Sean Mcauliffe

Sean Mcauliffe
Qatar University · Department of Health Sciences

PhD BSc Physiotherapy

About

37
Publications
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649
Citations

Publications

Publications (37)
Article
Objective: To identify and describe the psychological and psychosocial constructs and outcome measures used in tendinopathy research. Design: Scoping review. Literature search: We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, PEDro, CINAHL, and APA PsychNet databases on July 10, 2021, for all published studies of tendinopathy population...
Article
Objective To report how wearable sensors have been used to identify between-limb deficits during functional tasks following ACL reconstruction and critically examine the methods used. Methods We performed a scoping review of studies including participants with ACL reconstruction as the primary surgical procedure, who were assessed using wearable s...
Article
Analysing the isokinetic curve is important following ACL reconstruction as there may be deficits in torque production at specific points throughout the range of motion. We examined isokinetic (60°.s-1) torque-angle characteristics in 27 male soccer players (24.5 ± 3.9 years) at 3 time-points (17 ± 5; 25 ± 6; and 34 ± 7 weeks post-surgery). Extract...
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Background Cam morphology, a distinct bony morphology of the hip, is prevalent in many athletes, and a risk factor for hip-related pain and osteoarthritis. Secondary cam morphology, due to existing or previous hip disease (eg, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease), is well-described. Cam morphology not clearly associated with a disease is a challenging conce...
Article
Objectives We included objective measures of gait and functional assessments to examine their associations in athletes who had recently commenced running after ACL reconstruction. Design Cross-sectional Setting Sports medicine Participants 65 male athletes with a history of ACL reconstruction Main outcome measures Time from surgery, isokinetic...
Article
In late 2019, a previously unknown coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (the coronavirus that causes COVID-19), was reported in Wuhan, China. Similar to the polio virus epidemic, the fear, uncertainty, and collective response associated with COVID-19 have disrupted daily life on a global scale. In this editorial, we argue that it is time for musculoskeletal phy...
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Context Arbitrary asymmetry thresholds are regularly used in professional soccer athletes, notwithstanding the sparse literature available to examine their prevalence. Objective To establish normative and positional asymmetry values for commonly used screening tests and investigate their relationships with jumping performance. Design Cross-sectio...
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Objective Tendinopathy is often a disabling, and persistent musculoskeletal disorder. Psychological factors appear to play a role in the perpetuation of symptoms and influence recovery in musculoskeletal pain. To date, the impact of psychological factors on clinical outcome in tendinopathy remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of this systematic...
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Objective To evaluate the reporting of eligibility criteria and baseline participant characteristics in randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of exercise interventions in tendinopathy. Methods Randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of exercise therapy compared to a non-exercising intervention in upper and lower lim...
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Context: Deficits in plyometric abilities are common following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Vertical rebound tasks may provide a targeted evaluation of knee function. Objective: Examine the utility of a vertical hop test to assess function following ACLR and establish factors associated with performance. Design: Cross-sectional...
Article
Context: Deficits in plyometric abilities are common following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Vertical rebound tasks may provide a targeted evaluation of knee function. Objective: Examine the utility of a vertical hop test to assess function following ACLR and establish factors associated with performance. Design: Cross-sect...
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Background/aim There is a lack of consistency in return to sport (RTS) assessments, in particular hop tests to predict who will sustain a reinjury following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Inconsistent test battery content and methodological heterogeneity might contribute to variable associations between hop test performance and su...
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Background Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is a common and often persistent musculoskeletal disorder affecting both athletic and non-athletic populations. Despite the relatively high incidence there is little insight into the impact and perceptions of tendinopathy from the individual’s perspective. Increased awareness of the impact and perceptions aroun...
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Background Residual between-limb deficits are a possible contributing factor to poor outcomes in athletic populations after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Comprehensive appraisals of movement strategies utilized by athletes at key clinical milestones during rehabilitation are warranted. Purpose To examine kinetic parameters reco...
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Background: The absence of any agreed-upon tendon health-related domains hampers advances in clinical tendinopathy research. This void means that researchers report a very wide range of outcome measures inconsistently. As a result, substantial synthesis/meta-analysis of tendon research findings is almost futile despite researchers publishing busil...
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We aimed to establish consensus for reporting recommendations relating to participant characteristics in tendon research. A scoping literature review of tendinopathy studies (Achilles, patellar, hamstring, gluteal and elbow) was followed by an online survey and face-to-face consensus meeting with expert healthcare professionals (HCPs) at the Intern...
Article
Background: Persistent strength deficits secondary to Achilles tendinopathy (AT) have been postulated to account for difficulty engaging in tendon-loading movements, such as running and jumping, and may contribute to the increased risk of recurrence. To date, little consensus exists on the presence of strength deficits in AT. Consequently, researc...
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Physical characteristics in professional soccer differ between competition levels and playing positions, and normative data aid practitioners in profiling their players to optimize performance and reduce injury risk. Given the paucity of research in Arabic soccer populations, the purpose of this study was to provide position-specific normative valu...
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ABSTRACT Objectives: Persistent poor sleep is associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Sleep is considered the main method of recovery in athletes; however, studies report that a significant number of athletes are getting insufficient sleep. The purpose of this study was to assess the sleep profiles of elite Gaelic athletes and to compar...
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Background: Achilles tendinopathy (AT) is associated with persistent pain leading to a significant physical and psychological burden. Psychosocial factors are considered to be important mediators following exercise interventions. Despite the recognition of the importance of psychosocial variables in persistent MSK disorders, there is a distinct la...
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Background Ultrasound [US] imaging is commonly used to visualise tendon structure. It is not clear whether the presence of structural abnormalities in asymptomatic tendons predicts the development of future tendon symptoms in the Achilles or patellar tendon. This led to considerable uncertainty in the management of sporting populations with a high...
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Background: Diagnostic ultrasound (US) is a commonly used imaging modality for visualising tendon pathology and morphology. In comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnostic US is perceived to have a higher risk of error when evaluating tendon size. Aim: To systematically assess the evidence regarding the Intra rater and Inter rater...
Article
Background Ultrasound (US) imaging is commonly used to visualise tendon structure. It is not clear whether the presence of structural abnormalities in asymptomatic tendons predicts the development of future tendon symptoms in the Achilles or patellar tendon. Aim To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the ability of US imagi...
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Pathological tendons are known to increase their AP diameter. Ultrasound is an important complementary technique to MRI for assessment of musculoskeletal disorders. Although systematic reviews have confirmed its reliability for the measurement of muscle thickness, no such reviews exist to examine the reliability of US measures of tendon dimensions....
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Full-text available
Background Reduced flexibility has been documented in athletes with lower limb injury, however stretching has limited evidence of effectiveness in preventing injury or reducing the risk of recurrence. In contrast, it has been proposed that eccentric training can not only improve strength and reduce the risk of injury, but also facilitate increased...
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Full-text available
BACKGROUND: Reduced strength and flexibility are commonly hypothesised risk factors for the development of hamstring injury, and both are improved with eccentric training in non-injured populations. However, there is a lack of studies investigating the effect of eccentric training on strength and flexibility among previously injured athletes. This...
Article
Reduced flexibility has been documented in athletes with lower limb injury, however, stretching has limited evidence of effectiveness in preventing injury or reducing the risk of recurrence. In contrast, it has been proposed that eccentric training can improve strength and reduce the risk of injury, and facilitate increased muscle flexibility via s...

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