Sean B. Reilly

Sean B. Reilly
University of California, Santa Cruz | UCSC · Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

PhD

About

30
Publications
17,084
Reads
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286
Citations
Introduction
I'm currently a lecturer at the University of California, Santa Cruz. My research is focused on the biogeography of reptiles and amphibians from the Lesser Sunda Islands of Indonesia, and the evolution and conservation of salamanders from California.
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - May 2017
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • Lecturer
March 2016 - June 2016
University of California, Santa Cruz
Position
  • Lecturer
January 2016 - May 2016
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, UC Berkeley
Position
  • Curatorial Assistant - Herpetology
Education
August 2009 - December 2016
University of California, Berkeley
Field of study
  • Integrative Biology
August 2007 - June 2009
Humboldt State University
Field of study
  • Biology
September 1999 - March 2004

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
We present a taxonomic revision of the black salamander (Aneides flavipunctatus) complex of northwestern California and extreme southeastern Oregon. The revision is based on a number of published works as well as new molecular and morphological data presented herein. The subspecies Aneides flavipunctatus niger Myers & Maslin 1948 is raised in rank...
Article
Full-text available
The Lesser Sunda Archipelago offers exceptional potential as a model system for studying the dynamics of dispersal-driven diversification. The geographic proximity of the islands suggests the possibility for successful dispersal, but this is countered by the permanence of the marine barriers and extreme intervening currents that are expected to hin...
Article
Full-text available
Frogs in the family Ranidae are diverse in Asia and are thought to have dispersed to the Sahul Shelf approximately 10 million years ago, where they radiated into more than a dozen species. Ranid species in the intervening oceanic islands of Wallacea, such as Hylarana florensis and H. elberti from the Lesser Sundas and H. moluccana from eastern Wall...
Article
The archipelagos of Wallacea extend between the Sunda and Sahul Shelves, serving as a semi‐permeable two‐way filter influencing faunal exchange between Asia and Australo‐Papua. Forest skinks (Genus Sphenomorphus) are widespread throughout southern Wallacea and exhibit complex clinal, ontogenetic, sexual, and seasonal morphological variation renderi...
Article
Full-text available
Herein, we report an observation of a Sceloporus occidentalis (Western Fence Lizard) deliberately consuming a flower.
Article
Full-text available
The Lesser Sunda Archipelago consists of hundreds of oceanic islands located in southern Wallacea. The Sunda ratsnake, Coelognathus subradiatus, is endemic to the Lesser Sundas and is found on most of the major islands. Mitochondrial DNA was sequenced from snakes representing five of the major islands revealing that levels of sequence divergence be...
Article
Full-text available
The ring species Ensatina represents a classic example of locally adapted lineages. The Monterey ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii eschscholtzii) is a cryptic subspecies with brown coloration, although a recently discovered polymorphic population within a wind-blown sand region also contains leucistic (pink) and xanthistic (orange) morphs. In the pr...
Article
Full-text available
The Lesser Sundas Archipelago is comprised of two parallel chains of islands that extend between the Asian continental shelf (Sundaland) and Australo‐Papuan continental shelf (Sahul). These islands have served as stepping stones for taxa dispersing between the Asian and Australo‐Papuan biogeographical realms. While the oceanic barriers have prevent...
Article
Full-text available
The importance of long-distance dispersal (LDD) in shaping geographical distributions has been debated since the nineteenth century. In terrestrial vertebrates, LDD events across large water bodies are considered highly improbable, but organismal traits affecting dispersal capacity are generally not taken into account. Here, we focus on a recent li...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: The Lesser Sunda Islands are situated between the Sunda and Sahul Shelves, with a linear arrangement that has functioned as a two-way filter for taxa dispersing between the Asian and Australo-Papuan biogeographical realms. Distributional patterns of many terrestrial vertebrates suggest a stepping-stone model of island colonization. Here we inv...
Article
Full-text available
In 2011 and 2014, we conducted two expeditions to four islands in the Kei Island group in Maluku Province of eastern Indonesia. We documented and collected 33 species of lizards, snakes, and frogs, and after reviewing historical occurrences in the island group, we accounted for a total of 39 species present in the Kei Islands (26 lizards, 10 snakes...
Article
Full-text available
We used Massively Parallel High-Throughput Sequencing to obtain genetic data from a 145-year old holotype specimen of the flying lizard, Draco cristatellus . Obtaining genetic data from this holotype was necessary to resolve an otherwise intractable taxonomic problem involving the status of this species relative to closely related sympatric Draco s...
Data
ND2 sequence data for members of the Draco fimbriatus group plus 13 mitochondrial sequence reads obtained from the D. cristatellus holotype This file includes ND2 sequence data obtained via traditional Sanger sequencing for 39 individuals representing Draco cristatellus, D. fimbriatus, D. hennigi, D. punctatus, and D. maculatus, plus 183 base pairs...
Article
Full-text available
Lepidodactylus pantai is a new species of gecko from the Kei Islands, Maluku, Indonesia that is closely associated with intertidal habitats. This species does not fit cleanly into any of the three species groups described for the genus because it possesses the unique combination of both divided terminal scansors on all toes and a nearly completely...
Article
Full-text available
Invasions of poisonous species can cause rapid population declines among native fauna because predators are naïve and often vulnerable to these toxins. The recent invasion of Madagascar by the poisonous Asian common toad, Duttaphrynus melanostictus, has sparked international attention (Kolby, 2015), as well as research and conservation efforts to p...
Article
Full-text available
Background Phylogeography is an important tool that can be used to reveal cryptic biodiversity and to better understand the processes that promote lineage diversification. We studied the phylogeographic history of the Arboreal Salamander (Aneides lugubris), a wide-ranging species endemic to the California floristic province. We used multi-locus dat...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: Phylogeographical structure in the black salamander (Aneides flavipunctatus) was inferred using two independent genetic datasets. Concordance between the datasets was sought in order to evaluate earlier suggestions of species-level breaks and evidence of vicariance and long-term isolation within the complex. We hypothesized that major phylogeo...
Article
Full-text available
A newly discovered population of Red-bellied Newts (Taricha rivularis) in the Stevens Creek watershed in Santa Clara County, California, represents a significant southerly range extension of this species, by approximately 130 km from the nearest records in Sonoma County, California. To investigate the origin of this population we sequenced two mito...
Article
Full-text available
Here we characterize the genetic structure of Black Salamanders (Aneides flavipunctatus) in the Klamath Mountains of northwestern California and southwestern Oregon using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences. We hypothesized that the Sacramento, Smith, Klamath, and Rogue River watersheds would represent distinct genetic populations based on prio...
Article
Full-text available
The accurate delimitation of evolutionary population units represents an important component in phylogeographic and conservation genetic studies. Here, we used a combined population assignment and historical demographic approach to study a complex of ecomorphologically distinctive populations of Black Salamanders (Aneides flavipunctatus) that are p...
Article
Full-text available
Given the current global amphibian decline, it is crucial to obtain accurate and current information regarding species distributions. Secretive amphibians such as plethodontid salamanders can be difficult to detect in many cases, especially in remote, high elevation areas. We used molecular phylogenetic analyses to identify three partially digested...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
To better understand the historical processes that have shaped the diversity and distribution of salamanders in California.
Project
To better understand the timing and sequence of Wallacean island colonization by amphibians and reptiles. These studies can then shed light on the true diversity of Wallacean herpetofauna, as well as the geological history of the region.