Sebastiano De Bona

Sebastiano De Bona
University of Jyväskylä | JYU ·  Department of Biological and Environmental Science

PhD

About

15
Publications
2,870
Reads
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149
Citations
Additional affiliations
September 2012 - September 2014
University of Padova
Position
  • Master's Student
Education
September 2012 - September 2014
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Evolutionary Biology - Laurea Magistrale (MSc)
September 2009 - September 2012
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Biology - Laurea Triennale (BSc)

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Invasive pest establishment is a pervasive threat to global ecosystems, agriculture, and public health. The recent establishment of the invasive spotted lanternfly in the northeastern United States has proven devastating to farms and vineyards, necessitating urgent development of population dynamical models and effective control practices. In this...
Preprint
Full-text available
1. Control of incipient invaders, established invasive species in the early stages of spreading, can be inhibited by incomplete knowledge of the species' habitat use. By identifying consistent habitat associations for incipient invaders early, control efforts can be more effective. Yet, because habitat associations are the result of multiscale proc...
Article
Full-text available
How and when deimatic behaviours are performed can change during encounters between predators and prey. Some predators attack repeatedly, investigating and manipulating prey, and in response, an individual’s deimatic behaviour may intensify or may diminish in favour of escaping. The presence of a resource can further force a trade-off between displ...
Article
Full-text available
Much of our understanding of natural invasions is retrospective, based on data acquired after invaders become established. As a consequence, we know little about the characteristics of the early population growth and habitat use of the invaders during establishment. Here we report on experimental introductions of guppies into natural streams in whi...
Article
Full-text available
The defensive repertoires of prey are shaped by diverse ecological and evolutionary demands. This can generate trade-offs between the components of defences, as in the classic ‘fight or flight’ dichotomy, or dedicated investment in a singular end, allowing individuals in better condition to mount a more effective defence all round. Further, sexual...
Article
Full-text available
Predicting population colonisations requires understanding how spatio‐temporal changes in density affect dispersal. Density can inform on fitness prospects, acting as a cue for either habitat quality, or competition over resources. However, when escaping competition, high local density should only increase emigration if lower‐density patches are av...
Article
Full-text available
Predation has driven the evolution of diverse adaptations for defence among prey, and one striking example is the deimatic display. While such displays can resemble, or indeed co-occur with, aposematic ‘warning’ signals, theory suggests deimatic displays may function independently of predator learning. The survival value of deimatic displays agains...
Article
Full-text available
Deimatic or 'startle' displays cause a receiver to recoil reflexively in response to a sudden change in sensory input. Deimatism is sometimes implicitly treated as a form of aposematism (unprofitability associated with a signal). However, the fundamental difference is, in order to provide protection, deimatism does not require a predator to have an...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral data are notable for presenting challenges to their statistical analysis, often due to the difficulties in measuring behavior on a quantitative scale. Instead, a range of qualitative alternative responses is recorded. These can often be understood as the outcome of a sequence of binary decisions. For example, faced by a predator, an indi...
Article
Full-text available
Large conspicuous eyespots on butterfly wings have been shown to deter predators. This has been traditionally explained by mimicry of vertebrate eyes, but recently the classic eye-mimicry hypothesis has been challenged. It is proposed that the conspicuousness of the eyespot, not mimicry, is what causes aversion due to sensory biases, neophobia or s...

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