Sean Johnson-Bice

Sean Johnson-Bice
University of Manitoba | UMN · Department of Biological Sciences

Master of Science

About

11
Publications
3,130
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38
Citations
Introduction
I am a PhD candidate at the University of Manitoba. My research is focused on studying food web dynamics and relationships between Arctic foxes, red foxes, and their shared prey at the tundra-taiga interface along the western Hudson Bay coastline (near Churchill, MB). My research is part of the long-term Churchill Fox Project led by Jim Roth. I received my Master's degree from the Univ. of Minnesota, where my research was on the spatial dynamics and population ecology of beavers.
Education
September 2019 - August 2023
University of Manitoba
Field of study
  • Biological Sciences
August 2016 - August 2019
University of Minnesota Twin Cities
Field of study
  • Integrated Biosciences
August 2009 - May 2013
University of Wisconsin–Madison
Field of study
  • Conservation Biology

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Within the western Great Lakes (WGL) U.S. region (Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin), the ecological impacts that North American Beavers Castor canadensis (hereafter referred to as Beaver) have on cold‐water streams are generally considered to negatively affect salmonid populations where the two taxa interact. Beavers are common and widespread within...
Article
Full-text available
Over the past two decades, there have been numerous calls to make ecology a more predictive science through direct empirical assessments of ecological models and predictions. While the widespread use of model selection using information criteria has pushed ecology towards placing a higher emphasis on prediction, few attempts have been made to valid...
Article
Full-text available
Gray wolves are a premier example of how predators can transform ecosystems through trophic cascades. However , whether wolves change ecosystems as drastically as previously suggested has been increasingly questioned. We demonstrate how wolves alter wetland creation and recolonization by killing dispersing beavers. Beavers are ecosystem engineers t...
Article
Full-text available
Comprehensive knowledge of ambush behavior requires an understanding of where a predator expects prey to be, which is generally un-knowable because ambush predators often hunt mobile prey that exhibit complex, irregular, or inconspicuous movements. Wolves (Canis lupus) are primarily cursorial predators, but they use ambush strategies to hunt beaver...
Article
Full-text available
Like many ecological processes, natural disturbances exhibit scale-dependent dynamics that are largely a function of the magnitude, frequency and scale at which they are assessed. Ecosystem engineers create patch-scale disturbances that affect ecological processes, yet we know little about how these effects scale across space or vary through time....
Preprint
Full-text available
Top predators largely affect ecosystems through trophic interactions, but they also can have indirect effects by altering nutrient dynamics and acting as ecosystem engineers. Arctic foxes ( Vulpes lagopus ) are ecosystem engineers that concentrate nutrients around their dens, creating biogeochemical hotspots with lush vegetation on the nutrient-lim...
Article
Full-text available
Pekania pennanti (Fisher) is a generalist mesocarnivore that has been documented to prey on a diversity of mammals, but there have been no previous documented incidents of a Fisher hunting and killing a semi-aquatic mammal. Here, we report a first-hand observation and DNA evidence of a Fisher hunting and killing an Ondatra zibethicus (Muskrat) from...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Beavers are a major driver of ecological processes in the Greater Voyageurs Ecosystem (GVE), as their activities affect water storage, nutrient cycling, creation and succession of wetland habitats, and more. We have been studying the population dynamics, behavior, and physiology of beavers in the GVE since 2004. Additional work has also been done on beavers as ecological engineers, building on a wealth of previous research in the 1980s/1990s from other scientists.
Project
The Voyageurs Wolf Project is a University of Minnesota research project. The project's objective is to understand the predation behavior and reproductive ecology of wolves during the summer in the Greater Voyageurs Ecosystem, Minnesota.