Seraina Lisa Cappelli

Seraina Lisa Cappelli
University of Zurich | UZH · Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies

PhD
Post doc studying plant diseases in a community context.

About

15
Publications
5,122
Reads
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59
Citations
Introduction
I am a community ecologist interested in pathogens of plant communities and how interactions between the plant communities and their pathogens affect ecosystem functioning. Current project: https://carbonaction.org/twinwin-project/ PhD project: https://allanecology.com/projects/pandiv/ ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8141-404X contact: seraina.cappelli[at]helsinki.fi
Additional affiliations
February 2014 - May 2015
Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • Internship and Master thesis about Red Wood Ants in the Swiss National Park.
February 2013 - May 2013
ETH Zurich
Position
  • Laboratory Assistant
Description
  • tend Mamestra brassicae, set up experiments (food choice, plant choice for egg deposition, ...), data collection
Education
September 2015 - January 2020
Universität Bern
Field of study
  • Community Ecology
September 2012 - February 2015
ETH Zurich
Field of study
  • Environmental sciences: Ecology & Evolution
September 2009 - June 2012
ETH Zurich
Field of study
  • Environmental sciences

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Aboveground fungal pathogens can substantially reduce biomass production in grasslands. However, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the drivers of fungal pathogen infection and impact. Using a grassland global change and biodiversity experiment we show that the trade‐off between plant growth and defense is the main determinant of infection inci...
Preprint
Invertebrate herbivores are important and diverse, and their abundance and impacts are expected to undergo unprecedented shifts under climate change. Yet, past studies of invertebrate herbivory have documented a wide variety of responses to changing temperature, making it challenging to predict the direction and magnitude of these shifts. One expla...
Article
Full-text available
While the positive relationship between plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) is well established, the extent to which this is mediated via belowground microbial processes is poorly understood. Growing evidence suggests that plant community structure influences soil microbial diversity, which in turn promotes functions desired for sust...
Article
Full-text available
Biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning can be partitioned into complementarity effects, driven by many species, and selection effects, driven by few. Selection effects occur through interspecific abundance shifts (dominance) and intraspecific shifts in functioning. Complementarity and selection effects are often calculated for biomass, but v...
Article
Full-text available
Our results add to a growing body of literature showing large intraspecific trait variation and emphasise the importance of using field collected data to determine community functional composition. However, they also show that intraspecific variation does not necessarily affect ecosystem functioning and therefore response–effect trait relationships...
Article
Full-text available
Many experiments have shown that biodiversity promotes ecosystem functioning and stability and that this relationship varies with resource availability. However, we still have a poor understanding of the underlying physiological and ecological mechanisms driving diversity effects and how they may interact with soil nutrient availability. We collect...
Article
Full-text available
This article is a Commentary on Liu et al. (2021), 232: 345–355.
Preprint
While the positive relationship between plant biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) is relatively well-established, far less in known about the extent to which this relationship is mediated via below-ground microbial responses to plant diversity. Limited evidence suggests that the diversity of soil microbial communities is sensitive to plant...
Preprint
Full-text available
Plant functional traits can provide a more mechanistic understanding of community responses to global change and effects on ecosystem functions. In particular, nitrogen enrichment shifts trait composition by promoting dominance of fast growing, acquisitive plants (with high specific leaf area [SLA] and low leaf dry matter content [LDMC]), and such...
Preprint
Full-text available
The ability of an ecosystem to deliver multiple functions at high levels (multifunctionality) typically increases with biodiversity but there is substantial variation in the strength and direction of biodiversity effects, suggesting context-dependency. However, the drivers of this context dependency have not been identified and understood in compar...
Article
Nitrogen (N) enrichment has direct effects on ecosystem functioning by altering soil abiotic conditions and indirect effects by reducing plant diversity and shifting plant functional composition from dominance by slow to fast growing species. Litter decomposition is a key ecosystem function and is affected by N enrichment either by a change in litt...
Preprint
Full-text available
Aboveground fungal pathogens can substantially reduce biomass production in grasslands. However, we lack a mechanistic understanding of the drivers of fungal infection and impact. Using a global change biodiversity experiment we show that the trade-off between plant growth and defense is the main determinant of fungal infection in grasslands. Nitro...
Preprint
Full-text available
Nitrogen (N) enrichment has direct effects on ecosystem functioning by altering soil abiotic conditions and indirect effects by reducing plant diversity and shifting plant functional composition from dominance by slow to fast growing species. Litter decomposition is a key ecosystem function and is affected by N enrichment either by a change in litt...
Research
Full-text available
Red wood ants (RWA) are known to climb trees for hunting and honeydew collection. They do not visit all the trees and their preferences for certain trees can change over time. The question to be answered is: “What makes a tree attractive to RWA?” I assessed tree use of RWA (F. lugubris and F. paralugubris) in a natural mixed coniferous forest in th...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
We have set up a large field experiment in Münchenbuchsee near Bern to investigate the mechanisms by which nitrogen enrichment affects ecosystem functioning. N enrichment changes soil chemistry and directly increases plant growth and ecosystem productivity. At the same time, it could indirectly affect ecosystem function by causing a loss of plant species richness, a shift in functional trait composition towards fast growing plant species and an increase in the abundance of plant enemies such as foliar fungal pathogens. This experiment factorially manipulates N addition, plant species richness, functional composition (two pools of fast and slow growing species defined based on leaf economic traits) and fungal pathogens (using fungicide) on 336 2m x 2m plots, which were sown in autumn 2015. We will measure a range of ecosystem functions related to productivity, biogeochemical cycling and litter decomposition and will monitor the diversity and abundance of the foliar pathogen communities.