Sergi López-Torres

Sergi López-Torres
University of Warsaw | UW · Institute of Evolutionary Biology

Ph.D.

About

30
Publications
26,710
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193
Citations
Introduction
My research focuses on the phylogeny, taxonomy, functional morphology, and paleoecology of primitive members of Euarchontoglires.
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - August 2020
American Museum of Natural History
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2019 - present
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • Adiunkt
July 2017 - June 2019
Polish Academy of Sciences
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2011 - August 2017
University of Toronto
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
September 2009 - September 2010
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Primatology
September 2004 - June 2009
University of Barcelona
Field of study
  • Organisms and Systems Biology

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Early lagomorphs are central to our understanding of how the brain evolved in Glires (rodents, lagomorphs and their kin) from basal members of Euarch-ontoglires (Glires + Euarchonta, the latter grouping primates, treeshrews, and colugos). Here, we report the first virtual endocast of the fossil lagomorph Megalagus turgidus, from the Orella Member o...
Article
Full-text available
Anagalidae are extinct primitive Euarchontoglires from Asia, regarded as relatively closely related to basal Glires. So far, the group has been reported only from China and stratigraphically spans from the early Paleocene to the latest Eocene/earliest Oligocene. Anagalids are characterized by a relatively full dental formula featuring slightly enla...
Article
Full-text available
Darwinius is an adapoid primate from the Eocene of Germany, and its only known specimen represents the most complete fossil primate ever found. Its describers hypothesized a close relationship to Anthropoidea, and using a Saimiri model estimated its age at death. This study reconstructs the ancestral permanent dental eruption sequences for basal Eu...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous factors have stimulated new enthusiasm for understanding the process of primate origins, including new fossil discoveries, improvements to methods for analyzing molecular data, and technological advances. These novel approaches have led to a better appreciation of the complexities of early primate evolution. Eight fundamental questions pro...
Article
Full-text available
Very shortly after the disappearance of the non-avian dinosaurs, the first mammals that had features similar to those of primates started appearing. These first primitive forms went on to spawn a rich diversity of plesiadapiforms, often referred to as archaic primates. Like many living primates, plesiadapiforms were small arboreal animals that gene...
Article
Flying squirrels (Sciurinae, Pteromyini) are the most successful group of gliding mammals. However, their fossil record mostly consists of isolated dental remains that provide very limited insights into their palaeobiology and evolution. The first skeleton of a fossil flying squirrel, belonging to the species Miopetaurista neogrivensis, has been de...
Chapter
This is the latest edition. This only covers Chapter 24 "Primate evolution and the emergence of humans". For the full textbook, please visit: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/vertebrate-life-9780197564882?facet_narrowbybinding_facet=Looseleaf&lang=en&cc=us
Article
Full-text available
Due to their global distribution, invasive history, and unique characteristics, European rabbits are recognizable almost anywhere on our planet. Although they are members of a much larger group of living and extinct mammals [Mammalia, Lagomorpha (rabbits, hares, and pikas)], the group is often characterized by several well-known genera (e.g., Oryct...
Article
Full-text available
Ischyromyids are a group of large rodents with the earliest fossil record known from the late Paleocene (Clarkforkian) of North America; they are considered the earliest fossil representatives of Rodentia of modern aspect. Ischyromyids dominated early Paleogene small-mammal assemblages of North America and in the latest Paleocene migrated to wester...
Article
Full-text available
Gummivory poses unique challenges to the dentition as gum acquisition may often require that the anterior teeth be adapted to retain a sharp edge and to resist loading because they sometimes must penetrate a highly obdurate substrate during gum extraction by means of gouging or scraping. It has been observed previously that the enamel on the labial...
Chapter
Full-text available
Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
Chapter
Full-text available
Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
Chapter
Full-text available
Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos - edited by K. A. I. Nekaris March 2020
Article
Full-text available
Molar morphology plays a key role in the systematics and behavioral interpretation of fossil taxa, so understanding the developmental patterns that shape occlusal morphology in modern taxa is of central importance to informing analysis of the fossil record. The shape of the outer enamel surface (OES) of a tooth is largely the result of the forming...
Chapter
Full-text available
This is an old edition. For the latest edition, see 11th ed. This only covers Chapter 26 "Primate evolution and the emergence of humans". For the full textbook, please visit: https://global.oup.com/ushe/product/vertebrate-life-9781605356075?lang=en&cc=pl
Article
Full-text available
Paromomyidae has been thought to represent the longest-lived group of stem primates (plesiadapiforms), extending from the early Paleocene to late Eocene. We analyzed primate material from the late-middle Eocene of southern California that had initially been ascribed to cf. Phenacolemur shifrae. This material falls at the lowest end of the size rang...
Article
Full-text available
Plesiadapiforms represent the first radiation of Primates, appearing near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Eleven families of plesiadapiforms are recognized, including the Paromomyidae. Four species of paromomyids from the early Eocene have been reported from Europe: Arcius fuscus Russell et al., 1967, Arcius lapparenti Russell et al., 1967, and...
Article
Full-text available
Plesiadapiforms, appearing near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, represent the first primate radiation and show a diverse array of tooth morphologies. Dental topographic metrics provide quantitative data on occlusal surface shape. We used three metrics, Dirichlet Normal Energy, Relief Index, and 3D Orientation Patch Count Rotated, to assess chang...
Article
Full-text available
Dental topographic metrics provide quantitative, biologically meaningful data on the threedimensional (3D) form of teeth. In this study, three dental topographic metrics (Dirichlet normal energy (DNE), relief index (RFI), and orientation patch count rotated (OPCR)) are used to evaluate the presence of dietary niche overlap between North American pl...
Data
Full-text available
Figure S2: Phylogenetic relationships of the 97 taxa (extant and extinct) used in this analysis. Branch numbers correspond to Table S4, which provides the reference for each branch length.
Data
Supplementary tables and text: - Table S1. Character matrix used for the ancestral state reconstruction analysis. - Table S2. Ancestral state reconstruction for five ancestral nodes (Euprimates, stem Strepsirrhini, crown Strepsirrhini, Haplorhini, and Anthropoidea) and 14 characters, including fossil data. - Table S3. Ancestral state reconstruction...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The origin of Primates represents the first clear step in the divergence of humans from the rest of Mammalia, yet our understanding of this important period in evolutionary history remains limited. The systematic relationships of Paleocene–Eocene plesiadapiforms, which have been considered the ancestors of either Euprimates (primates of “modern aspect” or crown-clade primates) or of Dermoptera continue to be debated. Clarifying the position of plesiadapiforms is central to understanding the broader relationships among euarchontan mammals (Primates, Scandentia, Dermoptera), and to testing adaptive hypotheses of primate origins by using direct evidence from the fossil record.