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Scott Wooldridge

Scott Wooldridge
Catchment to Reef Management Solutions, Newcastle Australia · Research and Consulting

PhD

About

81
Publications
37,233
Reads
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2,777
Citations
Citations since 2016
32 Research Items
1395 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250
Additional affiliations
January 2016 - March 2016
Catchment to Reef Management Solutions, Port Macquarie, Australia
Position
  • Principal Investigator
January 2016 - April 2016
Catchment to Reef Management Solutions, Newcastle Australia
Position
  • Principal Investigator
January 2016 - April 2016
Catchment to Reef Management Solutions, Newcastle Australia
Position
  • Principal Investigator

Publications

Publications (81)
Article
Full-text available
Changes in the atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) leads to predictable impacts on the surface ocean carbonate system. Here, the importance of atmospheric pCO2 <260 ppmv is established for the optimum performance (and stability) of the algal endosymbiosis employed by a key suite of tropical reef-building coral species. Violation of this symb...
Article
Full-text available
Here, I contribute new insight into why excess seawater nutrients are an increasingly identified feature at reef locations that have low resistance to thermal stress. Specifically, I link this unfavourable synergism to the development of enlarged (suboptimal) zooxanthellae densities that paradoxically limit the capacity of the host coral to build t...
Article
Full-text available
The threats of wide-scale coral bleaching and reef demise associated with anthropogenic climate change are widely known. Here, the additional role of poor water quality in lowering the thermal tolerance (i.e. bleaching ‘resistance’) of symbiotic reef corals is considered. In particular, a quantitative linkage is established between terrestrially-so...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper I challenge the notion that a healthy and resilient coral is (in all cases) a fast-growing coral, and by inference, that a reef characterised by a fast trajectory toward high coral cover is necessarily a healthy and resilient reef. Instead, I explain how emerging evidence links fast skeletal extension rates with elevated coral-algae (...
Data
Comparison of heat stress on the northern Great Barrier Reef for the austral summers 2015/16 and 2008/09
Data
Variation in monthly SOI highlighting that the summer of 2008/09 was associated with a strong La Nina (no upwelling) whilst the summer of 2015/06 was associated with an extremely strong El Nino (nutrient rich upwelling).
Data
Published manuscript. Yuen et al. (2009) Effects of live rock on the reef-building coral Acropora digitifera cultured with high levels of nitrogenous compounds. Aquacultural Engineering 41:35-43. Good evidence for the role of algae to draw down DIN, and thereby increase Fv/Fm, ETR and reduced bleaching and mortality under thermal stress.
Data
The beneficial role of seaweeds in reducing coral bleaching on the inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef (1998). cf. Jompa and McCook (1998) Seaweeds safe the reef (unpulished project data). See: http://www.aims.gov.au/docs/projectnet/seaweeds.html
Data
Reef corals calcify and photosthesize faster in the presence of non-calcareous algae. cf. McConnhaughey (2000) Community and environmental influences on reef coral calcification. Limnology and Oceanogr 45:1667-1671.
Data
Bleaching sensitivity versus flow cf. McClanahan TR, Maina J, Moothien-Pillay R, Baker AC (2005) Effects of geography, taxa, water flow, and temperature variation on coral bleaching intensity in Mauritius. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 298:131-142
Data
Bleaching sensitivity versus pCO2 cf. Anthony et al. (2008) Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in reef builders. PNAS105:17442-17446.
Data
Figure from Yentsch et al. (2002) Sunlight and water transparency: cornerstones in coral research. Journal of Experimental Biology and Ecology 268:171-183.
Data
NPc and NPo versus pCO2 cf. Langdon C, Atkinson MJ (2005) Effect of elevated pCO2 on photosynthesis and calcification of corals and interactions with seasonal change in temperature/irradiance and nutrient enrichment. JGR DOI: 10.1029/2004JC002576
Data
Description of water quality and heat stress indices developed for GBR bleaching model
Article
Full-text available
The coastal seagrass meadows in the Townsville region of the Great Barrier Reef are crucial seagrass foraging habitat for endangered dugong populations. Deteriorating coastal water quality and in situ light levels reduce the extent of these meadows, particularly in years with significant terrestrial runoff from the nearby Burdekin River catchment....
Article
Loads of suspended sediment, nutrients and pesticides discharged to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) have increased greatly due to agricultural and urban development of the GBR catchment. As a result, in association with climate change impacts, the ecosystems of the GBR have degraded greatly in recent decades, and the decline in ecosystem health contin...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Article
Full-text available
A spatial risk assessment model is developed for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR, Australia) that helps identify reef locations at higher or lower risk of coral bleaching in summer heat-wave conditions. The model confirms the considerable benefit of discriminating nutrient-enriched areas that contain corals with enlarged (suboptimal) symbiont densities...
Article
Full-text available
Here, I contribute new insight into why excess seawater nutrients are an increasingly identified feature at reef locations that have low resistance to thermal stress. Specifically, I link this unfavourable synergism to the development of enlarged (suboptimal) zooxanthellae densities that paradoxically limit the capacity of the host coral to build t...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Technical Report
Full-text available
• The threat posed to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) from a continual warming of background (ambient) summer ocean temperatures (e.g. due to global climate change) is extreme. • The continuous background warming has served to make previously acceptable seawater nutrient levels (chlorophyll-a > 0.45 µg.L-1) damaging to the health and bleaching sensiti...
Article
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, we postulate a unique environmental triggering sequence for primary outbreaks of crown-of-thorns starfish (COTS, Acanthaster planci) on the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR, Australia). Notably, we extend the previous terrestrial runoff hypothesis, viz. nutrient-enriched terrestrial runoff→elevated phytoplankton 'bloom' concentrations...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, I utilise the CO2 (sink) limitation model of coral bleaching to propose a new biochemical framework that explains how certain (well-adapted) coral species can utilise heterotrophic carbon acquisition to combat the damaging algal photoinhibition response sequence that underpins thermal bleaching, thereby increasing thermal bleaching r...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that different coral species have different susceptibilities to thermal stress, yet it is less clear which biological or physical mechanisms allow some corals to resist thermal stress, whereas other corals bleach and die. Although the type of symbiont is clearly of fundamental importance, many aspects of coral bleaching canno...
Article
Full-text available
That corals skeletons are built of aragonite crystals with taxonomy-linked ultrastructure has been well understood since the 19th century. Yet, the way by which corals control this crystallization process remains an unsolved question. Here, I outline a new conceptual model of coral biomineralisation that endeavours to relate known skeletal features...
Article
Full-text available
Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis...
Article
Full-text available
That corals skeletons are built of aragonite crystals with taxonomy-linked ultrastructure has been well understood since the 19th century. Yet, the way by which corals control this crystallization process remains an unsolved question. Here, I outline a new conceptual model of coral biominerationsation that endeavours to relate known skeletal featur...
Article
Full-text available
Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disrupt...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs are threatened globally by the climatic consequences of rising atmospheric CO2 levels; in many regions they are also threatened locally, for example, by reductions in the water quality of runoff from adjacent catchments. Interaction between global and local pressures makes it possible to use local actions to mitigate the impacts of clim...
Article
Full-text available
Most scleractinian corals and many other cnidarians host intracellular photosynthetic dinoflagellate symbionts ("zooxanthellae"). The zooxanthellae contribute to host metabolism and skeletogenesis to such an extent that this symbiosis is well recognised for its contribution in creating the coral reef ecosystem. The stable functioning of cnidarian s...
Article
Full-text available
The threats of wide-scale coral bleaching and reef demise associated with anthropogenic (global) climate change are widely known. Less well considered is the contributing role of conditions local to the reef, in particular reef water quality, in co-determining the physiological tolerance of corals to increasing sea temperatures and declining pH. He...
Article
Full-text available
The consideration of 'mutual benefits' and partner cooperation have long been the accepted standpoint from which to draw inference about the onset, maintenance and breakdown of the coral-algae endosymbiosis. In this paper, I review recent research into the climate-induced breakdown of this important symbiosis (namely 'coral bleaching') that challen...
Article
Full-text available
Symbiotic reef corals exude large volumes of mucus when exposed to environmental conditions that challenge the integrity of the coral-algae endosymbiosis. Here, the physiological consequences of CO2-limitation within the 'dark' photosynthetic reactions of the algal endosymbionts ('zooxanthellae') are investigated as the possible cause of the releas...
Article
Full-text available
The threats of wide-scale coral bleaching and reef demise associated with anthropogenic climate change are widely known. Moreover, rates of genetic adaptation and/or changes in the coral-zooxanthella partnerships are considered unlikely to be sufficiently fast for corals to acquire increased physiological resistance to increasing sea temperatures a...
Article
Full-text available
A prototype Bayesian belief network (BBN) is described that provides catchment-to-reef integration of previously unlinked components of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) social-ecological system. The BBN is developed to help decision-makers understand the socio-economic trade-offs associated with managing for resilient reef communities given the threat...
Article
Full-text available
The symbiosis between reef-building corals and their algae endosymbionts is sensitive to temperature stress, which makes coral reefs vulnerable to climate change. However, a precise understanding of the capacity for the symbiosis to adapt to climate change is currently restricted by the lack of coherent explanation for the set of cellular events le...
Article
Full-text available
Enzymes are often referred to as the "agents of life" – a very apt term, since essentially all life processes are controlled by them. Typically, these enzymes only function across a narrow band of environmental conditions, particularly temperature and pH. Ambient conditions that challenge these operating conspecifics trigger enzyme dysfunction. Her...
Article
Large-scale catastrophic events, although rare, lie generally beyond the control of local management and can prevent marine reserves from achieving biodiversity outcomes. We formulate a new conservation planning problem that aims to minimize the probability of missing conservation targets as a result of catastrophic events. To illustrate this appro...
Article
Full-text available
We used historical flood plume extent data (modelled) to quantify the typical spatial extent of the summer runoff-seawater mixing zone of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon. Spatially explicit analysis of the variability of in situ chlorophyll a concentrations (observed) across the runoff-seawater mixing zone, then allowed us to explore regional d...
Article
Full-text available
This paper explores how successful management interventions might benefit coral reefs during the period of climate warming that is expected in coming decades. To aid this task we have developed a prototype decision-support tool, called 'ReefState', which integrates the outcomes of management interventions within a 'belief network' of connected vari...
Article
Full-text available
Ocean warming and coral bleaching are patchy phenomena over a wide range of scales. This paper is part of a larger study that aims to understand the relationship between heat stress and ecological impact caused by the 2002-bleaching event in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). We used a Bayesian belief network (BBN) as a framework to refine our prior bel...
Article
This paper reports on a new soil moisture disaggregation scheme based on topography and soil depth information. It is designed for low resolution remote sensing data assimilation into hydrological modelling. The scheme makes use of a simple Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer model coupled to the TOPMODEL formalism. Water and energy balance are com...
Article
Low-yielding catchments with ephemeral streams provide a stern test of the capability of conceptual catchment models for predicting the hydrologic response of the natural landscape. Sustained periods of little or no flow mean that the information content of the streamflow time-series for parameter estimation is limited. During periods with no strea...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we utilise a collection of modelling tools based on the Bayesian paradigm, to develop a framework that is capable of delivering the continuum of "value added" science; the progression from the acquisition of field-based and remotely-sensed evidence, through to the development of decision support structures that have the potential to a...
Article
In this paper, a disaggregation approach is suggested for the task of modelling hydrological responses within a spatially and temporally variable environment. With such an approach, large-scale environmental characteristics are tested for their ability to provide insight into the dominant physical mechanisms responsible for observed catchment respo...
Article
In this study, a simple semi-distributed model is combined with a landscape/climate regionalisation strategy with the aim of developing a predictive capacity regarding the range of effects caused by varying types and intensities of land-use at the regional-catchment scale. Using a case-study application within a 1260km2 catchment in eastern Austral...
Article
Full-text available
Regional-scale catchments are characterised typically by natural variability in climatic and land-surface features. This paper addresses the important question regarding the appropriate level of spatial disaggregation necessary to guarantee a hydrologically sound consideration of this variability. Using a simple hydrologic model along with physical...
Article
Full-text available
A connection between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and weather phenomena in eastern Australia has been recognized for several decades. However, little work has been devoted to addressing how this correlation affects hydrological system behaviour within regional-scale catchments. In this study, spatially distributed ENSO effects are evaluated...
Article
Full-text available
Regional-scale catchments are characterised typically by natural variability in climatic and land-surface features. This paper addresses the important question regarding the appropriate level of spatial disaggregation necessary to guarantee a hydrologically sound consideration of this variability. Using a simple hydrologic model along with physical...
Article
Full-text available
High linear correlation between concurrent measurements of net all-wave radiation Q(*), and global incoming short-wave radiation E(g)↓ was found for hourly, daytime and 24-h totals measured over a grassland catchment in the subhumid climate region of southeastern Australia. Five years of daily measurements were used to study the temporal variabilit...
Conference Paper
hin plate smoothing splines are used to merge daily raingauge and radar rainfall data. The procedure involves using the uncertain, but spatially continuous, radar estimates as an independent variable in a spline function fitted to the raingauge measurements. The procedure is tested for a rainfall period in the Lower Hunter Region of New South Wales...
Article
Full-text available
Selection of areas for protection within coral reef MPAs could benefit from a better understanding of factors that confer resistance to coral bleaching and mortality. Suggested factors include regional oceanographic settings and local topography that promote local cooling of the water, and the species and genotypic composition of the local coral/zo...
Article
Full-text available
56 Low-yielding catchments with ephemeral streams provide a stern test of the capability of conceptual catchment models for 57 predicting the hydrologic response of the natural landscape. Sustained periods of little or no flow mean that the information content 58 of the streamflow time-series for parameter estimation is limited. During periods with...

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Projects (6)
Project
*******ATTENTION CoralList Readers******* see Project Log for x3 figures cf T.itlyanov et al. (1996)