Setegn Gebeyehu

Setegn Gebeyehu
International Potato Center

About

26
Publications
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375
Citations

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Full-text available
This article reports on a study that assessed the qualities of rice seeds collected from formal and informal channels in Tanzania. Seed sources used by farmers and the seed selection and management practices followed also were examined. More than 90% of farmers’ seed samples met the national standards for key seed quality parameters. Field grow-out...
Article
Full-text available
Returns on investment into development of new rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties are realized when the varieties are widely used by farmers to enhance crop productivity. This study was conducted to investigate the dynamics in the use of improved varieties/seeds and the sources preferred by farmers. The study employed formal survey and a multistage, r...
Article
Full-text available
Phosphorus (P) deficiency in the soil is one of the major factors limiting common bean production in Ethiopia. A pot experiment was conducted in a glasshouse at Hawassa University in southern Ethiopia to evaluate twelve common bean cultivars for P use efficiency at three phosphorus rates (0, 120, and 240 kg P2O5 ha⁻¹). The results of the study reve...
Article
Full-text available
Common bean variety selection within its production environment is often challenged by the occurrence of significant genotype-by-environment interactions (GEI) in the variety development process. Grain yield performance of 16 navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines was tested in a multi-environment variety trial during 2010 and 2011 main growing se...
Article
Full-text available
Field experiments were conducted to investigate the response of common bean to the application of phosphorus, lime and compost under field condition at Areka during Belg and Meher seasons in 2013. The treatments consisted of three rates of compost (0, 5 and 10 tonnes ha-1), three rates of lime (0, 0.64 and 1.28 tonne ha-1) and three rates of phosph...
Article
Full-text available
Scarcity of freshwater due to recurrent drought threatens the sustainable crop production in semi-arid regions of Ethiopia. Deficit irrigation is thought to be one of the promising strategies to increase water use efficiency (WUE) under scarce water resources. A study was carried out to investigate the effect of alternate furrow irrigation (AFI), d...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the variation in physiological response to deficit irrigation together with better knowledge on physiological characteristics of different genotypes that contribute to drought adaptation mechanisms would be helpful in transferring different irrigation technologies to farmers. A field experiment was carried to investigate the physiolog...
Article
Soil acidity affects seed yield and crop quality negatively due to aluminium toxicity in most humid tropics where the crop is cultivated for food and cash income by smallholder farmers. This study was conducted to assess the effect of different exchangeable aluminium concentrations on bean chemical quality of two common bean genotypes grown on lime...
Article
One of the major causes of low yield of common bean in Ethiopia is the shortage and/or inaccessibility of high quality seed. In the Hararghe highlands of eastern Ethiopia, farmers often use common bean seeds produced both under sole crop and intercrop systems. This study was carried out to investigate the physical, physiological and health qualitie...
Book
Ethiopia, with an agriculturally suitable landmass of 60 million hectares (Thijssen et al., 2008), of which one-fourth is already cultivated, has to make tremendous revolution in the seed industry. For the purpose of clarity we can chronologically highlight the seed system category in three phases: (i) pre-formal seed system (ii) formal seed system...
Chapter
Full-text available
Ethiopia, with an agriculturally suitable landmass of 60 million hectares (Thijssen et al., 2008), of which one-fourth is already cultivated, has to make tremendous revolution in the seed industry. For the purpose of clarity we can chronologically highlight the seed system category in three phases: (i) pre-formal seed system (ii) formal seed system...
Article
Full-text available
In spite of the availability of several improved agricultural technologies generated by the research system in Ethiopia over the last four decades, adoption of these innovations by smallholder farmers has been very low. This has led to stagnation of agricultural productivity and low crop yields, exposing the country to recurrent food shortfalls and...
Article
Full-text available
Assimilate availability and the capacity to utilise them in the reproductive structures to a large extent determine reproductive sink establishment and yield of crops under drought stress. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of drought stress imposed at early pod-fill stage on seed sink strength of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L...
Article
Full-text available
This work analyses on-farm adjustments in land allocation and intensification in a commercial crop following the increases in market demand in a developing economy. Drawing from the survey conducted among common bean producers in Ethiopia in 2008, a two stage econometric method was used to investigate the contribution of market access and other mic...
Article
Full-text available
Sixteen field pea (Pisum sativum L.) genotypes were evaluated using Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications for evaluating agronomic performance, reaction to diseases (downy and powdery mildew and ascochyta blight), genotype x environment interaction (GEI) and yield stability across 12 environments during 2004-2006 at highl...
Article
The selection of cultivars for the predominant cropping systems of small farms in the tropics depends to a large extent on the information obtained by testing their performance across the different systems. The main objective of this experiment was to measure the genotype × cropping system (G × CS) interaction for yield and selected agronomic trait...
Article
Drought stress is a major constraint to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide. Understanding the physiological basis of drought resistance may help to target the key traits that limit yield of the crop under drought situations. The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that I) differences exist in biomass accumulatio...
Article
Genotype x environment interactions, genotype response to environments and stability for seed yield of navy bean genotypes ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were studied. Sixteen genotypes were grown in a randomised complete block design with three replications at four locations in Ethiopia. Genotype x environment (G X E) interactions were analysed using li...
Article
Full-text available
The research summarized in this report systematically assesses the smallholder farmer context and the constraints that hinder common bean productivity improvements in Eastern Kenya and Ethiopia. The research effort established a baseline to: (1) understand the current context of common bean cultivation, and (2) contrast smallholder farming conditio...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
The Tropical Legumes III project (TL-III) is a major international initiative that will develop and deliver seed of improved cultivars of common bean, cowpea, chickpea and groundnut at scale to small-holders, while also fundamentally strengthening four key CGIAR, 7 African and one South Asian partner National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) plant breeding programs to generate increased rates of genetic gain. The TL-III project builds directly upon the outputs and momentum of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Funded Tropical Legumes I and Tropical Legumes II (TL-I and TL-II) projects, but is strategically focused on fewer crops (does not include soybean and pigeonpea as was in TL-II) and fewer geographies (the seven BMGF African focus geographies-Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Uganda; and the Indian State of Uttar Pradesh as opposed to 15 geographies in the TL-II). The TL-III will integrate the genomic resources developed in the TL-I with the applied breeding and seed delivery initiatives of TL-II. The TL-III will put increased emphasis on improving the national breeding and seed delivery programs through a structured improvement process (described below). To ensure the strongest possible gender outcomes, gender targets and supporting activities appropriate to the goals and scope of the project were developed in consultation with the Foundation and the project’s gender specialists. We will harmonize gender training approaches with other initiatives supported by BMGF (e.g. the N2Africa project). As the project will put special emphasis on empowering women farmers by formulating breeding ideotypes that have been informed by women small-holders and by targeted seed and production information outreach efforts. Thus, as the majority of Africa’s and Asia’s legume crop producers and marketers are women, the initiative is expected to have a profound effect on the livelihoods of female farmers and their families. The TL-III, in partnership with other BMGF initiatives noted below, will accomplish the Tropical Legumes original ten-year vision (2007-2018) of achieving a 20% increase in productivity and 10% across the board increase in production in targeted geographies. Given its current trajectory, economists estimate that by 2018 the project itself will provide substantial nutritional, cropping system and economic benefits to more than 3.5 million smallholder farmers. To that end, TL-III scientists will develop at least 50 new legume cultivars and provide effective extension education materials and varietal production packages to more than 500,000 farmers. In all, we anticipate reaching at least 2.5 million smallholder producers with small seed packs and targeted commodity and seed production information. At its conclusion, the project will leave behind crop improvement organizations whose capacity to deliver genetic gains has more than doubled and seed delivery systems capable of sustainably supplying at least 20% of the seed required as well as a cadre of female researchers who can continue to carry out this work with a particular sensitivity to the needs of female small-holders. Through partnerships with other seed system initiatives supported by host countries, BMGF and USAID, we anticipate the extent of reach of project outputs to be in far excess of the 20% project goal in targeted geographies. We believe these objectives to be both realistic and achievable within the four year time span of the project. Three complementary research and delivery components are proposed to deliver these outcomes: 1) Support for the development and release of farmer-preferred varieties in the target crop x geography matrix identified by BMGF. These include cowpea and groundnut in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria; common bean and chickpea in Ethiopia; common bean and groundnut in Uganda and Tanzania; and chickpea in Uttar Pradesh, India; 2) Strengthening of the legume breeding capacity of the partner CGIAR centers (ICRISAT, IITA and CIAT) African hub stations and national partners (henceforth called NARS,) through a formal assessment and improvement process, thus enhancing the capacity of the national systems to deliver improved cultivars beyond the timeframe of the project; and 3) The establishment of sustainable seed delivery systems that service the needs of small-holders, especially underserved women farmers in the African partner geographies. Seed delivery targets have been established for each country as described below.