene is located in a chromosomal region linked to various neurological disorders, including intellectual disability, autism, and schizophrenia. CYFIP1 plays a dual role in two apparently unrelated processes, inhibiting local protein synthesis and favoring actin remodeling. Here, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-...
Chapter
Human synapses contain over 1000 proteins forming the synapse proteome and diseases that disrupt these proteins cause synaptopathy. Hundreds of gene mutations in synapse proteins cause over 130 brain diseases including major psychiatric, neurological and childhood developmental disorders. The synapse proteome is organized into the presynaptic and p...
Article
This resource provides information from numerous levels of analysis including molecular biology and genetics, cellular physiology, neuroanatomy, neuropharmacology, epidemiology, and behavior. In doing so it translates information from the basic laboratory to the clinical laboratory and finally to clinical treatment. The result is an excellent and c...
Article
Human disorders of cognition arise from hundreds of gene mutations and mice serve as models for developing and testing therapeutic approaches. Recent advancements using touchscreen psychological tests that measure similar components of cognition in mice and humans can be combined with genetics. These experiments formally demonstrate that different...
Article
Full-text available
Two genome duplications early in the vertebrate lineage expanded gene families, including GluN2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. Diversification between the four mammalian GluN2 proteins occurred primarily at their intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs). To identify shared ancestral functions and diversified subunit-specific functions, we exchanged...