Sean Thomas Giery

Sean Thomas Giery
Pennsylvania State University | Penn State · Department of Biology

PhD Applied Ecology

About

47
Publications
15,066
Reads
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694
Citations
Citations since 2016
28 Research Items
586 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
2016201720182019202020212022020406080100120
Additional affiliations
January 2017 - present
University of Connecticut
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
May 2013 - August 2015
North Carolina State University
Field of study
  • Applied Ecology
August 2009 - May 2013
September 2006 - January 2009

Publications

Publications (47)
Article
Full-text available
1. Cross-system resource flux is a fundamental component of ecological systems. Allochthonous material flows generate trophic linkages between adjacent food webs, thereby affecting community structure and stability in recipient systems. 2. We investigated cross-habitat trophic linkages between canopy and understorey food webs in a terrestrial, wood...
Article
Full-text available
In many models of sexual selection, conspicuous ornaments are preferred by mates because they indicate heritable signaler viability. To function as indicators, ornaments must exhibit a proportional relationship between expression and viability. In cases where the evolutionary interests of signaler and receiver diverge, selection favors exploitative...
Article
Full-text available
Natural selection plays an important role in the evolution of sexual communication systems. Here, we assess the effect of two well-known selection agents, transmission environment and predation, on interpopulation variation in sexual signals. Our model system is a series of 21 populations of Bahamian mosquitofish subjected to independent variation...
Article
Full-text available
Evolution is rapidly gaining attention as an important driver of ecological process. Yet, evolution via sexual selection has generally been omitted from this emerging synthesis. Our goal in this paper is to illustrate causative links by which sexually selected traits affect fundamental ecological interactions and processes. We summarize evidence, p...
Article
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Historically, many biologists assumed that evolution and ecology acted independently because evolution occurred over distances too great to influence most ecological patterns. Today, evidence indicates that evolution can operate over a range of spatial scales, including fine spatial scales. Thus, evolutionary divergence across space might frequentl...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanization is one of the most dramatic forms of environmental change with the potential to alter trophic relationships among organisms in cities. In this study, we combine gut-content and stable isotope analyses of brown anole diets with field sampling of arthropods to assess whether and how urbanization-induced variation of basal resources influ...
Article
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Assemblages of co‐occurring closely related species tend to vary in one or more niche dimensions, but niche partitioning also occurs at levels of biological organization above and below the species level. Niche space occupied by a community may involve variation among groups of species, such as guilds or ecomorphs, and among sexes or individuals wi...
Article
Full-text available
Managing wildlife populations in the face of global change requires regular data on the abundance and distribution of wild animals but acquiring these over appropriate spatial scales in a sustainable way has proven challenging. Here we present the data from Snapshot USA 2020, a second annual national mammal survey of the United States of America. T...
Article
In recent decades, anthropogenic and natural disturbances have increased in rate and intensity around the world, leaving few ecosystems unaffected. As a result of the interactions among these multiple disturbances, many biological communities now occur in a degraded state as collections of fragmented ecological pieces. Restoration strategies are tr...
Preprint
Full-text available
International expenditures for scientific research are important for small island developing nations, especially for those local communities that directly support research activities. We used the Abaco Islands, The Bahamas, as a case study to quantify the direct monetary inputs to a local economy via internationally-funded scientific research. We f...
Article
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The Metabolic Theory of Ecology explains ecological variation spanning taxonomic organization, space, and time based on universal physiological relationships. The theory depends on two core parameters: the normalization constant, a mass‐independent measure of metabolic rate expected to be invariant among similar species, and the scaling coefficient...
Article
Full-text available
With the accelerating pace of global change, it is imperative that we obtain rapid inventories of the status and distribution of wildlife for ecological inferences and conservation planning. To address this challenge, we launched the SNAPSHOT USA project, a collaborative survey of terrestrial wildlife populations using camera traps across the Unite...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how genetic variation is maintained in a metapopulation is a longstanding problem in evolutionary biology. Historical resurveys of polymorphisms have offered efficient insights about evolutionary mechanisms, but are often conducted on single, large populations, neglecting the more comprehensive view afforded by considering all populat...
Article
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Understanding whether organisms will be able to adapt to human-induced stressors currently endangering their existence is an urgent priority. Globally, multiple species moult from a dark summer to white winter coat to maintain camouflage against snowy landscapes. Decreasing snow cover duration owing to climate change is increasing mismatch in seaso...
Article
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Widespread human development has led to the proliferation of artificial light at night, an increasingly recognized but poorly understood component of anthropogenic global change. Animals specialized to diurnal activity are presented opportunities to use this night-light niche, but the ecological consequences are largely unknown. While published rec...
Article
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Character displacement may facilitate species coexistence through niche partitioning. However, the degree to which character displacement influences broader patterns of community assembly is unclear. Here, we capitalize on a natural experiment of community assembly on the oceanic island of Bermuda. Over the past century, three species of ecological...
Chapter
Full-text available
Here we analyze a large dataset of the diet of the brown anole (Anolis sagrei). We asked how the trophic niche varies among populations with the specific goal of testing a long-standing model of adaptive diversification – ecological release. Our results do not support the predicted inverse relationship between community richness and niche breadth....
Article
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Sphoeroides testudineus (Linnaeus, 1758), is a common, widely distributed fish in coastal ecosystems. To better understand the trophic niche of S. testudineus, we collected individuals from tidal creeks on Abaco Island, The Bahamas, and employed stomach content and stable isotope analysis. Examination of stomach contents showed that mollusks, such...
Article
Full-text available
Bermuda is an isolated, oceanic island with only one endemic terrestrial vertebrate, the Critically Endangered Bermuda skink (Plestiodon longirostris; Squamata, Scincidae). Major declines in P. longirostris populations have been caused primarily by habitat loss and mortality via invasive species (e.g., predation from birds and cats) and human waste...
Article
Introduced species can have diverse effects on recipient ecosystems. Here we share observations suggesting the formation of a reciprocally positive interaction, seed dispersal, between an introduced lizard and a native palm. We present evidence that the large arboreal lizard (Anolis equestris), native to The West Indies but well-established in sout...
Article
Full-text available
The isolated islands of Bermuda, located ca. 1,000 km east of North Carolina, USA in the Atlantic Ocean, have a rich history of non-native species introductions. Although Bermuda supports only one endemic lizard, the Bermuda Skink (Plestiodon [Eumeces] longirostris), four species of non-native anoles have been introduced and become established over...
Data
Male Bahamian mosquitofish (Gambusiaspp.) show marked interpopulation variation in dorsal fin coloration, as well as spotting on fins and flanks. Figure S2. Map of the upper Bahama Archipelago (inset) and its position in relation to the US and Greater Antilles. Figure S3. Differences in male coloration among Bahamian mosquitofish species. Figure S4...
Article
Full-text available
When confronted with similar environmental challenges, different organisms can exhibit dissimilar phenotypic responses. Therefore, understanding patterns of phenotypic divergence for closely related species requires considering distinct evolutionary histories. Here, we investigated how a common form of human-induced environmental alteration, habita...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Allochthonous material flows generate trophic linkages between adjacent food webs, thereby affecting community structure and stability in recipient systems. We investigated cross-habitat trophic linkages between canopy and understory food webs in a terrestrial, wooded, ecosystem in Miami Florida, USA. The focal communi...
Article
Full-text available
One consequence of human-driven habitat degradation in general, and habitat fragmentation in particular, is loss of biodiversity. An often-underappreciated aspect of habitat fragmentation relates to changes in the ecology of species that persist in altered habitats. In Bahamian wetlands, ecosystem fragmentation causes disruption of hydrological con...
Article
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The interactions between the evolutionary history of species and contemporary changes in their environment can result in both positive and negative outcomes for fitness and survival. Sharks are one the oldest groups of all extant vertebrates but, today, are among the most threatened globally, primarily because of destructive fishing practices. Hamm...
Article
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Stoichiometric mismatches between resources and consumers may drive a number of important ecological interactions, such as predation and herbivory. Such mismatches in nitrogen (N) or phosphorus (P) content between resources and consumers have furthered our understanding of consumer behavior and growth patterns in aquatic systems. However, stoichiom...
Article
Full-text available
Habitat fragmentation represents one of the most important threats to biodiversity. Fragmentation of aquatic ecosystems is pervasive, fundamentally altering aquatic community structure and ecosystem function on a worldwide scale. Because of the many ecological changes associated with hydrologic fragmentation of coastal wetlands, there may be cascad...
Article
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Red Cornsnakes (Pantherophis guttata) were first recorded in The Bahamas in the mid-1990s on Grand Bahama Island (Buckner and Franz 1987), with subsequent reports elsewhere on Grand Bahama (Little Bahama Bank) and New Providence (Great Bahama Bank) (Knapp et al. 2011, Buckner et al. 2012). Here, I report the first observations of Red Cornsnakes on...
Article
Full-text available
Anolis equestris is native to Cuba and has been introduced to Florida, USA (Kraus 2009. Alien Reptiles and Amphibians: A Scientific Compendium and Analysis. Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands. 563 pp.; Krysko et al. 2003. Florida Sci. 66:74–79). This species consumes a wide variety of animals and plants including vertebrates, invertebrates, and fruit...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Two prominent areas of food web research include the effect of species diversity on food web function, and allochthonous resource flux in spatially coupling food webs. Yet, few studies have examined how species diversity might affect food web coupling. For example, species-specific traits such as diet breadth and habit...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in vertebrate populations in tropical ecosystems are often understood to occur at large spatial and temporal scales. Understanding these dynamics and developing management responses when they are affected by hunting and land-use change require research and monitoring at large spatial scales. Data collection at such scales can be accomplishe...
Article
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Hunting remains an important subsistence activity for many indigenous peoples of the Neotropics. This paper describes indigenous hunting patterns using a mixed-methods approach in southern Guyana from a space and place perspective that takes into account both biophysical and cultural/spiritual factors. Findings confirm those of others, that distanc...
Conference Paper
Background/Question/Methods Conservation efforts inclusive of local communities have been widely implemented however, the effectiveness of this paradigm remains contentious. We investigate whether an Integrated Conservation and Development Project (ICDP), located in Guyana, has effectively translated into successful conservation at the village leve...
Article
Full-text available
We examined the role of lizards in the ecology of Lyme disease in New York and Maryland. We collected data on vector tick infestations, measured lizard "realized" reservoir competence for the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, and estimated lizard population density. These data were incorporated into a model that predicts a host's abilit...

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