Sergio Rasmann

Sergio Rasmann
Université de Neuchâtel | UniNE · Institut de biologie (IBIOL)

About

154
Publications
49,165
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5,368
Citations
Citations since 2016
112 Research Items
4144 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220200400600800
20162017201820192020202120220200400600800

Publications

Publications (154)
Preprint
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Background and Aims – To counteract the ongoing worldwide biodiversity loss, conservation actions are required to re-establish and regenerate populations of threatened species. Two key factors predominantly involved in finding the most suitable habitats for endangered plant species are the surrounding plant community composition and the physicochem...
Article
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To withstand the surge of species loss worldwide, (re)introduction of endangered plant species has become an increasingly common technique in conservation biology. Successful (re)introduction plans, however, require identifying sites that provide the optimal ecological conditions for the target species to thrive. In this study, we propose a two‐ste...
Article
Airborne plant communication is a widespread phenomenon in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from damaged plants boost herbivore resistance in neighbouring, undamaged plants. Although this form of plant signalling has been reported in more than 30 plant species, there is still a considerable knowledge gap on how abiotic factors (e.g., water a...
Article
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Deceptive pollination often involves volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that mislead insects into performing non-rewarding pollination. Among deceptively pollinated plants, Arum maculatum is particularly well-known for its potent dung-like VOC emissions and specialized floral chamber, which traps pollinators—mainly Psychoda phalaenoides and...
Article
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Abstract Introduction A wide range of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can be applied to agricultural soils as biofertilizers for increasing crop growth and yield. Current research also shows that AMF can stimulate plant defences against a range of herbivores and pathogens. However, to date, the efficient use of AMF in agriculture is largely impa...
Article
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Understanding the ecological rules structuring the organization of species interactions is a prerequisite to predicting how ecosystems respond to environmental changes. While the ecological determinants of single networks have been documented, it remains unclear whether network ecological rules are conserved along spatial and environmental gradient...
Article
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Soil nematodes are key components of soil food web and, through their metabolic activities, play a crucial role in soil carbon (C) cycling. Aboveground and belowground plant C inputs can directly, or indirectly via soil microbes, modify nematode abundance and community composition. Aboveground and belowground C inputs differ in chemical composition...
Article
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A major aim of ecology is to upscale attributes of individuals to understand processes at population, community and ecosystem scales. Such attributes are typically described using functional traits, that is, standardised characteristics that impact fitness via effects on survival, growth and/or reproduction. However, commonly used functional traits...
Article
• Plant communication via airborne volatile organic compounds is a widespread phenomenon by which volatile organic compounds from damaged plants boost herbivore resistance in receiver plants. This phenomenon has been studied only in a handful of crop species. • We tested for communication between potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants in response to her...
Article
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Ecosystem productivity is largely dependent on soil nutrient cycling which, in turn, is driven by decomposition rates governed by locally adapted below-ground microbial and soil communities. How climate change will impact soil biota and the associated ecosystem functioning, however, remains largely an open question. To address this gap, we first ch...
Article
Alleviating the adverse effects of abiotic and biotic stress factors on crop plants is essential to achieve higher productivity for satisfying the future food demands of the rapidly-growing global human population. The application of Si nanomaterials (Si NMs) could be an ecologically-sound alternative, as there is evidence that Si NMs could positiv...
Article
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Flowering plants emit complex bouquets of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to mediate interactions with their pollinators. These bouquets are undoubtedly influenced by pollinator‐mediated selection, particularly in deceptively‐pollinated species that rely on chemical mimicry. However, many uncertainties remain regarding how spatially and temporall...
Article
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Soil nematodes are a foremost component of terrestrial biodiversity; they display a whole gamut of trophic guilds and life strategies, and by their activity, affect major ecosystem process, such as organic matter degradation and carbon cycling. Based on nematodes' functional types, nematode community indices have been developed, and can be used to...
Article
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Trait‐based ecology has developed fast in the last decades, aiming to both explain mechanisms of community assembly, and predict patterns in nature, such as the effects of biodiversity shifts on key ecosystem processes. This body of work has stimulated the development of several conceptual frameworks and analytical methods, as well as the productio...
Article
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In recent years, metabolomics has emerged as a pivotal approach for the holistic analysis of metabolites in biological systems. The rapid progress in analytical equipment, coupled to the rise of powerful data processing tools, now provides unprecedented opportunities to deepen our understanding of the relationships between biochemical processes and...
Article
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Forest pests can cause massive ecological and economic damage worldwide. Ecologically-sound solutions to diminish forest insect pest impacts include the use of their natural enemies, such as predators and parasitoids, as well as entomopathogenic fungi, bacteria or viruses. Phytochemical compounds mediate most interactions between these organisms, b...
Article
Theory predicts that a large fraction of phytochemical diversity – the richness of individual chemical compounds produced by plants – governs the complexity of interactions between plants and their herbivores. While the effect of specific classes of chemical compounds on plant resistance against herbivores has been largely documented, the effect of...
Article
Silicon, in its nanoscale form, has shown plant-promoting and insecticidal properties. To date, however, we lack mechanistic evidence for how nanoscale silicon influences the regulation of plant chemical defenses against herbivore attacks. To address this gap, we compared the effect of Si nanodots and sodium silicate, a conventional silicate fertil...
Article
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Significance Phytochemical diversity affects plant fitness and is the source of numerous medicines. Despite this, we know remarkably little about how phytochemical diversity is distributed across the plant kingdom and the environment. To address this challenge, we coupled untargeted metabolomics on 416 grassland vascular plant species across Switze...
Article
The use of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) for agricultural applications is becoming increasingly interesting because NMs have been shown to promote crop yield, and also to some extent, protection against insect...
Article
Mountain ecology under climate change Climate warming causes shifts in the distributions of organisms and different organisms may move at different rates, resulting in changes in the composition and functioning of ecological communities. These effects are rarely considered in forecasts about the effects of climate change on biodiversity. Using expe...
Article
Plant communication in response to insect herbivory has been increasingly studied, whereas that involving pathogen attack has received much less attention. We tested for communication between potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants in response to leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. To this end, we measured the total amount and...
Article
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Aim Ecological gradients are expected to be associated with structural rewiring of species interaction networks. The study of network structures along geographic and ecological gradients, however, remains marginal because documenting species interactions at multiple sites is a methodological challenge. Here, we aimed to study the structural variati...
Article
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Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) have been extensively studied as potential biological control agents against root-feeding crop pests. Maize roots under rootworm attack have been shown to release volatile organic compounds, such as (E)-β-caryophyllene (Eβc) that guide EPNs toward the damaging larvae. As yet, it is unknown how belowground ecosystem...
Article
Elevational gradients are useful ecological settings for revealing the biotic and abiotic drivers of plant trait variation and plant–insect interactions. However, most work focusing on plant defences has looked at individual traits and few studies have assessed multiple traits simultaneously, their correlated expression patterns, and abiotic factor...
Article
The molecular and physiological mechanisms of how rare earth oxide nanoparticles (NPs) alter radish (Raphanus sativus L.) taproot formation and cracking were investigated in the present study. We compared plants that received suspensions of 10, 50, 100, 300 mg L⁻¹ of La2O3 NPs, 300 m L⁻¹ La2O3 bulk-particles (BPs), 0.8 m L⁻¹ La³⁺, or only water for...
Article
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Above- and below-ground herbivory are key ecosystem processes that can be substantially altered by environmental changes. However, direct comparisons of the coupled variations of above- and below-ground herbivore communities along elevation gradients remain sparse. Here, we studied the variation in assemblages of two dominant groups of herbivores,...
Preprint
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Floral odor is a complex trait that mediates many biotic interactions, including pollination. While high intraspecific floral odor variation appears to be common, the ecological and evolutionary drivers of this variation are often unclear. Here, we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally heterogeneous pollinator communities on floral...
Article
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Biologists still strive to identify the ecological and evolutionary drivers of phytochemical variation that mediate biotic interactions. We hypothesized that plant species growing at sites characterized by high herbivore pressure would converge to produce highly toxic blends of secondary metabolites, independent of phylogenetic constraints. To addr...
Article
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Ecotypic differences in plant growth and anti‐herbivore defence phenotypes are determined by the complex interactions between the abiotic and the biotic environment. Root‐associated microbes (RAMs) are pervasive in nature, vary over climatic gradients, and have been shown to influence the expression of multiple plant functional traits related to bi...
Article
• Deciphering patterns in species distributions and species interactions along ecological gradients are fundamental topics in ecology. Theory holds that species diversity is greater and interactions are stronger under warmer and more stable environments, such as low elevations and latitudes. However, recent findings have shown conflicting evidence,...
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As the most abundant animals on earth, nematodes are a dominant component of the soil community. They play critical roles in regulating biogeochemical cycles and vegetation dynamics within and across landscapes and are an indicator of soil biological activity. Here, we present a comprehensive global dataset of soil nematode abundance and functional...
Article
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Plants defend themselves against herbivore attack by constitutively producing toxic secondary metabolites, as well as by inducing them in response to herbivore feeding. Induction of secondary metabolites can cross plant tissue boundaries, such as from root to shoot. However, whether the potential for plants to systemically induce secondary metaboli...
Article
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The successful conservation plans of megaherbivores necessitate precisely characterizing their ecological needs in order to optimize reproduction rates and reintroduction plans. The black rhino (Diceros bicornis L.) is among the most endangered species of megaherbivores in Africa and its conservation relies on nature reserves that are bound and hab...
Article
1.Plant species allocate resources to multiple defensive traits simultaneously, which often leads to so‐called defence syndromes, i.e. suites of traits that are co‐expressed. While reports of ontogenetic variation in plant defences are commonplace, no research to date has tested for ontogenetic shifts in defence syndromes. In addition, we still kno...
Article
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One major goal in plant evolutionary ecology is to address how and why tritrophic interactions mediated by phytochemical plant defences vary across species, space, and time. In this study, we tested three classical hypotheses about plant defences: (i) the resource-availability hypothesis, (ii) the altitudinal/elevational gradient hypothesis and (ii...
Article
Plants indirectly mediate above-belowground interactions between root- and shoot- herbivores via changes in primary and secondary metabolism. Such effects can cascade up to affect higher trophic level organisms such as predators, however, to what extent predators can in turn influence plant-mediated above-belowground interactions needs to be furthe...
Article
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A vast body of research demonstrates that many ecological and evolutionary processes can only be understood from a tri‐trophic viewpoint, that is, one that moves beyond the pairwise interactions of neighbouring trophic levels to consider the emergent features of interactions among multiple trophic levels. Despite its unifying potential, tri‐trophic...
Article
Premise: Herbivory is predicted to increase toward warmer and more stable climates found at lower elevations, and this increase should select for higher plant defenses. Still, a number of recent studies have reported either no evidence of such gradients or reverse patterns. One source of inconsistency may be that plant ontogenetic variation is usu...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plants defend themselves against herbivore attack by constitutively producing toxic secondary metabolites, as well as by inducing them during herbivore feeding. Induction of secondary metabolites can cross plant tissue boundaries, such as from root to shoot. However, whether the potential for plants to systemically induce secondary metabolites from...
Article
1. Plants protect themselves against herbivore attacks with physical traits and toxic secondary metabolites. Levels of plant defences and herbivore performance might shift under climate warming, particularly in alpine habitats, where herbivore pressure is currently low. Plant responses to warming should be driven by species‐specific shifts in physi...
Article
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Soil organisms are a crucial part of the terrestrial biosphere. Despite their importance for ecosystem functioning, few quantitative, spatially explicit models of the active belowground community currently exist. In particular, nematodes are the most abundant animals on Earth, filling all trophic levels in the soil food web. Here we use 6,759 geore...
Article
Nitrogen (N) cycling by soil microbes can be estimated by quantifying the abundance of microbial functional genes (MFG) involved in N-transformation processes. In agro-ecosystems, biochars are regularly applied for increasing soil fertility and stability. In turn, it has been shown that biochar amendment can alter soil N cycling by altering MFG abu...
Poster
Environmental clines represent a natural laboratory to explore how species interactions respond to environmental changes, but comparing ecological networks along natural gradients remains a minority of network studies. Using the plant–orthoptera study system, we aim at identifying variations of structural properties for bipartite networks along the...
Article
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Although the production of phytohormones has been commonly associated with production of plant defence and stress-related traits, few studies have simultaneously investigated this phenomenon across several plant species that grow along large-scale ecological gradients. To address these knowledge gaps, we performed a common garden experiment with si...
Article
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Street greeneries and other green spaces within the urban matrix can potentially reduce air pollution and increase urban biodiversity. Yet, these services can be negatively affected by anthropogenic stress factors. In the boreo-nemoral zone, large amounts of salts are spread each year for deicing the pavement. To address the effect of deicing salt...
Article
1.How plant traits evolve along geographical and climatic gradients has recently received increased attention because of anticipated climate change and associated shifts in insect distribution, whether they are herbivores or predators. This issue is particularly relevant for traits related to growth and anti‐herbivore defence of plants, because bot...
Article
The strengths of interactions between plants, herbivores, and predators are predicted to relax with elevation. Despite the fundamental role predators play in tritrophic interactions, high-resolution experimental evidence describing predation across habitat gradients is still scarce in the literature and varies by predator. With this opinion paper,...
Article
Elevational gradients have been highly useful for understanding the underlying forces driving variation in plant traits and plant-insect herbivore interactions. A widely held view from these studies has been that greater herbivory under warmer and less variable climatic conditions found at low elevations has resulted in stronger herbivore selection...
Article
Full-text available
Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi favor plant growth by improving nutrient acquisition, but also by increasing their resistance against abiotic and biotic stressors, including herbivory. Mechanisms of AM fungal mediated increased resistance include a direct effect of AM fungi on plant vigor, but also a manipulation of the hormonal cascades, such as...
Article
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Long‐standing theory predicts herbivores and predators should drive selection for increased plant defences, such as the specific production of volatile organic compounds for attracting predators near the site of damage. Along elevation gradients, a general pattern is that herbivores and predators are abundant at low elevation and progressively dimi...
Article
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Understanding the evolutionary dynamics underlying herbivorous insect mega‐diversity requires investigating the ability of insects to shift and adapt to different host plants. Feeding experiments with nine related stick insect species revealed that insects retain the ability to use ancestral host plants after shifting to novel hosts, with host plan...
Article
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Along ecological gradients, phenotypic differentiation can arise through natural selection on trait diversity and magnitude, and environment‐driven plastic changes. The magnitude of ecotypic differentiation versus phenotypic plasticity can vary depending on the traits under study. Using reciprocal transplant‐common gardens along steep elevation gra...
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Soil-dwelling entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) kill arthropod hosts by injecting their symbiotic bacteria into the host hemolymph and feed on the bacteria and the tissue of the dying host for several generations cycles until the arthropod cadaver is completely depleted. The EPN–bacteria–arthropod cadaver complex represents a rich energy source for...
Data
Fig. S1. Overview of the experimental design for measuring the impact of EPNs‐associated bacteria on entomopathogenic fungi and plant pathogenic fungi. Fig. S2. Experimental design for testing the antifungal effects of EPB metabolites against PPF on cherry tomatoes fruits. Fig. S3. In vitro inhibition of EPF growth on G. mellonella larvae by EPB...